Hansard
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 11 of 11
View Patrick Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Patrick Brown Profile
2012-05-08 17:31 [p.7758]
moved that Bill C-314, An Act respecting the awareness of screening among women with dense breast tissue, be read the third time and passed.
He said: Mr. Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to speak to Bill C-314, an act respecting the awareness of screening among women with dense breast tissue, for the final hour of debate in the House.
Bill C-314 calls on the federal government to encourage the use of existing federal initiatives in order to increase awareness among Canadian women about dense breast tissue and the implications for breast cancer screening.
Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among women. It claims many lives, and many deaths can be avoided through screening and early detection.
This year alone about 23,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 5,000 women will die from this disease. That represents about 450 women diagnosed each week. This situation is difficult to accept. It affects women and their loved ones profoundly.
For women with dense breast tissue, breast cancer is generally harder to detect using mammography, resulting in the need for more frequent screening.
Raising awareness about dense breast tissue is important for Canadian women. Through the bill we can raise awareness of breast cancer screening for women with dense breast tissue. Greater awareness and information about dense breast tissue is a tangible way we can make a difference. It would help women and their doctors make well-informed decisions regarding breast cancer screening. For these reasons I will ask my colleagues to continue to show their support for the passage of the bill.
Bill C-314 would support a number of initiatives that the federal government already has under way to support early detection and screening of breast cancer.
As noted in the bill, the federal government plays a role in facilitating the sharing of best practices and information on screening, as well as supporting research through its programs and networks. Building on existing initiatives, the bill is focused on raising awareness in several ways.
First, the bill requires the government to determine if there are breast density information gaps in relation to breast cancer screening. Through research we can investigate the full spectrum of cancer prevention and control, including breast cancer.
In this regard, the federal government's cancer research investments through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, or CIHR, are serving to fill some research gaps. Through the CIHR, the federal government is supporting research on more effective diagnostic treatment and prevention for all cancers, including breast cancer. In 2010-11, $171 million was spent on cancer research, and $22.7 million was spent for breast cancer research.
These research investments are supporting important scientific work. In particular, CIHR's Institute for Cancer Research is supporting research that will lead to reducing the burden of cancer on individuals and families through improved prevention efforts. It has placed a priority on research concerning early cancer detection, and it is working with partners to advance this research priority.
For instance, the institute is currently exploring partnerships with groups such as the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation and the Breast Cancer Society of Canada, and it would include efforts in early detection as part of this focus. The institute is looking at targeted funding for research on the early detection of cancer, including breast cancer, to address information gaps. Scientific research such as this is helping to improve screening and is helping to raise awareness about the challenges related to breast cancer screening.
In addition, to raise awareness, the second element of the bill requires that approaches be identified, as needed, to improve information for women in order to, first, address the challenges of detecting cancer in women with dense tissue and, second, raise awareness concerning these challenges.
In response to the bill, the government will continue to raise awareness about breast density and its screening implications through the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative. This initiative respects the role of provincial and territorial programs and the role they play in early detection of breast cancer among Canadian women. Through it, we are working with the provincial and territorial governments to measure screening program performance nationwide and to develop better screening approaches.
The Canadian breast cancer screening initiative supports the good work already under way with our provinces and territories. By facilitating information-sharing about breast cancer screening across Canada, the initiative can achieve its goal of evaluating and improving the quality of organized breast cancer screening programs.
The Canadian breast cancer screening initiative is helping raise awareness about cancer screening, including screening for women with dense breast tissue. By building upon best practices and lessons learned, breast cancer screening programs can be improved and strengthened across the country.
The third element of the bill even more directly relates to the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative. The bill would require the existing Canadian breast cancer screening initiative to share information on dense breast tissue and its relationship to breast cancer screening and any follow-up procedures that may be necessary. The follow-up procedures are a pretty important part of this.
Sharing information about ways to improve cancer screening programs ensures women receive the full benefits of early detection, including information about all aspects of breast cancer screening.
We must sustain this collaboration and collective assessment of breast cancer screening programs. In this regard, the government has established a federal, provincial and territorial national committee for the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative, which also includes medical professionals and key stakeholders.
This is a platform for engagement. It provides opportunity for governments to work together on screening recommendations and approaches. For example, the national committee is currently looking at breast cancer mortality and improving screening for underserved populations. This committee encourages the sharing and pooling of information. This is a basis for a balanced set of protocols across Canada, based on best practices. There is no monopoly on a good idea, and an effective screening mechanism in one part of the country can easily be adopted in another part of Canada.
In addition to the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative, the government has also established a national repository on breast cancer screening. This national database is housed and administered by the Public Health Agency of Canada. Information is provided by provinces and territories and rolled up into a biannual report to Canadians on new cases of breast cancer and cancer deaths. The report also contains data on participation in organized screening programs, mammography use and follow-up.
In line with the bill, the database would include breast density information in the future. This is an important addition to the repository. In turn, information would be provided to Canadians on this important issue.
The Canadian breast cancer screening initiative would continue to provide a decision-making tool for women. It, too, would include information on breast density.
All this good work is helping build awareness and understanding of the effects of breast cancer screening on breast cancer survival rates and other important issues.
In sum, the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative is an invaluable collaborative effort. It accesses new information about screening on a regular basis; it ensures that programs and policies are informed by the most up-to-date information; and it provides good information to help Canadians and to help professionals make the best possible decisions about breast cancer screening.
The bill also recognizes the important work done by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer on cancer prevention and control, more generally. Our government established the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer in 2006 to implement the Canadian strategy for cancer control. In March 2010, we renewed its funding, investing $250 million for another five years.
The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer is an independent, not-for-profit corporation. Its work includes prevention, early detection, treatment and support for Canadians living with cancer, and it involves many players, such as cancer experts, charitable organizations, government cancer agencies, national health organizations, patient survivors and others. Our investments in the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer help provide women with up-to-date information on breast cancer screening.
Recently, the bill was discussed at length in committee and a number of experts and witnesses shared their stories with us. I thought I would share a few.
Ms. Feather Janz detected a lump in her breast at age 20. However, despite going for numerous tests, cancer was not detected. She was finally diagnosed with highly aggressive grade three breast cancer at the age of 23. She underwent a radical surgery and her left breast was removed.
About 12 years later, Feather started to feel that her remaining breast was not quite right. Over the next four years, she continually went for mammograms but, again, nothing was detected.
The reports contained notations like “high dense breast tissue”, “too dense”, “quite dense” and “not able to see any abnormalities”. That is all the reports said. Feather insisted on surgery to have the other breast removed, and after the procedure the pathology report stated that it, indeed, had been a case of advanced aggressive breast cancer that had already spread to her lymph nodes. Feather told the committee she was shocked when she found out that the likely reason for this happening, and her life being threatened due to it, was because of dense breast tissue.
Another example is Mr. Bruce Cole, who testified before the committee about his wife, Sharon, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 36 and passed away at 40. Bruce Cole is from the same region of the country that I come from, Simcoe County. Mr. Cole talked about the incredible tragedy of losing his wife, who left behind children aged 17, 15 and 13. Her family had no history of this terrible disease and Mr. Cole testified that, regrettably, his wife did not have access to the screening technology and the knowledge we have today.
Since Sharon's tragic death, Bruce has been very active with the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation as a donor and volunteer, and he attended the world forum on breast cancer last June in Hamilton. Bruce urged the committee to pass Bill C-314. He said it would help improve the quality of information to women as part of Canada's organized breast screening programs. Bruce knows this bill would help raise women's awareness about breast density and its implications for their health.
Bruce correctly pointed out to us that digital mammography or MRI are more effective than screen-film mammography at detecting breast cancer in dense breast tissue like his wife had, and he emphasized the need for sharing information between the Public Health Agency of Canada and the provincial and territorial governments. Sadly, Bruce understands that his wife might be here today if these practices had been in place when Sharon needed them most, but he bravely soldiers on, fighting this battle in her memory.
With all of us working together, we can improve screening and early detection and provide important information to women, health care professionals and Canadians. Bill C-314 calls on us to do exactly that. By passing this bill, we can ensure awareness is raised about breast cancer screening for women with dense breast tissue. We can ensure that existing initiatives assist women and health care professionals in making well-informed decisions regarding screening. Raising awareness about breast cancer screening can lead to early detection, and early detection can save lives.
For these reasons, I encourage all members of the House to support my bill, and I sincerely hope that it will go a long way in helping to save more lives in the future.
I know this is something Canadians care passionately about. Every October the breast cancer walk is held in communities across Canada. In my home town, Barrie, there is a sea of pink, people walking on the shores of Kempenfelt Bay to support breast cancer research. This is a way to support the collective will of Canadians who say they want us to act and make a tangible difference in fighting breast cancer.
propose que le projet de loi C-314, Loi concernant la sensibilisation au dépistage chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense, soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
-- Monsieur le Président, je suis heureux de prendre la parole au sujet du projet de loi C-314, Loi concernant la sensibilisation au dépistage chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense, pendant la dernière heure du débat à la Chambre.
Le projet de loi C-314 demande au gouvernement d'encourager le recours à des initiatives existantes afin de sensibiliser davantage les Canadiennes à la densité mammaire et à ses conséquences dans le dépistage du cancer du sein.
Le cancer du sein est la forme de cancer la plus répandue chez les femmes. Il cause de nombreux décès, dont plusieurs pourraient être évités grâce au dépistage précoce.
