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Results: 1 - 15 of 32
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-05-25 19:10 [p.14099]
Mr. Speaker, our government's support for public infrastructure in this country has never been stronger. Since 2006, our government has dramatically increased the average annual federal funding for thousands of provincial, territorial and municipal infrastructure projects across the country. We are building on Canada's historic investments with $80 billion for public infrastructure over the next 10 years, including the $53-billion new building Canada plan for provincial, territorial and municipal infrastructure. As Canada's largest and longest federal infrastructure plan, the new building Canada plan provides predictable and flexible funding so that municipalities from coast to coast to coast can address their most pressing infrastructure priorities and plan for the long term.
Our new building Canada plan ensures support through a number of different funds. The federal gas tax fund supplies almost $2 billion in federal funding per year. Since 2006, our Conservative government has extended, doubled, indexed and made the gas tax fund permanent through legislation. We have also expanded its eligible categories so that it covers a wider range of types of projects. Further, municipalities can pool, bank and borrow against this gas tax funding.
Another major component of the plan is the new building Canada fund, made up of the national infrastructure component for projects of national significance. The provincial-territorial infrastructure component has dedicated funding for provinces and territories. Under the provincial-territorial infrastructure component, each Canadian province and territory receives a base amount, plus a per capita allocation over the 10 years of the program.
Not only are the new building Canada plan programs well under way, over $6 billion in public infrastructure funding continues to flow from the original plan and other federal programs to support infrastructure projects across the country.
Canadian municipalities, including those in Manitoba, have unprecedented ways in which they can put the federal funding to work in their communities. Through the plan, Manitoba will benefit from almost $1.2 billion in dedicated federal funding, including almost $476 million under the new building Canada fund, and an estimated $713 million under the federal gas tax fund.
The new building Canada plan has been open for business since March 2014, and programs are well under way. We are working with the provinces and the territories to identify projects, and we are processing proposals as quickly as they come in. In fact, more than $6 billion in total project costs have already been announced under the new program, and we look forward to announcing many more projects in 2015.
Late last year, our Prime Minister announced another $5.8 billion to address national infrastructure priorities that will have long-lasting, local benefits, including, of course, job creation. There is also significant funding from existing federal infrastructure programs, which continue to support public infrastructure in municipalities across Canada.
In closing, our government is committed to creating jobs, promoting growth and building strong, prosperous communities across this great country.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-05-25 19:14 [p.14099]
Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned earlier, our government's support for public infrastructure has never been stronger. Since 2006, our government has dramatically increased the average annual federal funding for thousands of provincial, territorial and municipal infrastructure projects across the country. We are building on these historic investments with $80 billion for public infrastructure over 10 years, including, of course, the $53-billion new building Canada plan.
Canadian municipalities have unprecedented ways in which they can put this federal funding to work in their communities. People in St-Pierre-Jolys, Manitoba, can count on their federal allocation through the gas tax fund as a minimum. We look forward to considering investing in projects that this city deems to be important, just as we do for all Canadian municipalities through the new building Canada fund.
Our government is committed to creating jobs, promoting growth and building strong, prosperous communities across this country.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-05-25 19:20 [p.14100]
Mr. Speaker, in fact, since this Conservative government was elected in 2006, Canada has led all G7 countries with respect to investments and infrastructure as a percentage of GDP. What have been the results of those investments? The average age of public infrastructure is now at its lowest point since the early 1980s.
Our government recognizes that public infrastructure is the backbone of our communities and that investing in infrastructure is vital to ensuring strong, sustainable, and healthy communities with thriving economies. That is why this government is providing an unprecedented $80 billion for public infrastructure over the next 10 years. This includes the $53 billion new Building Canada plan, the largest and longest federal infrastructure plan in our country's history. The plan was designed following extensive consultation with our partners. It provides flexible and predictable federal funding in support of infrastructure projects of national, regional, and local significance, and it is made up of a number of different funds.
