Interventions in Committee
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
Kimberly Elmslie
View Kimberly Elmslie Profile
Kimberly Elmslie
2014-11-20 9:27
Yes, absolutely. The Canadian Best Practices Portal is a mechanism we use at the Public Health Agency of Canada to fulfill our mandate in sharing what we know about the evidence on best practices. We receive submissions from organizations both nationally and internationally to have their programs reviewed as a best practice. They're put through a rigorous methodology, and at the end of that process we determine whether or not they can be designated as a best practice.
One of the key criteria is that a fulsome evaluation be done of the intervention, because as you will well know, oftentimes organizations are finding it difficult to determine which programs are most likely to be effective. Once they start to implement programs, even if they're not effective, it's sometimes hard for them to stop.
What we're trying to do is, up front, give organizations evidence-based practices that they can look at, adapt, and go to the research community to talk about further as to how they apply in their context. Through that process, we have programs that cover a wide range of violence prevention practices that have been determined through a rigorous process to be effective.
View Susan Truppe Profile
CPC (ON)
How does one know about this portal in order to give you the information to evaluate and make it number 81 on there?
Kimberly Elmslie
View Kimberly Elmslie Profile
Kimberly Elmslie
2014-11-20 9:29
Through the public health community, we make the portal well known through that network. We rely on our public health colleagues to spread the word beyond to others. We also interact with academic institutions. They're almost always involved in some way in the evaluation of these programs. They also are aware of the Canadian Best Practices Portal.
We're always looking for new ways to bring greater visibility to this work. We are right now in the process of evaluating the portal and we will, through that process, find better and more effective ways, hopefully using social media, to reach out further and ensure that those who need to know about these interventions know.
View Susan Truppe Profile
CPC (ON)
That's a great idea. Thank you.
You probably don't remember everything that's on there, but is there anything that stands out as a best practice, something that you think was just a great idea?
Kimberly Elmslie
View Kimberly Elmslie Profile
Kimberly Elmslie
2014-11-20 9:30
Let me tell you about one of our children's programs that is offered in Toronto. It is called Connections. The program in Toronto that runs this is called Breaking the Cycle. Under that program they have put in place opportunity for women experiencing violence to receive services and counselling and to come to a safe place to discuss their issues and get the support they need, and also to get the referrals in the community to sustain support that will help them break the cycle of violence and hopefully not be re-victimized.
That's one example. There are many. I know that as you do the study you're going to be very impressed as you look across the country by the number of dedicated community organizations that are leveraging funding and expertise to make a difference in violence against women and children.
Gregory Taylor
View Gregory Taylor Profile
Gregory Taylor
2014-11-19 16:51
Mr. Chair and members of the committee, thank you for giving me an opportunity to discuss with you the amendment to the Public Health Agency of Canada Act—which is presented in Bill C-43—and my role as Chief Public Health Officer of the Public Health Agency of Canada.
As you know, that amendment aims to redefine the role of the chief public health officer so that it would focus exclusively on the public health needs of Canadians. This amendment also aims to create a position of president of the Public Health Agency of Canada, who would be in charge of managing the agency.
I strongly support this amendment. My unique journey has allowed me to gain a lot of experience and come to this conclusion.
I started my medical career as an M.D. in a private small city practice. As a family physician I experienced the challenges of holding two jobs much like the position of chief public health officer. On one hand I was helping patients improve their health and essentially managing a business on the other, often causing tension between the two.
In the 20 years since, I've held progressive leadership positions in the federal government, specializing in public health, and I've watched the agency grow from a branch of Health Canada to a global leader in public health. Today with an ebola epidemic in the public spotlight, we're reminded why the country needs its leading public health professional to focus exclusively on one major task: public health.
Since the agency's inception, the competencies and experiences to lead national public health issues have grown, as have the skills needed to manage a growing public sector organization. The Public Health Agency of Canada now has over 2,000 employees across the country. It's annual operating budget is over $600 million.
For years now it's been clear to me and my colleagues that the CPHO role must evolve and complement that growth in a way that makes sense. Division 20 of this bill will allow my position to focus on moving Canada forward in public health issues, providing advice directly to the Minister of Health and to Canadians, collaborating with all partners and interacting with multiple key players including the Canadian public. At the same time, a dedicated agency president will provide focused strategic management and corporate leadership for a world-leading, vibrant and strong organization.