Cette année, environ 23 000 femmes recevront un diagnostic de cancer du sein, et 5 000 femmes en mourront. Cela signifie qu'approximativement 450 femmes reçoivent un tel diagnostic chaque semaine. C'est une nouvelle difficile à accepter. Elle bouleverse profondément les femmes atteintes et leurs proches.
Quand une femme a un tissu mammaire dense, il est généralement plus difficile de détecter un cancer du sein au moyen d'une mammographie. Elle doit donc subir des dépistages plus fréquents.
Il est important de sensibiliser les Canadiennes au tissu mammaire dense. Grâce au projet de loi, nous pourrons promouvoir le dépistage du cancer du sein chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense. C'est en sensibilisant et en informant la population à ce sujet que nous pourrons vraiment changer les choses. Les femmes et leur médecin pourront ainsi prendre des décisions éclairées sur le dépistage du cancer du sein. C'est pourquoi je demande à mes collègues de continuer à appuyer l'adoption du projet de loi.
Le projet de loi C-314 soutiendrait un certain nombre d'initiatives déjà mises en oeuvre par le gouvernement fédéral à l'appui du dépistage précoce du cancer du sein.
Comme il est souligné dans le projet de loi, le gouvernement fédéral facilite le partage des pratiques exemplaires et la communication de l'information sur les méthodes de dépistage et il appuie la recherche grâce aux programmes et aux réseaux dont il dispose. Le projet de loi prend comme assise les initiatives existantes et met l'accent sur la sensibilisation, qui sera effectuée de différentes façons.
Premièrement, le projet de loi exige que le gouvernement détermine s'il existe des lacunes dans l'information sur la densité mammaire dans le contexte du dépistage du cancer du sein. Grâce à la recherche, nous pouvons étudier tous les aspects de la prévention du cancer et de la lutte contre cette maladie, y compris contre le cancer du sein.
À cet égard, les fonds accordés par le gouvernement fédéral pour la recherche sur le cancer aux Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada permettent de combler une partie des lacunes en matière de recherche. Par l'intermédiaire des instituts, le gouvernement fédéral appuie la recherche visant à améliorer l'efficacité du diagnostic et de la prévention de tous les cancers, y compris le cancer du sein. En 2010-2011, au total, 171 millions de dollars ont été investis dans la recherche sur le cancer, et 22 millions ont été investis dans la recherche sur le cancer du sein.
Ces investissements dans la recherche financent d'importants travaux scientifiques. Plus particulièrement, l'Institut du cancer des IRSC finance des recherches qui permettront de réduire l'incidence du cancer sur les victimes et leurs proches en améliorant la prévention. L'institut accorde la priorité à la recherche sur la détection précoce du cancer et il travaille avec ses partenaires de façon à faire progresser en priorité les travaux dans ce sens.
Par exemple, l'institut étudie actuellement la possibilité de créer des partenariats avec des groupes comme la Fondation canadienne du cancer du sein et la Société du cancer du sein du Canada, et les travaux sur la détection précoce feraient partie de cette approche. L'institut cherche à cibler le financement pour la recherche sur la détection précoce du cancer, y compris le cancer du sein, pour combler les lacunes en matière d'information. Ce genre de recherche scientifique contribue à améliorer le dépistage et à sensibiliser la population au défi que pose le dépistage du cancer du sein.
De plus, pour accroître la sensibilisation, le deuxième élément du projet de loi exige l'établissement, au besoin, de façons d'améliorer l'information fournie aux femmes afin, d'une part, de surmonter les difficultés liées au dépistage du cancer du sein chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense et, d'autre part, d'accroître la sensibilisation à ces difficultés.
En réaction à ce projet de loi, le gouvernement continuera à sensibiliser la population aux conséquences de la densité mammaire sur le dépistage par l'intermédiaire de l'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein. Cette initiative respecte le mandat des programmes provinciaux et territoriaux et leur rôle dans la détection précoce du cancer du sein chez les Canadiennes. Dans le cadre de cette initiative, nous travaillons avec les gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux pour mesurer le rendement des programmes de dépistage à l'échelle nationale et élaborer de meilleures méthodes de dépistage.
L'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein appuie le bon travail qui est déjà en cours avec les provinces et les territoires. En facilitant la diffusion de l'information sur le dépistage du cancer du sein dans l'ensemble du pays, elle peut atteindre son objectif visant à évaluer et à améliorer la qualité des programmes organisés de dépistage du cancer du sein.
L’Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein permet de sensibiliser la population au dépistage du cancer, y compris chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense. En nous fondant sur les pratiques exemplaires et les leçons apprises, nous pouvons améliorer et renforcer les programmes de dépistage du cancer du sein dans l'ensemble du pays.
Le troisième élément du projet de loi est lié encore plus directement à l'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein. Le projet de loi exigerait que l'on communique, par l'entremise de l’Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein, de l'information sur la détection du tissu mammaire dense durant le dépistage, mais aussi à toutes les étapes du suivi. Les méthodes de suivi sont très importantes.
Communiquer de l'information sur les façons d'améliorer les programmes de dépistage du cancer permet aux femmes de bénéficier de tous les avantages d'un dépistage précoce, et notamment de se renseignements sur les différents aspects du dépistage du cancer du sein.
Nous devons maintenir cette collaboration et poursuivre l'évaluation collective des programmes de dépistage du cancer du sein. C'est pourquoi le gouvernement a créé le Comité fédéral, provincial et territorial de l'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein. Ce comité regroupe des professionnels de la santé et les principaux intéressés.
C'est une plateforme d'engagement. Le comité permet aux gouvernements de collaborer à l'élaboration de recommandations et d'approches pour le dépistage. En guise d'exemple, il se penche en ce moment sur la mortalité attribuable au cancer du sein et sur l'amélioration du dépistage dans les populations mal desservies. Le comité encourage la communication et la mise en commun de l'information. Il sera ainsi possible d'établir, dans l'ensemble du pays, des protocoles équilibrés fondés sur des pratiques exemplaires. Personne n'a le monopole des bonnes idées. Si un mécanisme de dépistage efficace est utilisé dans une partie du pays, il peut facilement être adopté dans une autre.
En plus de l'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein, le gouvernement a aussi créé un dépositaire national sur la question. Cette base de données est hébergée et administrée par l'Agence de la santé publique du Canada. Les provinces et les territoires l'alimentent, et l'information est colligée en un rapport bisannuel sur les nouveaux cas de cancer du sein et les décès dus au cancer. Le rapport contient aussi de l'information sur la participation aux programmes de dépistage, l'utilisation de la mammographie et les procédures de suivi.
À l'avenir, la base de données comprendra des données sur la densité mammaire, ce qui va dans le sens du projet de loi. Il s'agit d'un ajout important, qui permettra d'informer les Canadiens sur cette importante question.
L'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein continuera à aider les femmes à prendre des décisions. Elle comprendra dorénavant des renseignements sur la densité mammaire.
Tout ce travail sert à sensibiliser les gens et à accroître leur compréhension des effets du dépistage du cancer du sein sur le taux de survie ainsi que sur d'autres questions importantes.
Bref, l'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein est le fruit d'un précieux effort de collaboration. Elle obtient régulièrement de nouveaux renseignements au sujet du dépistage. Elle fait en sorte que les programmes et les politiques soient élaborées à partir des plus récents renseignements. Elle fournit de l'information pertinente aux Canadiens et aux professionnels de la santé pour les aider à prendre les meilleures décisions possibles au sujet du dépistage du cancer du sein.
Le projet de loi reconnaît également le travail important effectué par le Partenariat canadien contre le cancer, en matière de prévention et de lutte contre le cancer, de façon plus générale. Notre gouvernement a établi le partenariat en 2006 pour mettre en oeuvre la Stratégie canadienne de lutte contre le cancer. En mars 2010, nous avons renouvelé son financement, en investissant 250 millions de dollars pour cinq années additionnelles.
Le Partenariat canadien contre le cancer est un organisme indépendant à but non lucratif qui met entre autres l'accent sur la prévention, la détection précoce et le traitement et qui offre de l'aide aux Canadiens atteints du cancer. Il compte de nombreux intervenants, dont des spécialistes du cancer, des organismes de bienfaisance, des agences gouvernementales de lutte contre le cancer, des organismes de santé nationaux et des patients qui ont survécu. Nos investissements dans le Partenariat canadien contre le cancer aident à offrir aux femmes de l'information à jour sur le dépistage du cancer du sein.
Le projet de loi a récemment fait l'objet de discussions approfondies au comité et plusieurs experts et témoins nous ont raconté leurs histoires. J'ai pensé vous faire part de quelques-unes d'entre elles.
Mme Feather Janz s'est trouvé une bosse dans un sein à l'âge de 20 ans. Elle a passé une batterie de tests, mais aucun cancer n'a été dépisté. On lui a finalement appris à l'âge de 23 ans qu'elle avait un virulent cancer du sein de stade trois. Elle a subi une chirurgie radicale au cours de laquelle on lui a amputé le sein gauche.
Environ 12 ans plus tard, Feather a commencé à sentir qu'il y avait quelque chose d'anormal avec son autre sein. Elle a subi régulièrement des mammographies pendant les quatre années qui ont suivi, mais on n'a encore une fois rien dépisté.
Les rapports étaient assortis de notes disant « tissu mammaire très dense », « trop dense », « relativement dense », « impossible de voir d'anomalies ». C'est tout ce que disaient les rapports. Feather a insisté qu'on fasse l'ablation de son autre sein; après l'opération, le pathologiste a indiqué dans son rapport que, en effet, le tissu était atteint d'un cancer agressif à un stade avancé qui avait déjà atteint les ganglions lymphatiques. Feather a dit au comité qu'elle était abasourdie d'apprendre que ce qui était probablement à l'origine de ces épreuves et qui avait mis sa vie en danger était lié à la densité de son tissu mammaire.