The new Building Canada plan has been open for business since March of 2014. Moreover, over $6 billion in public infrastructure funding continues to support infrastructure projects across the country from our original Building Canada plan, which started in 2007.
Providing almost $2 billion of predictable funding per year directly to municipalities, the federal gas tax fund has been significantly improved since 2006. Not only have we expanded its eligible categories to support a greater variety of projects, but our government has also extended it, doubled it, indexed it, and legislated it as a permanent source of federal infrastructure funding.
Moreover, municipalities can pool, bank, and borrow against this funding, allowing them more flexibility in addressing their local needs. Municipalities, including Thunder Bay, can count on the federal gas tax fund. In fact, last year Thunder Bay used contributions from the federal gas tax fund to help revitalize local roads and bridges. Thunder Bay received more than $6.2 million in 2014 alone through the federal gas tax fund.
The plan also contains the $14 billion new Building Canada fund, which is geared toward funding projects of importance to provinces, territories, and municipalities. Under the provincial-territorial infrastructure component, each Canadian province and territory will receive a base amount, plus a per capita allocation over the life of the program. Our government is working with provinces and territories to identify projects, and we are processing proposals as quickly as they come in. We look forward to considering investing in further projects that Thunder Bay deems critical, just as we will for all municipalities across Canada.
Our government is focused on creating the right conditions for economic growth and prosperity.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-05-25 19:24 [p.14101]
Mr. Speaker, our government recognizes that investing in public infrastructure is vital to ensuring strong, sustainable, and healthy communities with thriving economies. That is why this government is providing an unprecedented $80 billion for public infrastructure over 10 years, which includes our new Building Canada plan.
This plan has been open for business since March of 2014, and over $6 billion in funding continues to flow from our existing infrastructure programs. Last year, the City of Thunder Bay used contributions used contributions from the federal gas tax fund to help rehabilitate its local roads and bridges. Our government is working with provinces and territories to identify their top infrastructure priorities, and we are processing proposals as quickly as they come in.
We look forward to considering investing in projects that Thunder Bay deems critical, just as we will for all Canadian municipalities, to ensure the long-term prosperity of this country.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-02-16 14:21 [p.11215]
Mr. Speaker, of course, we know that statement is incorrect. Our Conservative government has introduced the largest and the longest infrastructure investments in Canadian history: $75 billion over the next decade. This includes $53 billion for municipalities, provinces, and territories.
Our new building Canada plan has been open for business since last March. In less than a year, numerous projects have already been approved, representing an estimated $5 billion in infrastructure for our country.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-02-16 14:22 [p.11215]
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate that the Liberals have a hard time understanding the bottom line. Let me make clear what the bottom line is in terms of infrastructure investments in our country.
If they read just a bit lower on that page, they will clearly see that our government will be investing between $5 billion and $6 billion in infrastructure investment every year. These investments will enhance our economy. They will create jobs and improve the quality of life for all Canadians.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-02-16 14:24 [p.11215]
Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government will take no lessons from the Liberals on infrastructure investments in the country. Our investments are three times greater for infrastructure than the previous Liberal government's.
Let me very clearly lay out the steps in this process, and I will speak slowly for my Liberal colleagues. Applications to the plan are submitted. When projects are approved, federal funds are earmarked. Then construction begins. Then the municipality submits its bill to the federal government. We reimburse the municipality as costs are incurred. Money flows over the course of the construction project.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-02-05 14:26 [p.11113]
Mr. Speaker, it is intriguing that the Liberals have this sudden conversion to the importance of infrastructure, given that they did so little on this file when they were government.
As the Conservative government, we have invested three times the amount in infrastructure than the Liberals did when they were government. These investments are creating jobs and prosperity. They are enhancing our country's growth and productivity.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-02-05 14:27 [p.11113]
Mr. Speaker, that member is once again misleading the House.
The new Building Canada plan has been open for business since March. In less than a year, projects representing an estimated $5 billion have already been approved for funding.