The president, as deputy head of the agency, will assume some of the management responsibilities currently assigned to the CPHO including accountabilities for finance, audit, evaluation, staffing, official languages, and access to information and privacy. These are all important functions requiring the attention of a senior leader.
The changes proposed do not diminish the role of the chief public health officer, they enhance it. In essence, they associate internal management and capacity issues with a dedicated agency head and direction on public health issues with the CPHO. It makes good management sense and good public health sense to make these changes.
It's a structure that works well for many provinces and territories, and for countries, including the United Kingdom and Australia. In fact, we've been moving this way as an agency for some time now and have, in fact, adopted this type of management structure since 2012. At that time we began to separate out the roles and responsibilities of the CPHO on an interim basis. My appointment as CPHO on September 24th of this year—the date of the agency's 10th anniversary—reflected the first step needed to move public health forward in Canada.
The next step will ensure we have the right people in the right positions focused on the right tasks for Canadians. I'm very proud of the agency's maturation. The agency has become a world leader in public health, and just as its profile of importance has grown, so have public expectations of our work. We need to enhance our public health connections globally.
After 10 years and many high-profile public health success stories, the agency and the position of chief public health officer are no longer young. We now need to adapt and advance in a way that makes good management and public health sense.
Mr. Chair, committee members, for these reasons I strongly support division 20 of Bill C-43 before you today that will amend the Public Health Agency of Canada Act.
The associate deputy minister and I believe these changes are the right thing to do for the health of Canadians. I thank you for inviting me today.
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2014-11-19 17:30
Thank you to the witnesses for coming.
I'd like to ask Dr. Taylor a question. When you confront a public health issue like ebola, are you free to speak out publicly if, as, and when you wish?
Gregory Taylor
View Gregory Taylor Profile
Gregory Taylor
2014-11-19 17:30
I speak very often to the public. I speak to the media. I speak to parliamentarians on a regular basis. I speak very frequently.
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2014-11-19 17:31
The reason I ask is that with this new arrangement, with the president and yourself, clause 256 only talks about you providing advice to the minister and the president on public health matters.
Do you consult with the ministry first before you provide advice? Are you free to go out on your own if you wish?
Gregory Taylor
View Gregory Taylor Profile
Gregory Taylor
2014-11-19 17:31
When I'm speaking to Canadians, I'm speaking on behalf of the Public Health Agency. Part of the role of the CPHO has always been speaking to Canadians and that will continue. There's also an annual report, the CPHO report, that goes directly to parliamentarians.
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2014-11-19 17:31
I'm familiar with the annual report but this section changes now, and only contemplates speaking and giving advice to the minister. I wasn't sure, do you have a communications protocol or something to confirm your ability to speak independently to the media?
Gregory Taylor
View Gregory Taylor Profile
Gregory Taylor
2014-11-19 17:31
It's advice I give to the minister that goes to the president, the cabinet, and the Prime Minister. Speaking to Canadians is continually a clear role that happens, and as I say, I'm speaking on behalf of the entire agency and oftentimes on behalf of the entire government.
When I'm speaking on behalf of the government, I confer within the agency and confer that we're having the right message consistent with other departments, for example.
Gregory Taylor
View Gregory Taylor Profile
Gregory Taylor
2014-11-19 17:32
No, nothing changes that. I will still be the spokesperson for public health for the federal government.
View James Rajotte Profile
CPC (AB)
Merci, monsieur Caron.
I'll take the start of the next round, and if I have time, I think I'll share with Mr. Allen.
Dr. Taylor, I appreciate your being here, and I appreciate your clarifying it, because I think there were some issues raised about some of the changes. I think there was a lack of clarity with respect to the changes that were here, whether you supported them or not. Some of the commentary seemed to indicate that it would diminish your role, that it would diminish the influence you would have, that it would diminish the advice. I'm glad Mr. Rankin clarified the issue with respect to the fact that you still will be able to speak directly to Canadians. I appreciate that very much.
I just want to ask if you can state clearly again that these changes will not in any way diminish your role as chief public health officer.
Results: 106 - 120 of 143 | Page: 8 of 10

|<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|