Il y a également l'exemple de Bruce Cole, qui a parlé au comité de sa femme, Sharon, décédée à l'âge de 40 ans, quatre ans après avoir reçu un diagnostic de cancer du sein. Bruce Cole et moi venons de la même région, le comté de Simcoe. Monsieur Cole a parlé du grand drame qu'il a vécu lorsqu'il a perdu sa femme, qui laissait derrière elle ses enfants âgés de 17, 15 et 13 ans. Il n'y avait aucun antécédent de cette terrible maladie dans sa famille et M. Cole a dit au comité que, malheureusement, sa femme n'avait pas accès aux connaissances et à la technologie de dépistage que l'on connaît aujourd'hui.
Depuis le décès tragique de Sharon, Bruce travaille de près avec la Fondation canadienne du cancer du sein à titre de donateur et de bénévole, et il a assisté au forum mondial sur le cancer du sein en juin dernier à Hamilton. Bruce exhortait le comité à adopter le projet de loi C-314. Il a dit que, dans le cadre des programmes organisés de dépistage, les femmes auraient accès à des renseignements de meilleure qualité. Il sait que le projet de loi sensibiliserait les femmes à la question de la densité du tissu mammaire et de son incidence sur la santé.
Bruce nous a fait remarquer, avec raison, que la mammographie numérique ou l'IRM est plus efficace que la mammographie à film radiographique pour détecter les tumeurs cancéreuses dans les tissus mammaires denses, comme sa femme en avait, et a souligné la nécessité que l'Agence de santé publique du Canada et les gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux partagent leurs renseignements. Malheureusement, Bruce comprend que sa femme serait peut-être encore vivante aujourd'hui si ces pratiques avaient été en vigueur lorsque Sharon en avait le plus besoin, mais il persévère malgré tout, menant ce combat en sa mémoire.
Ensemble, nous pouvons non seulement améliorer le dépistage et la détection précoce, mais fournir de l'information importante aux femmes, aux professionnels de la santé et aux Canadiens. C'est exactement le but visé par le projet de loi C-314. En adoptant ce projet de loi, nous pourrons sensibiliser davantage la population au dépistage du cancer du sein chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense. En outre, nous garantissons que les initiatives existantes aident les femmes et les fournisseurs de soins de santé à prendre des décisions éclairées relativement au dépistage. La sensibilisation au dépistage du cancer du sein peut favoriser la détection précoce, et la détection précoce peut sauver des vies.
C'est pourquoi j'encourage tous les députés à appuyer mon projet de loi. J'espère sincèrement qu'il permettra de sauver plus de vies à l'avenir.
Je sais que cet enjeu intéresse les Canadiens au plus haut point. Chaque année, au mois d'octobre, des collectivités partout au Canada organisent une marche pour appuyer la recherche sur le cancer du sein. Dans ma ville natale, Barrie, une marée de gens vêtus de rose marche au bord de la baie Kempenfelt pour appuyer la recherche sur le cancer du sein. C'est pour eux une façon d'apporter leur soutien à la volonté collective des Canadiens qui veulent que nous agissions et obtenions des résultats tangibles dans la lutte contre le cancer du sein.
View Patrick Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Patrick Brown Profile
2012-05-08 17:46 [p.7761]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from the health committee for the question, and the New Democrats for their support for this bill. It is much appreciated and an example of how we can work collaboratively in this House.
New technology is critically important to the health care system. That testimony was invaluable. There are technologies out there that can 100% detect breast cancer. If women have dense breasts, in many cases, mammography is not accurate, but we know that an ultrasound or an MRI can accurately show if there is breast cancer. However, we did hear testimony about technology beyond ultrasound or MRI. That is the exciting thing about health care. As much as the system is challenged in many ways, technological advancements are a great way to deal with these challenges. I am happy to see our health committee studying technology in health care, because it opens the door for advancements in health services.
This bill does not deal directly with new technology, but by sharing best practices, it opens the door for that conversation. Obviously, we cannot have verbal recommendations saying “Spend money on this” in a private member's bill. However, that collaborative approach with the provinces and that best practices format, if there is a technology that is utilized in Newfoundland, perhaps will allow the provinces to rapidly work together to have these new technologies adopted in every health care system.
That is one of the measures that the bill focuses on, that collaborative approach among the provinces, territories and the federal government to ensure the best possible health care delivery throughout Canada.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie ma consoeur du Comité de la santé de sa question. Je suis également fort reconnaissant aux néo-démocrates d'appuyer le projet de loi, comme quoi il est possible de collaborer dans cette enceinte.
L'évolution technologique joue un rôle capital dans le système de santé. Le témoignage évoqué par la députée a été inappréciable. Il existe des appareils qui peuvent détecter absolument tous les cancers du sein. Lorsqu'une femme a une forte densité mammaire, la mammographie, contrairement à l'échographie ou à l'IRM, ne permet souvent pas de bien détecter la présence de ce type de cancer. Or, des témoins ont évoqué des méthodes plus poussées que le dépistage par échographie ou par IRM. Voilà la beauté des soins de santé: même si le système connaît des difficultés, les progrès technologiques permettent de les surmonter. Je suis ravi que notre Comité de la santé se penche sur les appareils employés en santé, qui ouvrent la porte à des progrès au chapitre des soins.
Le projet de loi ne porte pas expressément sur les nouveaux appareils, mais par la mise en commun de pratiques exemplaires, il ouvre la porte au dialogue à leur sujet. De toute évidence, un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire ne permet pas de recommander de consacrer de l'argent à telle ou telle chose. Toutefois, l'approche collaborative avec les provinces et le format fondé sur les pratiques exemplaires feront peut-être en sorte que, par exemple, si un appareil est utilisé à Terre-Neuve, les autres provinces pourront faire équipe rapidement afin que leur système de santé respectif adopte le même.
Voilà l'une des mesures que cible le projet de loi: la collaboration entre les provinces, les territoires et le gouvernement fédéral afin d'assurer la prestation des meilleurs soins possible d'un bout à l'autre du Canada.
View Patrick Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Patrick Brown Profile
2012-05-08 18:17 [p.7765]
Mr. Speaker, I am thankful for all of the comments so far in the House on this debate. I thank the member for St. Catharines for his eloquent comments on this. It is great to have such a hard-working colleague, like the member for St. Catharines, support this bill.
There were some concerns raised by the member for Vancouver Centre from the Liberal Party. I realize that her submission was that there should be language that said “a best clearing house”. I just want to explain that, as much as we appreciated her amendment and suggestions, we felt that the language was already in the bill.
However, I am heartened that members of the official opposition have supported this bill throughout the process and that the member for St. Paul's, who initially spoke to the bill on behalf of the Liberal Party, did so enthusiastically. I think these are the types of issues we can rally behind. There was no intention to ignore the amendment from the member for Vancouver Centre. It is just that the language was already there. I am a big believer that it is important that we not be redundant in terms of having multiple paragraphs in a bill that stipulate and say the exact same thing.
I believe we have a bill that works in the best interests of breast cancer patients. The reason I selected this as a topic to push here in the House of Commons is because where I come from in Barrie, for the entire time that I have been involved in elected politics, and I was elected to city council in 2000, the number one issue in Barrie was building our cancer centre. it will finally open on May 17 but it has been an 11-year fundraising campaign and something that I know is incredibly important to Simcoe county. When I asked members of the community what type of bill I should work on, the resounding response was something cancer related. This is something that our community has really rallied behind.
Members of the medical community and friends here in Ottawa who worked within Health Canada gave me suggestions but this was a suggestion we thought we could tangibly make progress on and tangibly move forward. I really believe this is an issue that is not partisan at all. It is an issue that every party can get behind and support because when it comes to trying to increase the survival percentages of breast cancer patients, it is something that is important to every community in Canada.
There has been tremendous progress in Canada. Having survival rates of 80% is an accomplishment for Canada but I believe we can go even beyond that. Embracing new technology, raising awareness and ensuring that we have best practices across Canada for dense breast tissue will enable us to reach new levels of success in beating breast cancer.
I appreciate the support of my colleagues in the House and I hope it will pass in this House very shortly.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie tous ceux qui ont pris la parole jusqu'à maintenant. Je remercie notamment le député de St. Catharines de ses propos éloquents sur cette initiative. C'est bien de voir un collègue qui travaille aussi fort que le député de St. Catharines appuyer le projet de loi.
La députée libérale de Vancouver Quadra a soulevé certaines préoccupations. Je suis conscient que, selon elle, le libellé devrait inclure une allusion à un centre d'information où seraient consignées les pratiques exemplaires. Je veux simplement dire que, même si nous lui sommes très reconnaissants de son amendement et de ses suggestions, nous avons jugé que le projet de loi incluait déjà ce libellé.
Par ailleurs, je suis heureux que les députés de l'opposition officielle aient appuyé le projet de loi tout au long du processus et que la députée de St. Paul's, qui a initialement pris la parole au nom du Parti libéral, l'ait fait avec autant d'enthousiasme. Je pense que c'est le genre de dossier derrière lequel nous pouvons tous nous rallier. Nous n'avions pas l'intention de laisser de côté l'amendement proposé par la députée de Vancouver Quadra. Si nous l'avons fait, c'est tout simplement parce que le libellé existait déjà. Je crois fermement qu'il faut éviter les redondances créées en ayant plusieurs dispositions du projet de loi qui disent la même chose.