When we first announced the new Building Canada plan in budget 2013, here is what that stalwart of the Conservative Party, Ottawa mayor Jim Watson, had to say:
This is good news for the city of Ottawa and indeed good news for all cities across Canada.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-02-05 14:28 [p.11114]
Mr. Speaker, one of the key pillars of the new Building Canada plan is the gas tax fund. Here is what our Conservative government has done with respect to the gas tax fund: we have doubled it. We made it permanent. We are indexing it moving forward.
Municipalities know, to the penny, exactly how much money they are receiving. That money is flowing today, and municipalities are using it for their infrastructure needs.
We are getting the job done.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-01-30 11:39 [p.10856]
Mr. Speaker, that is another myth the Liberals continue to perpetuate. This is absolutely incorrect.
This is a Conservative government that is making record investments in infrastructure. The new Building Canada plan is the longest and largest infrastructure investment in Canadian history, $53 billion over the next decade. It is a long-term, stable, predictable commitment.
Already the new Building Canada plan, open for business less than a year, has already approved projects representing $5 billion.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2015-01-29 12:15 [p.10787]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased today to rise to speak about the very great partnerships that our federal government has developed and how they have contributed, and continue to contribute, to making our country, Canada, one of the best countries in which to live.
Infrastructure is the backbone of our communities. It supports economic growth and a better quality of life because it provides Canadians with the essentials they need, transportation, clean water, recreation and cultural facilities, to carry out a safe, healthy and productive life. Public infrastructure has always been, and will continue to be, a key driver of Canada's success as a nation. Whether it is investments in highways, water treatment technology or airports, these investments help our industries reach global markets, protect our environment and support our cities and our communities. Investment in quality public infrastructure builds strong communities, but it cannot be done by one single order of government.
I remind members of Helen Keller's words of wisdom. She said, “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” This, I believe, is how progress is achieved, meeting challenges through co-operation across all levels of government.
As the Parliamentary Secretary for Infrastructure and Communities, I am very proud of the achievements that have been made possible through the steady collaboration with our provincial, territorial and municipal partners. In Canada, the vast majority of core public infrastructure is in fact owned by municipalities, provinces and territories, with the balance, less than one-tenth, owned by the federal government. This means that provinces, territories and municipalities are ultimately responsible for building, expanding, maintaining, rehabilitating and operating almost all of Canada's public infrastructure. As a result, provinces, territories and municipalities are also best positioned to identify local and regional needs and priorities.
In order to provide a better quality of life for Canadians, to maintain a competitive edge over other G7 countries and to keep our economy on track, we are making record investments in public infrastructure. We are doing so through the $53 billion new Building Canada plan, which provides the necessary funding to other levels of government for their critical projects and initiatives. While these funds are used to fund priorities identified by provinces, territories and municipalities, these projects could not proceed without federal collaboration and contributions.
In recent years, Canadians have seen the benefits of partnership and the historic infrastructure investments that the federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments have been making under the leadership of our great Prime Minister.
When the original Building Canada plan was launched in 2007, it marked a new era for infrastructure partnership funding, and a new relationship among all orders of government. The plan was the result of engagement and discussions with provinces and territories, as well as the municipal sector. The intent was to identify an approach to provide federal funding for provincial, territorial and municipal public infrastructure in a way that was more predictable and long term in nature. In fact, the development of the plan itself, in 2006, clearly set the tone for a new approach to public infrastructure, a much better approach.
Our Conservative government consulted with all provinces and territories and a number of municipal associations with the purpose of putting federal funding on a predictable long-term track. This series of meetings at all levels resulted in a coordinated suite of infrastructure programs that recognize provincial-territorial jurisdiction for municipalities, as well as the diverse needs and opportunities across Canada. This collaborative approach laid the groundwork for a fast and efficient response to the global economic slowdown in 2009.
Budget 2009 announced the acceleration of existing infrastructure funding under the Building Canada plan, as well as new infrastructure funding over two years, in order to stimulate economic growth and employment, while also supporting Canada's long-term productivity.