Je crois que ce projet de loi sert les intérêts des femmes atteintes du cancer du sein. Si j'ai choisi de présenter un projet de loi sur cette question à la Chambre, c'est qu'à Barrie, où j'habite, la construction du centre de cancérologie a constamment retenu l'attention des citoyens depuis 2000, c'est-à-dire depuis que j'ai été élu au conseil municipal, ce qui a marqué mon entrée en politique. Le centre a finalement ouvert ses portes le 17 mai, après 11 ans de campagnes de financement. Je sais qu'il revêt beaucoup d'importance pour les gens du comté de Simcoe. Quand je leur ai demandé à quel genre de projet de loi je pourrais travailler, ils m'ont répondu haut et fort que je devrais me concentrer sur le cancer. Notre collectivité s'est vraiment ralliée à cette cause.
Des membres du milieu médical et certains de mes amis qui travaillent à Santé Canada, ici à Ottawa, m'ont fait des suggestions. Nous avons retenu la question de la densité mammaire parce que nous étions convaincus de pouvoir réaliser des progrès tangibles pour faire avancer cette cause. Je suis fermement convaincu que cette mesure n'a rien de partisan. C'est une mesure que tous les partis peuvent appuyer, puisque les efforts qu'on déploie pour augmenter le taux de survie des patientes atteintes de cancer du sein sont d'une grande importance pour toutes les collectivités du Canada.
Des progrès considérables ont été réalisés au Canada. Un taux de survie de 80 p. 100 est excellent, mais je crois que nous pouvons faire encore mieux. Si nous adoptons la nouvelle technologie, sensibilisons davantage la population et appliquons des pratiques exemplaires dans tout le Canada en ce qui concerne le dépistage chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense, nous réussirons encore mieux à vaincre le cancer du sein.
Je remercie mes collègues de leur appui et j'espère que la Chambre adoptera le projet de loi sous peu.
View Patrick Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Patrick Brown Profile
2012-03-14 18:50 [p.6317]
moved that Bill C-314, An Act respecting the awareness of screening among women with dense breast tissue, be concurred in.
propose que le projet de loi C-314, Loi concernant la sensibilisation au dépistage chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense, soit agréé.
View Patrick Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Patrick Brown Profile
2012-03-12 11:09 [p.6054]
Mr. Speaker, Bill C-314, An Act respecting the awareness of screening among women with dense breast tissue, is a piece of legislation that I have drafted because I truly want to make a difference. I want to ensure more women are aware of the impact of dense breast tissue on the analysis of a mammogram.
The bill would encourage the use of existing initiatives to increase awareness among women about the implication of dense breast tissue for breast cancer screening, and to assist women and their health care providers in making well-informed decisions regarding screening. It would recognize the work done by the provinces and territories and by many organizations in working towards these important goals. It outlines partnerships that our government has developed to enhance understanding of and to disseminate information about dense breast tissue during screening. I want to thank members from all parties for their support of this bill. I know full well that we are all anxious to ensure the bill passes as quickly as possible.
I would like to thank the hon. member for Vancouver Centre for her support and interest in this bill. She has expressed a desire to ensure best practices are disseminated. She has pointed out that Bill C-314 refers to sharing, through the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative, information related to the identification of dense breast tissue during screening and any follow-up procedures.
Indeed, the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative already helps us look at the best ways to raise awareness of dense breast tissue. The initiative also helps provide screening performance information and support evidence-based decisions.
Launched in the early 1990s, the initiative fully respects the role that provincial and territorial programs play in the early detection of breast cancer in Canadian women and the importance of sharing information and exemplary practices. In fact, it enables provinces and territories to continually share information on their screening programs, and discuss what they are learning.
To ensure strong collaboration and to work in a collective fashion to assess breast cancer screening programs, the government established the federal, provincial and territorial national committee for the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative. The committee is instrumental in providing us with the opportunity to work with provincial and territorial governments to measure screening program performance throughout the country and to develop better screening approaches.
This committee also includes non-governmental organizations, medical professionals and stakeholders. This allows for more opportunities for dissemination of practices, as well as for sharing different views. The initiative is aimed at evaluating and improving the quality of organized breast cancer screening programs. By facilitating information sharing about breast cancer screening across Canada through governments, practitioners and stakeholders, it can achieve this goal.
The bill clearly outlines the need for the Government of Canada to “encourage the use of existing programs and other initiatives that are currently supported by” the entities that have a role in breast cancer screening, be it prevention, detection, treatment, monitoring, research or the provision of information. Collaboration amongst these entities is instrumental.
Members will note that there is a great deal of good work under way through the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative. Jurisdictions are working together, sharing best practices and discussing questions that are important to them.
The amendment brought forward by the hon. member is consistent with the goals and approach of the initiative. The national committee has well-established partnerships to undertake identification and distribution of information on best practices. The committee can direct analysis on breast cancer screening, including best practices for dense breast tissue.
The dissemination of information and facilitation of use of best practices in screening in assessment are key objectives of the initiative. Provinces and territories can use this information for their respective breast cancer screening programs. The proposed amendment speaks to the need for collecting and processing information on best practices for breast cancer screening, and more specifically dense breast tissue. This is a fundamental part of the initiative. It is already enabling us, along with our provincial and territorial colleagues, to look at the best ways to raise awareness of dense breast tissue.
The Public Health Agency of Canada, through the Canadian breast cancer screening database, collects, synthesizes and distributes information on the breast density of women who are screened. It provides this information to provincial and territorial breast screening programs to support the development of best practices.
The concerns with the amendment are with regard to the word “ensuring” used in the proposed amendment. The work of the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative is not controlled by the Public Health Agency of Canada, and as such should not be ensuring the collection, processing and distribution of information or ensuring the identifying, synthesizing and distributing of information.
Therefore, while l appreciate the intention of the hon. member for Vancouver Centre, I do not see the need for this amendment. As we all want to get the bill through, I ask my fellow colleagues to continue to show support for the passage of the bill. Greater awareness and information about dense breast tissue will enable us to make a difference. It would help women and their doctors make well-informed decisions regarding breast cancer screening.
Again, I want to thank the member for Vancouver Centre for bringing this issue up. I hope all my fellow colleagues can continue to support the bill.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai rédigé le projet de loi C-314, Loi concernant la sensibilisation au dépistage chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense, parce que je souhaite vraiment changer les choses. Je tiens à ce que davantage de femmes soient conscientes des effets qu'un tissu mammaire dense peut avoir sur les mammographies.
Ce projet de loi encouragerait le recours à des initiatives existantes afin de sensibiliser davantage les femmes aux conséquences de la densité du tissu mammaire dans le dépistage du cancer du sein, ainsi que d'aider les femmes et les fournisseurs de soins de santé à prendre des décisions éclairées relativement au dépistage. Il permettrait de reconnaître le travail réalisé par les provinces et les territoires ainsi que par de nombreux organismes dans l'atteinte de ces importants objectifs. Il souligne les partenariats établis par le gouvernement dans le but d'améliorer la compréhension et de diffuser l'information concernant la densité du tissu mammaire dans le contexte des mammographies. Je tiens à remercier les députés de tous les partis pour leur appui à l'égard de ce projet de loi. Je sais très bien que nous souhaitons tous qu'il soit adopté le plus rapidement possible.
J'aimerais remercier la députée de Vancouver-Centre pour son appui et son intérêt dans ce dossier. Elle a dit souhaiter qu'on favorise la diffusion des pratiques exemplaires. Elle a souligné que le projet de loi C-314 prévoit la communication, au moyen de l’Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein, de l’information concernant la détection du tissu mammaire dense durant le dépistage et toutes méthodes de suivi.
Effectivement, l’Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein nous aide déjà à déterminer les meilleurs moyens de sensibiliser davantage les gens à la question du tissu mammaire dense. Cette initiative aide à fournir des renseignements sur le rendement des programmes de dépistage et à étayer les décisions fondées sur les preuves.
Lancée au début des années 1990, l'initiative respecte totalement le rôle que jouent les programmes provinciaux et territoriaux dans le dépistage précoce du cancer du sein parmi les Canadiennes et l'importance de la communication de l'information et des pratiques exemplaires. Elle permet en fait aux provinces et aux territoires de communiquer en permanence l'information sur leurs programmes de dépistage et de discuter leurs expériences en matière de dépistage.
Afin d'assurer la solide collaboration de tous les intervenants en ce qui concerne l'évaluation des programmes de dépistage du cancer du sein, le gouvernement a créé le Comité fédéral, provincial et territorial de l'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein. Ce comité nous permet de collaborer avec les gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux en vue de mesurer le rendement des programmes de dépistage dans l'ensemble du pays et d'élaborer de meilleures approches dans ce domaine.
Le comité est également constitué d'organisations non gouvernementales, de professionnels de la santé et d'autre parties intéressées. Cela permet une meilleure diffusion des pratiques et une meilleure communication des diverses opinions. L'initiative vise à évaluer et à améliorer la qualité des programmes organisés de dépistage du cancer du sein en facilitant le partage de l'information sur le dépistage du cancer du sein entre les différents ordres de gouvernement, les praticiens et les parties intéressées, et ce, à l'échelle du pays.
Le projet de loi précise clairement qu'il est nécessaire que le gouvernement du Canada « encourage [...] le recours aux programmes et autres initiatives existants qui sont soutenus par » les entités qui ont un rôle à jouer dans le dépistage du cancer du sein, notamment dans les domaines de la prévention, de la détection, du traitement, de la surveillance, de la recherche et de la communication de renseignements. Il est essentiel que ces entités collaborent entre elles.
Les députés constateront que d'excellents efforts sont déjà en cours dans le cadre de l'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein. Les administrations travaillent ensemble, échangent des pratiques exemplaires et discutent de questions qui sont importantes pour elles.
L'amendement proposé par la députée est conforme aux objectifs et à l'approche de l'initiative en question. Le comité national entretient des partenariats bien établis, qui lui permettent de cerner et de diffuser des renseignements sur les pratiques exemplaires. Il peut diriger l'analyse des données sur le dépistage du cancer du sein, notamment pour ce qui est des pratiques exemplaires relativement au tissu mammaire dense.
La diffusion de renseignements et la promotion des pratiques exemplaires dans le domaine du dépistage sont des objectifs clés de l'initiative. Les provinces et les territoires peuvent utiliser ces renseignements dans le cadre de leurs programmes respectifs de dépistage du cancer du sein. L'amendement proposé porte sur la nécessité de recueillir et de traiter des renseignements sur les pratiques exemplaires en matière de dépistage du cancer du sein, en particulier chez les personnes ayant un tissu mammaire dense. Il s'agit d'un élément fondamental de l'initiative, qui nous permet déjà, de concert avec nos collègues des provinces et des territoires, d'examiner les meilleures façons de sensibiliser la population au tissu mammaire dense.
Au moyen de la base de données canadienne sur le dépistage du cancer du sein, l'Agence de la santé publique du Canada recueille, résume et diffuse des renseignements sur la densité mammaire chez les femmes qui font l'objet d'un test de dépistage. Elle communique ces renseignements aux responsables des programmes provinciaux et territoriaux du dépistage du cancer, afin de les aider à élaborer des pratiques exemplaires.
Les réserves exprimées au sujet de l'amendement en question ont trait à l'expression « en assurant » utilisée dans celui-ci. Le travail réalisé dans le cadre de l'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein n'est pas contrôlé par l'Agence canadienne de la santé publique du Canada. Par conséquent, celle-ci ne devrait pas assurer la collecte, le traitement et la diffusion de renseignements, ni la synthèse de ceux-ci.
Je comprends l'intervention de la députée de Vancouver-Centre, mais je ne vois pas la nécessité d'adopter l'amendement proposé. Comme nous sommes tous en faveur de l'adoption du projet de loi, je demande aux députés de continuer d'appuyer la mesure législative. C'est en sensibilisant et en informant la population que nous pourrons changer les choses. Les femmes et leur médecin pourront ainsi prendre des décisions éclairées sur le dépistage du cancer du sein.
Je tiens à remercier encore une fois la députée de Vancouver-Centre d'avoir soulevé cette question. J'espère que tous les députés continueront d'appuyer le projet de loi.
View Patrick Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Patrick Brown Profile
2011-12-09 13:53 [p.4278]
Madam Speaker, before I get into the essence of the bill, I want to respond to a few of the comments made by the member for Scarborough—Rouge River.
This is a bill on breast cancer screening. I know she is new to this chamber, but a royal recommendation is not permitted in a private member's bill. Funding of doctors is not something one can do through a private member's bill. Therefore, I think it is inappropriate to suggest it is something that could have been added to the bill.
May I also add that it is a bit disingenuous, in the sense that the member for Scarborough—Rouge River is an active supporter of the Ontario New Democratic Party; when it was in power, for the first time in Ontario's history it cut medical enrolment, so the root challenge we face in Ontario, in her riding, exists because of the party she supported when it was in office. If we do not train and graduate doctors, we will not have them in our ridings to work on the many essential medical needs.
With regard to the bill, one in nine women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some time during their lives. According to the Canadian Cancer Society, over 24,000 Canadian women will have been diagnosed with breast cancer this year alone. Sadly, 5,000 of them will lose their fight.
Cancer care has been a critical issue to me, and when I was presented with the opportunity to present a private member's bill, I knew instantly that I wanted to do something in this field. Every year, thousands of Barrie residents in my riding participate in the CIBC Run for the Cure. It really is inspiring to see so many people who care so much about battling this insidious disease.
While putting thought to this bill, I felt it was important not only for women but for all of us to be aware of the fact that screening for breast cancer can save lives. Providing women with accurate information about screening is therefore important and will ultimately help them make decisions that are right for them. This is the essence of Bill C-314. Breast cancer is more easily treated and, in most cases, curable when found early.
Dense breast tissue is one of the top risk factors for breast cancer, and it is important for women to be informed of this fact. This can be done when they are screened for breast cancer by a mammogram, but women who have breast dense tissue should also know that the potential cancer may not be detected because it cannot be seen on a mammogram and therefore diagnosed by radiologists. It appears white on mammograms and therefore is more challenging to detect.
What Bill C-314 would do is highlight the importance of being informed and work with the provinces and territories through the national screening program in order to ensure that women receive this information.
For many women, especially young women, who have a higher incidence of dense breast tissue, having this information is essential to their decision-making process. This knowledge will provide them with the tools they need to make personal health care decisions.
Women who are informed that they have dense breast tissue may need to go for a different type of screening, such as an ultrasound or an MRI. Possible cancers may be deciphered more readily by a specialist using this type of diagnostic testing.
We are fortunate in Canada to have screening programs for breast cancer. Our provinces and territories deliver these programs to detect breast cancer early, before it has spread, so that treatment can be started. Providing more information through these programs will help women and their doctors make well-informed decisions regarding breast cancer screening. Targeting dense breast tissue is one of the means by which, through this piece of legislation, we can make a tangible difference in the fight against breast cancer.
I know too many loved ones, friends and even colleagues on the Hill, who have been touched by cancer. Through this bill I hope to not only make a difference but hopefully save lives.
I hope I can count on the members of the House to support this private member's bill, Bill C-314.
Also, I am thankful to Andrea Paine, in the Minister of Health's office, for her assistance, and I thank also Dr. Rob Ballagh, from the city of Barrie; Councillor Bonnie Ainsworth; Mike Richmond, from Toronto; and my assistant in my Barrie office, Shawn Bubel, who assisted on the drafting of this bill.
In Barrie we are building a cancer centre right now. This is one of the items I discussed with our CEO, Janice Skot. I appreciate her advice that it is this type of initiative that can really help make a difference.
Madame la Présidente, avant d'aller au coeur du projet de loi, je vais répondre à quelques-uns des commentaires formulés par la députée de Scarborough—Rouge River.
Ce projet de loi porte sur le dépistage du cancer du sein. Je sais que la députée est nouvelle à la Chambre, mais une recommandation royale n'est pas permise pour un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire. On ne peut prévoir de financement pour les médecins dans un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire. Je pense donc qu'il est inapproprié de laisser entendre que c'est quelque chose qui aurait pu être ajouté au projet de loi.
Permettez-moi d'ajouter que c'est un peu hypocrite, étant donné que la députée de Scarborough—Rouge River appuie activement le Nouveau Parti démocratique de l'Ontario. Quand celui-ci était au pouvoir, pour la première fois dans l'histoire de l'Ontario, il a limité les inscriptions dans les écoles de médecine, de sorte que le problème fondamental auquel nous devons faire face en Ontario, dans sa circonscription, existe à cause d'une décision prise par le parti qu'elle a appuyé quand il était au pouvoir. Si nous ne formons pas de médecins, nous n'en aurons pas dans nos circonscriptions pour répondre aux nombreux besoins en matière de soins.
Pour ce qui est du projet de loi, une femme sur neuf recevra un diagnostic de cancer du sein au cours de sa vie. Selon la Société canadienne du cancer, plus de 24 000 femmes canadiennes auront reçu un tel diagnostic cette année seulement. Malheureusement, 5 000 d'entre elles perdront leur combat.
J'ai toujours considéré que le cancer est une question cruciale; quand j'ai eu l'occasion de présenter un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, j'ai tout de suite su qu'il porterait sur cette question. Chaque année, des milliers d'habitants de Barrie, dans ma circonscription, participent à la Course à la vie CIBC. Il est vraiment inspirant de voir tant de personnes s'intéresser si vivement à la lutte contre cette maladie insidieuse.
Alors que je réfléchissais au projet de loi, je me suis dit qu'il était important, non seulement pour les femmes, mais pour chacun d'entre nous de comprendre que le dépistage du cancer du sein permet de sauver des vies. En fournissant aux femmes des renseignements exacts au sujet du dépistage, nous les aiderons à prendre les décisions qui conviennent à leur situation. C'est là l'essence du projet de loi C-314. Plus le cancer du sein est décelé tôt, plus il est facile à traiter et, dans la plupart des cas, à guérir.
La densité du tissu mammaire est un des principaux facteurs de risque pour le cancer du sein, et il est important que les femmes le sachent. On peut les en informer lorsqu'elle subissent une mammographie, mais les femmes qui ont un tissu mammaire dense devraient également savoir que, dans leur cas, il est plus difficile de détecter un cancer avec une mammographie, et donc plus difficile pour un radiologue d'émettre un diagnostic. Le tissu mammaire et le cancer apparaissent en blanc sur une mammographie, ce dernier est donc plus difficile à détecter.
Le projet de loi C-314 mettrait l’accent sur l’importance de bien informer les femmes et de travailler avec les provinces et les territoires, dans le cadre du programme national de dépistage, pour veiller à ce que les femmes reçoivent l’information voulue.
Pour beaucoup de femmes, et surtout pour les jeunes femmes, qui sont plus nombreuses à avoir un tissu mammaire dense, cette information est cruciale pour qu’elles puissent prendre les bonnes décisions. En sachant cela, elles seront mieux équipées pour prendre des décisions judicieuses concernant les soins nécessaires.