Strong and effective partnerships with provincial, territorial and municipal governments were essential to the success of the economic action plan's infrastructure elements. A concerted national effort was made to overcome the challenges of developing and rolling out this funding in a very short period of time.
There have been literally thousands of projects funded across the country. Regardless of their size or scope, they all improved the quality of life in the communities in which they were built. At the end of the day, this is what Canadians care about most, and this is something of which we can all be very proud.
The results of the economic action plan are a testament to the high degree of co-operation that was shown by all levels of government across Canada under the leadership of our Prime Minister. It is based on this level of co-operation and success that our government forged ahead with the new Building Canada plan, which is currently under way.
In budget 2011, our government committed to developing a long-term plan for public infrastructure that would extend beyond the expiry of the Building Canada plan in 2014. To meet this commitment, we engaged provinces, territories, municipalities and other infrastructure stakeholders to shape a new plan. This involved taking stock of our achievements and lessons learned, identifying priorities for the future, and building the knowledge required to address Canada's future infrastructure needs.
As part of this engagement, in the summer of 2012, the then-minister of state, the member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, and the minister of infrastructure both chaired regional round tables with our provincial and territorial counterparts, where they met with close to 150 provincial, territorial, regional, municipal and private sector stakeholders from across the country to discuss the development of our new plan.
Over the course of 2012 and 2013, Infrastructure Canada officials also met with provinces, territories, municipalities and other stakeholder groups to discuss the development of the new plan. During this process, we took note of a great variety of ideas and opinions. However, a few key themes emerged, namely: the need to build on the success of past programs; the need for long-term, stable and flexible funding; the need for infrastructure programs that support economic growth; and the need to identify a role for the private sector.
These consultations had a real impact on the development of the new plan, and we could not have done it without the feedback from our partners.
Let me explain the results of this collaborative work.
Our partners indicated that infrastructure funding programs needed improvements, so we improved them. In order to provide the flexibility that the provinces, territories and municipalities asked for, categories under the new plan were realigned to give our partners the freedom to decide where they needed their funding to go. Predictability was a major request. The new Building Canada plan is a 10-year plan. Our partners requested that processes be more efficient. We reorganized our processes to streamline both funding applications and expense claims.
Not only have we heard our partners, but we acted upon what we heard, and the new plan speaks for itself. The overall federal investment in infrastructure will be more than $75 billion in the next 10 years. At the heart of these investments is, of course, the new Building Canada plan.
The new Building Canada plan provides $53 billion for provincial, territorial and municipal infrastructure. Most important, our plan is set for 10 years so our partners can focus on delivering infrastructure for Canadians over the long term.
The plan includes the $14 billion Building Canada fund which has two parts: a national infrastructure component and the provincial-territorial infrastructure component.
The national infrastructure component will support investments for major economic projects of national significance, in particular, those that support job creation, economic growth and productivity. It focuses on highways, public transit, disaster mitigation, and gateway and trade corridor infrastructure, which are very important for our country.
The provincial-territorial infrastructure component supports projects of national, regional and local significance such as highways, public transit, drinking water, waste water, connectivity and broadband, and innovation, for example.
In addition, we have also provided another $1.25 billion over five years to renew the P3 Canada fund. The renewal of the P3 Canada fund will continue to support innovative ways to build infrastructure projects in the country. Public-private partnerships can achieve greater savings and efficiency in the delivery of much needed infrastructure projects, which will provide better value for Canadian taxpayers.
Let us not forget that in Canada, as I mentioned earlier, the vast majority of core public infrastructure is indeed owned by municipalities, provinces and territories, with the balance, less than one-tenth, owned by the federal government.
The biggest part of our plan is the community improvement fund, which includes $21.8 billion for the gas tax fund transfer. This is permanent, stable, predictable funding. There is another change, one that has been repeatedly asked for by municipal leaders, a change that will keep it growing. The gas tax fund transfer is now indexed so municipalities will not be penalized as inflation grows.
The program is also more flexible than ever before. It will continue to support community infrastructure projects such as roads, public transit and recreational facilities, and we have doubled the number of eligible categories. Gas tax transfers will now also support projects in categories such as culture, tourism, sport and recreation, disaster mitigation, broadband communication systems and local and regional airports.