Les femmes à qui l’on dit qu’elles ont un tissu mammaire dense peuvent demander un autre type de dépistage, par exemple un test d’imagerie ultrasonique ou par résonance magnétique. Un spécialiste peut détecter un cancer plus facilement s’il utilise ces méthodes diagnostiques.
Nous sommes chanceux, au Canada, d’avoir des programmes de dépistage du cancer du sein. Nos provinces et territoires offrent ces programmes pour que les cancers du sein soient détectés à un stade précoce, avant qu’ils se soient propagés, et pour que les traitements puissent commencer rapidement. En diffusant plus d’information dans le cadre de ces programmes, on aidera les femmes et leurs médecins à prendre des décisions éclairées eu égard au dépistage du cancer du sein. Le fait de donner plus d’importance à la densité des tissus mammaires est l’un des moyens qu’on peut prendre, en adoptant cette mesure législative, pour lutter plus efficacement contre ce cancer.
J'ai trop d’êtres chers, d’amis et même de collègues, sur la Colline, qui ont été touchés par le cancer. En présentant ce projet de loi, j’espère que non seulement on améliorera la situation, mais qu’on sauvera des vies.
J’espère pouvoir compter sur l’appui des députés relativement à mon projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire, le projet de loi C-314.
Je tiens à remercier Andrea Paine, du cabinet de la ministre de la Santé, pour son assistance, ainsi que le Dr Rob Ballagh, de la ville de Barrie. Je remercie aussi la conseillère municipale Bonnie Ainsworth, et Mike Richmond, de Toronto. Enfin, je remercie mon assistant à mon bureau de Barrie, Shawn Bubel, qui a collaboré à la rédaction de ce projet de loi.
Un centre de traitement du cancer est actuellement en construction à Barrie. C'est l’une des questions dont j’ai discuté avec la PDG, Janice Skot. J’ai apprécié ses conseils. Selon elle, c'est le genre d’initiative qui peut vraiment contribuer à changer les choses.
View Patrick Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Patrick Brown Profile
2011-10-24 11:06 [p.2365]
moved that Bill C-314, An Act respecting the awareness of screening among women with dense breast tissue, be read the second time and referred to a committee.
He said: Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to speak to my private member's bill, Bill C-314, An Act respecting the awareness of screening among women with dense breast tissue, which calls on the federal government to encourage the use of existing federal initiatives in order to increase awareness among Canadian women about the impact of having dense breast tissue and the complications it poses for breast cancer screening.
Breast cancer touches many Canadian women and their families and friends, and is the most common form of cancer in women. I know this is something Canadians from coast to coast to coast care deeply about. Just last month Barrie held its annual CIBC Run for the Cure in support of breast cancer research. I saw 2,000 residents out early on a cold and wet Sunday morning to support the battle against breast cancer. Runs like that occur across the country because Canadians are deeply concerned.
In my community of Barrie, in less than 12 months, the Royal Victoria Hospital's regional cancer care centre will open. There have been literally thousands of fundraising events over the last five years to support this very large cancer centre. It will help battle a variety of cancers, including of course, breast cancer.
This year it is estimated that about 23,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, and 5,000 women will die from this insidious disease. Over their lifetime, one in nine women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. This is very difficult to accept. It touches many women and their loved ones. Sixty-four Canadian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 14 will die of breast cancer every day. It is my sincere hope that over time this bill will help reduce those troubling numbers. Health sectors in other areas of the world are beginning to more aggressively target dense tissue to enable early detection of breast cancer.
It is important for all of us to be aware of the fact that screening for breast cancer can save lives. Providing women with accurate information about screening will help them make decisions that are right for them. The federal government supports a number of initiatives to support Canadians dealing with cancer.
Bill C-314 aims to raise awareness about dense breast tissue and breast cancer screening. It will help women and their doctors make well-informed decisions regarding breast cancer screening. It includes a number of elements, which I will briefly outline. I will also address initiatives currently under way to address them.
First, this bill requires the Government of Canada to assess whether gaps in information exist relating to breast density in the context of breast cancer screening. Second, this bill requires that approaches be identified, where needed, to improve information for women in order to: one, address the challenges of detecting breast cancer in women with dense breast tissue; and two, raise awareness concerning these challenges. Third, the bill requires the existing Canadian breast cancer screening initiative to share information on dense breast tissue and its relationship to breast cancer screening and any follow-up procedures that may be deemed necessary.
Canada is fortunate to have screening programs for breast cancer. The provinces and territories deliver these programs to detect breast cancer before it has spread so that treatment can be started. We are learning more and more from scientific research about breast cancer and its risk factors. New and better treatments are being developed. However, there is still much to learn. We know that good information is fundamental to the decisions that each of us makes with the advice of our doctors about our own health. This dialogue is the key to doctor-patient relationships.
Let me take a few moments to explain how the issue of breast density relates to breast cancer screening. First, breast density refers to the amount of tissue in the breast. Dense breasts have more tissue. Breast cancer screening is done using a mammogram, which is an X-ray of the breast. A woman's breast density can affect the accuracy of a mammogram and it may be more difficult for a doctor to see an abnormality. There could be cancer present if the breast tissue is dense because both cancer and dense breast tissue appear white on mammograms.
High breast density is also linked to an increased risk of developing breast cancer, although it is not yet known why this is the case. We also do not know how common dense breast tissue is among Canadian women, although some statistics point to the fact that it could be as high as 40%. Providing women with information of what is known about breast density would help them make well-informed decisions about screening and would open the door for women to engage in follow-up procedures, such as an MRI or ultrasound, if they have dense breast tissue which could skew the mammogram.
In addition to raising awareness on breast density, the bill recognizes the responsibility of the provinces and territories for providing breast cancer screening. Provincial and territorial breast screening programs are invaluable in the early detection of breast cancer in Canadian women.
As noted in the bill, the federal government plays a role in breast cancer screening by facilitating the identification and adoption of effective practices in screening. We also support the sharing of information on screening methods and outcomes through our federal roles in research and surveillance.
Through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, our government provides funding to researchers to investigate the full spectrum of cancer prevention and control. One of the priorities of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research is early detection of cancer. The CIHR works with partners both nationally and internationally to advance its research priorities, including breast cancer research.
Our government has demonstrated its commitment to breast cancer screening by investing in the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative. We work with provincial and territorial governments to measure the performance of breast cancer screening programs across Canada. This means that all jurisdictions regularly share information on the screening programs and discuss what they are learning. They share best practices, discuss the challenges they are facing and the questions that are important to all of them.
Information sharing about ways to improve these programs ensures that women receive the full benefits of early detection. This includes providing women with information about all aspects of breast cancer screening. The federal, provincial and territorial national committee for the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative provides opportunities for provincial and territorial governments to work together to develop their screening recommendations and approaches. This committee is comprised of medical professionals and key stakeholders.
For example, the committee is currently looking at breast cancer mortality and improving screening for underserviced populations. We have the Canadian breast cancer screening database, which is a source of valuable information on breast cancer screening. Participating provincial and territorial screening programs contribute to the national database, which is used to monitor and evaluate breast cancer screening programs. Non-government organizations play a vital role in this process as well.
I am proud to say that our government is taking action on cancer through our continued investment in the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer which has led to the implementation of the Canadian strategy for cancer control. The partnership is the first of its kind and was established by our Conservative government. It covers the full spectrum of cancer control, from prevention to palliative and end-of-life care, policy to practice, and from research to health system applications.
Together with the cancer community, the partnership is accelerating the use of effective cancer prevention and control strategies. Its objectives are to reduce the number of cancer cases, minimize cancer-related deaths and improve patient quality of life.
In March of this year, our Prime Minister announced renewed funding of $250 million over five years, beginning on April 1, 2012. This will allow the partnership to continue its invaluable work. In the words of the Prime Minister:
We are making progress on prevention, diagnosis, treatment and hope, and in tracking our progress closely, the partnership is leading us on the path to a cure.
The partnership plays a key role in providing information to women on cancer screening, which aligns with the spirit of this bill. The bill also recognizes the important role of organizations such as the Canadian Cancer Society and the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation in providing reliable information that supports women in making decisions about their health.
All of us are familiar with the Canadian Cancer Society. This national volunteer organization works in cancer prevention, research, advocacy, information and support for all cancers.
The Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation is a national volunteer organization dedicated to working toward a future without breast cancer. The foundation funds, supports and advocates for research, education and awareness programs, early diagnosis and effective treatment, as well as a positive quality of life for those living with breast cancer.
Women's health organizations, such as the Canadian Women's Health Network, raise awareness on many health issues faced by women in Canada, including breast cancer.
Working with the above-listed breast cancer stakeholders, the federal government will continue to raise awareness through existing initiatives on the issue of breast density in the context of breast cancer screening. These stakeholders will be very critical in our battle to raise awareness about breast density.
This bill is particularly timely given that October is breast cancer awareness month. Through efforts to raise awareness, Canadian women and their families can become more informed about breast cancer. They will learn about breast density and its implications for breast cancer screening. They will be able to make well-informed decisions based on this knowledge.
I would like to thank Andrea Paine at the Ministry of Health in Ottawa, Dr. Rob Ballagh of Barrie, Mike Richmond from Toronto, and my assistant in Barrie, Shawn Bubel, for their assistance in the drafting of the bill.
The bill provides an opportunity for the Government of Canada and the House to recognize the critical importance of raising awareness about breast density and breast cancer screening.
It would be an honour for me to have the support of all members in the House for this bill. Too many families have been touched by this form of cancer. I am hopeful that by ensuring women get the information they need which could lead to early detection, this legislation could potentially save lives.
propose que le projet de loi C-314, Loi concernant la sensibilisation au dépistage chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense, soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
— Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole au sujet de mon projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, le C-314, Loi concernant la sensibilisation au dépistage chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense, qui exige du gouvernement du Canada qu’il encourage le recours aux initiatives fédérales existantes afin de sensibiliser davantage les Canadiennes aux conséquences d'un tissu mammaire dense et des complications que cette situation présente dans le dépistage du cancer du sein.
Le cancer du sein touche de nombreuses Canadiennes et leurs familles et amis et il représente la forme de cancer la plus répandue chez les femmes. Je sais que cette question tient énormément à coeur aux Canadiens d'un bout à l'autre du pays. Le mois dernier, la ville de Barrie a tenu sa Course à la vie CIBC annuelle pour appuyer la lutte contre le cancer du sein. J'ai vu 2 000 résidants se réunir tôt un dimanche matin froid et pluvieux pour manifester leur appui à la lutte contre le cancer du sein. On a organisé des courses de ce genre un peu partout au pays parce que les Canadiens sont très inquiets à ce sujet.
Dans ma collectivité, Barrie, le centre régional de soins contre le cancer de l'Hôpital Royal Victoria ouvrira ses portes dans moins de 12 mois. Au cours des cinq dernières années, des milliers d'activités de financement ont été organisées afin d'appuyer la création de ce centre très important, qui contribuera à la lutte contre diverses formes de cancer, dont, évidemment, le cancer du sein.
Cette année, on prévoit qu'environ 23 000 femmes recevront un diagnostic de cancer du sein et que 5 000 d'entre elles mourront de cette maladie insidieuse. Une femme sur neuf apprendra au cours de sa vie qu'elle est atteinte du cancer du sein. C'est une situation très difficile à accepter. Le cancer touche de nombreuses femmes et leurs êtres chers. Chaque jour, 64 Canadiennes reçoivent un diagnostic de cancer du sein et 14 d'entre elles n'y survivront pas. J'espère sincèrement qu'au fil du temps, ce projet de loi aidera à réduire ces chiffres troublants. Dans d'autres régions du monde, les secteurs de la santé commencent à cibler plus vigoureusement le tissu mammaire dense, car cela permet le dépistage précoce du cancer du sein.
Il est important que tous les députés sachent que le dépistage du cancer du sein permet de sauver des vies. En fournissant aux femmes des renseignements exacts au sujet du dépistage, nous les aiderons à prendre les décisions qui conviennent à leur situation. Le gouvernement fédéral appuie diverses initiatives visant à appuyer les Canadiens aux prises avec un cancer.
Le projet de loi C-314 vise à sensibiliser la population à la question de la densité mammaire et au dépistage du cancer du sein. Cette mesure législative aidera les femmes et leur médecin à prendre des décisions éclairées relativement au dépistage. Elle comprend plusieurs éléments que je passerai en revue rapidement. Je parlerai aussi des initiatives en cours à cet égard.
Premièrement, ce projet de loi exige que le gouvernement du Canada détermine s’il existe des lacunes dans l’information relative à la densité mammaire dans le contexte du dépistage du cancer du sein. Deuxièmement, il exige que le gouvernement établisse, au besoin, des façons d’améliorer l’information fournie aux femmes afin, d'une part, de surmonter les difficultés liées au dépistage du cancer du sein chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense, et, d'autre part, d'accroître la sensibilisation à ces difficultés. Troisièmement, le projet de loi exige que le gouvernement communique, au moyen de l’Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein, l’information concernant la détection du tissu mammaire dense durant le dépistage et toutes méthodes de suivi nécessaires.
Le Canada a la chance de bénéficier de programmes de dépistage du cancer du sein. Ce sont les provinces et les territoires qui offrent les programmes visant à détecter le cancer du sein avant qu'il ne se propage afin que les traitements puissent commencer. Grâce aux recherches scientifiques, nous en apprenons toujours davantage sur le cancer du sein et ses facteurs de risque. De nouveaux traitements plus efficaces sont mis au point. Toutefois, il nous reste encore beaucoup à apprendre sur le sujet. Nous savons que nous devons disposer de solides renseignements pour prendre des décisions éclairées en ce qui concerne notre santé, conformément aux recommandations de nos médecins. Ce dialogue est un aspect essentiel de la relation entre un médecin et son patient.
J'aimerais prendre quelques minutes pour expliquer en quoi la densité mammaire est liée au dépistage du cancer du sein. Tout d'abord, par densité mammaire, on entend la quantité de tissu dans les seins. Il y a plus de tissu dans les seins denses. On effectue le dépistage du cancer par une mammographie, qui est une radiographie du sein. La densité mammaire peut avoir des répercussions sur l'exactitude d'une mammographie et faire en sorte qu'il soit plus difficile pour un médecin de détecter une anomalie. Il pourrait y avoir un cancer si le tissu mammaire est dense, car sur une mammographie le cancer et le tissu mammaire apparaissent en blanc
Même si on n'en connaît pas encore la raison, les femmes ayant une densité mammaire élevée courent plus de risques de développer un cancer du sein. On ne connaît pas non plus la proportion de Canadiennes qui ont une densité mammaire élevée. Toutefois, selon certaines statistiques, elle pourrait s'élever à 40 p. 100. Si on communiquait aux femmes les connaissances actuelles sur la densité mammaire, elles pourraient prendre des décisions éclairées sur le dépistage du cancer. De plus, les femmes ayant une densité mammaire susceptible de fausser les résultats des mammographies pourraient avoir recours à des procédures de suivi, comme l'imagerie par résonance magnétique ou les échographies.
En plus de sensibiliser la population à la densité mammaire, le projet de loi reconnaît la responsabilité des provinces et des territoires en ce qui concerne le dépistage du cancer du sein. Les programmes provinciaux et territoriaux de dépistage sont indispensables pour détecter rapidement le cancer du sein chez les Canadiennes.
Comme on peut le lire dans le projet de loi, le gouvernement du Canada contribue aux mesures de dépistage du cancer du sein en facilitant l’établissement et l’adoption de pratiques efficaces à cet égard. Grâce au rôle qu’il joue dans la recherche et la surveillance, il favorise la communication d’information sur les méthodes de dépistage et leurs résultats.
Par le truchement des Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada, le gouvernement finance des chercheurs pour qu’ils étudient tous les aspects de la prévention du cancer et de la lutte contre cette maladie. L'une des priorités des IRSC, c'est le dépistage précoce du cancer. En collaboration avec leurs partenaires d'ici et d'ailleurs, ils font progresser leurs dossiers prioritaires, notamment la recherche en matière de cancer du sein.
Le gouvernement a prouvé sa détermination à l'égard du cancer du sein en investissant dans l'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein. En collaboration avec les gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux, il mesure l'efficacité des programmes au Canada. Ainsi, tous les gouvernements communiquent régulièrement l'information sur les programmes de dépistage et discutent des résultats. Ils mettent en commun les pratiques exemplaires, discutent des difficultés auxquelles ils doivent faire face et des questions importantes qui les touchent tous.
En échangeant de l’information sur les façons d’améliorer ces programmes, on s’assure que les femmes bénéficient de tous les avantages d’un dépistage précoce, ce qui suppose aussi qu’elles sont bien informées sur tous les aspects du dépistage du cancer du sein. Le Comité fédéral, provincial et territorial de l'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein permet aux gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux de collaborer à l’élaboration de recommandations et d’approches pour le dépistage. Ce comité regroupe des professionnels de la santé et les principaux intéressés.
En guise d’exemple, le comité se penche en ce moment sur la mortalité attribuable au cancer du sein et sur l’amélioration du dépistage dans les populations mal desservies. La base de données canadienne sur le dépistage du cancer du sein nous fournit de l’information utile sur le sujet. Les programmes de dépistage provinciaux et territoriaux participants alimentent la base de données, qui sert au suivi et à l’évaluation des programmes de dépistage du cancer du sein. Les organismes non gouvernementaux jouent aussi un rôle capital dans ce processus.
Je suis fier de dire que le gouvernement prend des mesures pour lutter contre le cancer en investissant continuellement dans le Partenariat canadien contre le cancer, qui a mené à la mise en place de la Stratégie canadienne de lutte contre le cancer. Ce partenariat est le premier en son genre et a été créé par le gouvernement conservateur. Il couvre tous les aspects de la lutte contre le cancer, de la prévention aux soins palliatifs et aux soins en fin de vie, de la politique à la pratique et de la recherche aux applications dans le système de santé.
En collaboration avec les intervenants dans ce domaine, le partenariat accélère l’application de stratégies efficaces de prévention et de lutte. Ses objectifs sont de réduire l’incidence de la maladie, de réduire le nombre de décès qui y sont attribuables et d’améliorer la qualité de vie des patients qui en sont atteints.
En mars dernier, le premier ministre a annoncé le renouvellement de son financement de 250 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, à partir du 1er avril 2012. Le partenariat pourra donc poursuivre son travail d’une grande utilité. Comme l’a dit le premier ministre:
Nous réalisons des progrès au chapitre de la prévention, du diagnostic, du traitement et de l’espoir. De plus, en suivant attentivement nos progrès, le Partenariat nous guide vers la découverte d’un remède contre cette maladie.