We have a flexible plan that lets local councils set their own local priorities. For example, many cities have focused on transit. Thus far, more than one-quarter of the gas tax fund has been directed to public transit projects. That is $2 billion in transit funding since 2006 from just one program.
In five of Canada's largest cities, all or nearly all of the gas tax transferred goes toward public transit. We did not decide to invest there, municipalities did, but we ensured it was an eligible category based on our discussions with our municipal partners.
Other municipalities have other priorities that also fit within the parameters of the programs we have collectively built together.
That is how we do business. We consult our partners and we are in constant contact with them. More than one-quarter of the federal gas tax fund has been invested in local roads and bridges to date, while 16% of the gas tax fund has gone to water and over 10% has been used for waste water.
Across Canada, local councils are making the right choices for their communities, and we are happy to help them make this important progress. Let us not forget that provinces, territories and municipalities are ultimately responsible for building, expanding, maintaining, rehabilitating and operating almost all of Canada's public infrastructure. As a result, provinces, territories and municipalities are also best positioned to identify their own investments for local and regional needs and priorities.
Let us recap. The municipalities asked for more flexibility. Let us look at those 18 gas tax fund categories. They asked for a long-term plan: the plan is a decade long. They asked for more funding: we gave them $53 billion over the next decade. They asked us to index the gas tax fund: indexing is in the new plan.
We did not waste any time implementing this new plan with our partners either. Important projects worth more than an estimated $5 billion in total project costs have already been approved and identified for funding under the new Building Canada fund. These projects contribute to getting goods to market, to connecting people and businesses with the world, and to reducing gridlock on our roads and highways, which in turn boosts our productivity and competitiveness. This includes projects such as the Valley Line stage one light rail transit expansion in Edmonton, water and wastewater projects across Manitoba, improvements to Nova Scotia's 100 series highway systems, and our recently announced funding for key upgrades to the Port of Montreal.
This spirit of co-operation has taken us a long way and will be even more essential as we go forward. We worked shoulder-to-shoulder to develop a long-term infrastructure plan that meets the needs of Canadian citizens from coast to coast. Now we are working together with the provinces and municipalities to implement that plan.
Going forward, strong partnerships will remain key to continued investments and world-class modern infrastructure across Canada. Through these investments, and in partnership with the provinces, territories, and municipalities, we are delivering results, not just talking, as the opposition does. We are delivering results that matter to Canadians, such as a stronger economy, a cleaner environment, and a more prosperous and vibrant Canada with more prosperous and vibrant communities.
We look forward to this continued collaboration, to continued action, and to continued results.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2014-09-22 14:42 [p.7647]
Mr. Speaker, I see that the Liberals did not have the opportunity over the summer to attend summer school to brush up on their math skills. It was only the summer of love over there, perhaps.
The new Building Canada plan is open for business. This is the most significant investment in infrastructure in our nation's history. We are working closely with our municipal and provincial partners. Applications are being received and being approved, including the twinning of Highway 16 in Saskatchewan.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2014-06-19 14:42 [p.7167]
I will begin by suggesting, Mr. Speaker, that this Conservative government has no lessons to take from Liberals with respect to infrastructure investments.
Since 2006, our investments in infrastructure have nearly tripled. Moving forward, those record investments will continue: over $53 billion in stable, predictable funding.
There are no framework agreements. Yes, that is correct. There are no framework agreements because none are required. Let us get the job done.
View Peter Braid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Peter Braid Profile
2014-06-19 14:51 [p.7169]
Mr. Speaker, the new Building Canada fund is open for business. The new Building Canada fund includes the provincial and territorial infrastructure component. This is where municipalities can apply for projects. They initially apply to provinces. Provinces establish these processes. Why? It is so that the provinces can identify their own infrastructure priorities. Applications are being received. One has already been approved. It is a major transit project in Edmonton. We are getting the job done.
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