Le partenariat joue un rôle clé dans la transmission d’information aux femmes sur le dépistage du cancer, dans le même esprit que ce projet de loi. Le projet de loi reconnaît également le rôle important d’organismes comme la Société canadienne du cancer et la Fondation canadienne du cancer du sein dans la communication d’information fiable qui aide les femmes à prendre des décisions relativement à leur santé.
Nous connaissons tous la Société canadienne du cancer. Cet organisme national bénévole œuvre aux niveaux de la prévention, de la recherche, de la diffusion d’information et du soutien pour tous les types de cancers.
La Fondation canadienne du cancer du sein est un organisme bénévole national qui s’est donné pour but l’éradication du cancer du sein. La fondation finance, soutient et défend les programmes de recherche, d’information et de sensibilisation, de diagnostic précoce et de traitement efficace ainsi que les services pour améliorer la qualité de vie des personnes atteintes de cancer du sein.
Les organisations consacrées à la santé des femmes, comme le Réseau canadien pour la santé des femmes, ont pour but de sensibiliser le public aux divers problèmes de santé qui touchent les femmes, notamment le cancer du sein.
De concert avec les organisations déjà mentionnées, le gouvernement fédéral continuera d'avoir recours aux initiatives existantes pour sensibiliser le public à la densité mammaire dans le contexte du dépistage du cancer du sein. Ces organisations seront d'ailleurs essentielles à nos efforts de sensibilisation dans ce domaine.
Le moment choisi pour présenter ce projet de loi est particulièrement opportun, étant donné qu'octobre est le Mois de la sensibilisation au cancer du sein. Les activités organisées permettront aux Canadiennes et à leur famille de mieux s'informer sur le cancer du sein. Les Canadiennes pourront ensuite puiser dans les connaissances acquises sur la densité mammaire et ses conséquences pour le dépistage du cancer du sein pour prendre des décisions éclairées.
J'aimerais remercier Mme Andrea Paine, du ministère de la Santé, à Ottawa, le Dr Rob Ballagh, de Barrie, M. Mike Richmond, de Toronto, et mon adjoint Shawn Bubel, à Barrie, pour leur aide pendant la préparation du projet de loi.
Ce projet de loi est l'occasion parfaite pour le gouvernement du Canada et la Chambre des communes de souligner à quel point il est important de sensibiliser les gens à la densité mammaire et au dépistage du cancer du sein.
J'espère que tous les députés de la Chambre me feront l'honneur d'appuyer ce projet de loi. Ce type de cancer a touché un trop grand nombre de familles. En donnant aux femmes toute l'information dont elles ont besoin et qui pourrait mener à un dépistage précoce du cancer du sein, j'ai bon espoir que nous pourrons sauver des vies grâce à ce projet de loi.
View Patrick Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Patrick Brown Profile
2011-10-24 11:18 [p.2367]
Mr. Speaker, I am very proud that this government has worked closely with the provinces and territories to assist in enhancing health care in Canada. Let us not forget that this is the highest level of health care funding in our history to the provinces and territories through this federal government. With an increase of 6% a year we have seen record investments in health care in all areas.
The bill sets out that we would work with the provinces and territories on enhancing the breast cancer screening protocols. I am very proud of what this government has done on health care. It is not limited just to the support for the provinces and territories in this new investment, but with the Canadian cancer partnership and a variety of other partnerships this government again and again does whatever it can to enhance health care in Canada.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très fier de l'étroite collaboration du gouvernement avec les provinces et les territoires visant l'amélioration des soins de santé au Canada. N'oublions pas que le financement des soins de santé accordé par le gouvernement fédéral aux provinces et aux territoires est le plus élevé de toute l'histoire du Canada. L'augmentation de 6  p. 100 par année a permis d'investir des sommes sans précédent dans les soins de santé dans tous les domaines.
Le projet de loi prévoit que nous collaborerons avec les provinces et les territoires afin d'améliorer les protocoles de dépistage du cancer du sein. Je suis très fier de ce que le gouvernement a accompli en ce qui concerne les soins de santé. Il ne se contente pas d'appuyer les provinces et les territoires avec ce nouvel investissement, il fait tout en son pouvoir pour améliorer les soins de santé au Canada, notamment en partenariat avec la Société canadienne du cancer et différents autres intervenants.
View Patrick Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Patrick Brown Profile
2011-10-24 11:19 [p.2367]
Mr. Speaker, that is one of the benefits of the bill. It encourages the sharing and pooling of information. There is a variety of standards, but now with the provinces, territories and the federal government working on the Canadian breast cancer screening initiative, we will start to see more of a balance in terms of protocols.
I also note that the Government of Canada is investing in the CIHR for breast cancer screening. The CIHR has made that an area of interest. There are a lot of things we do not know in terms of breast cancer. That is why the research done by the CIHR is critical, as is having an active dialogue with the provinces, territories and the federal government on breast cancer. Research and surveillance are going to be very much needed as we embark on this battle against breast cancer.
Monsieur le Président, un des avantages du projet de loi, c'est d'encourager le partage et la mise en commun de l'information. Il existe diverses normes, mais maintenant que les provinces, les territoires et le gouvernement fédéral collaborent dans le cadre de l'Initiative canadienne pour le dépistage du cancer du sein, on commencera à voir une plus grande uniformisation des protocoles.
Je souligne par ailleurs que le gouvernement du Canada investit dans les IRSC pour la recherche en matière de dépistage du cancer du sein. Les IRSC en ont fait un de leurs domaines d'intérêt. Il y a beaucoup de choses que nous ignorons sur le cancer du sein. C'est pourquoi la recherche menée par les IRSC est essentielle, tout comme le fait d'établir un dialogue actif entre les provinces, les territoires et le gouvernement fédéral sur le cancer du sein. La recherche et la surveillance seront absolument nécessaires dans nos efforts pour lutter contre le cancer du sein.
View Patrick Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Patrick Brown Profile
2011-10-24 11:21 [p.2367]
Mr. Speaker, we are learning more and more about breast cancer all the time. While it was not clear before, I know that in the U.S. and a few other jurisdictions they realized there were challenges with the screening due to the fact that dense breast tissue was skewing mammogram results. Possibly as high as 40% of females have dense breast tissue, which is a huge per cent of the population that we would have inadequate information on from a mammogram. Other health care jurisdictions are embarking on new screening initiatives, and this is an opportunity for us to learn from each other. Adopting more effective practices would be a very positive step for the Canadian fight against breast cancer.
In terms of why this is has not happened before, it is just that we had not learned about it before. This is something that Health Canada was looking into and it is something that was only started last year in the United States. This is something that was identified as a potential area where we could improve breast cancer screening. It is certainly worthy of the House to look into, if it could potentially save lives of 23,000 females who are, unfortunately, diagnosed with breast cancer every year.
Monsieur le Président, nous en savons de plus en plus sur le cancer du sein. Je sais que les États-Unis et d'autres pays ont constaté qu'il était difficile de détecter un cancer du sein chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense, car la densité mammaire élevée fausse les résultats à la mammographie, ce qui n'était pas clair auparavant. Il se pourrait que jusqu'à 40 p. 100 des femmes aient une densité mammaire élevée, ce qui veut dire que les résultats à la mammographie seraient erronés pour une énorme proportion de femmes. Les nouvelles initiatives de dépistage que mettent actuellement en oeuvre d'autres administrations nous donnent une occasion d'apprendre de leurs expériences. En adoptant des pratiques plus efficaces, on franchirait un très grand pas en avant dans la lutte contre le cancer du sein au Canada.
Nous n'avions pas encore agi à cet égard pour la simple et bonne raison que nous ignorions ce que nous savons maintenant. Santé Canada s'est penché sur la question, et les États-Unis commencent à s'y intéresser depuis l'an passé seulement. On croit que les connaissances à cet égard pourraient nous permettre d'améliorer le dépistage du cancer du sein. Si ces connaissances nous permettaient de sauver la vie de 23 000 femmes qui, chaque année, reçoivent malheureusement un diagnostic de cancer du sein, il vaut assurément la peine que la Chambre en débatte.
View Patrick Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Patrick Brown Profile
2011-10-03 15:14 [p.1765]
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-314, An Act respecting the awareness of screening among women with dense breast tissue.
He said: Mr. Speaker, this enactment would require the Government of Canada to encourage the use of existing initiatives in order to increase the awareness of women about the implications of dense breast tissue for breast cancer screening and to assist health care providers in making well-informed decisions regarding screening.
According to the Canadian Cancer Society, in 2011 it is expected that over 23,000 Canadian females will be diagnosed with breast cancer, of which, regrettably, over 5,000 will pass away.
The Government of Canada can certainly play an effective role in the adoption of effective early detection screening practices. Targeting dense tissue is one of the means by which we can make a tangible difference.
demande à présenter le projet de loi C-314, Loi concernant la sensibilisation au dépistage chez les femmes ayant un tissu mammaire dense.
— Monsieur le Président, le texte exige du gouvernement du Canada qu'il encourage le recours aux initiatives existantes afin de sensibiliser davantage les femmes aux conséquences de la densité mammaire dans le dépistage du cancer du sein, ainsi que d'aider les fournisseurs de soins de santé à prendre des décisions éclairées relativement au dépistage.
Selon les prévisions de la Société canadienne du cancer, en 2011, plus de 23 000 Canadiennes recevront un diagnostic de cancer du sein qui, malheureusement, entraînera la mort chez plus 5 000 d'entre elles.
Le gouvernement du Canada peut certes jouer un rôle efficace dans l'adoption de pratiques de dépistage précoce. La sensibilisation à la densité mammaire est l'un des moyens qui nous permettraient d'obtenir des résultats tangibles.
Results: 1 - 11 of 11

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data