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2015-07-22 [p.2890]
— No. 412-5990 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-18;
2015-06-17 [p.2815]
— by Ms. Jones (Labrador), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-6005);
2015-06-17 [p.2821]
Q-1281 — Ms. Bennett (St. Paul's) — With regard to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Aboriginal Affairs: what are the file numbers, dates, and titles of all briefing notes, dockets, dossiers, reports, or other documents of any kind which were used to compile or inform the statistics concerning missing and murdered indigenous women which were referred to, referenced, or cited by the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs during his meeting with First Nation leaders in Calgary, Alberta, on or about Friday, March 20, 2015? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-412-1281.
2015-06-16 [p.2783]
— by Ms. Péclet (La Pointe-de-l'Île), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-5990) and one concerning metric system (No. 412-5991);
2015-06-16 [p.2793]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. Bennett (St. Paul's), seconded by Mr. Easter (Malpeque), — That, in the opinion of the House, the tragic and inequitable issue of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls is of critical importance for all Canadians; that the government has failed to provide justice for the victims, healing for the families, or an end to the violence; and that the House call on the government to take immediate action to deal with this systemic problem and call a public inquiry. (Private Members' Business M-411)
The debate continued.
2015-06-15 [p.2758]
— No. 412-5543 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-17;
2015-06-11 [p.2731]
— No. 412-5769 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-16.
2015-05-27 [p.2578]
— by Mr. Kellway (Beaches—East York), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-5769);
2015-05-13 [p.2525]
— No. 412-5348 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-15.
2015-05-12 [p.2517]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:
— No. 412-5215 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-14;
2015-05-11 [p.2511]
Ms. Bennett (St. Paul's), seconded by Mr. Easter (Malpeque), moved, — That, in the opinion of the House, the tragic and inequitable issue of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls is of critical importance for all Canadians; that the government has failed to provide justice for the victims, healing for the families, or an end to the violence; and that the House call on the government to take immediate action to deal with this systemic problem and call a public inquiry. (Private Members' Business M-411)
Debate arose thereon.
2015-05-08 [p.2506]
— No. 412-5365 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-13.
2015-05-06 [p.2482]
— by Ms. Duncan (Etobicoke North), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-5543);
2015-04-22 [p.2385]
— by Ms. Leslie (Halifax), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-5365);
2015-04-21 [p.2380]
— by Mr. Kellway (Beaches—East York), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-5348);
2015-04-20 [p.2361]
— Nos. 412-5098 and 412-5190 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-12;
2015-03-30 [p.2303]
— by Ms. Duncan (Etobicoke North), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-5215);
2015-03-26 [p.2290]
— by Ms. Duncan (Edmonton—Strathcona), three concerning the grain industry (Nos. 412-5187 to 412-5189) and one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-5190);
2015-03-12 [p.2231]
— by Mr. Hsu (Kingston and the Islands), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-5098);
2015-02-27 [p.2196]
— No. 412-4872 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-11;
2015-01-21 [p.2034]
— Nos. 412-4527 and 412-4534 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-10;
2014-12-10 [p.1951]
— Nos. 412-4459 and 412-4530 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-09;
2014-11-27 [p.1849]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:
— Nos. 412-4312, 412-4313 and 412-4338 concerning health care services. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-7-27;
2014-11-21 [p.1818]
— by Ms. Duncan (Etobicoke North), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-4534);
2014-11-17 [p.1759]
— Nos. 412-4079 and 412-4139 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-08;
2014-11-06 [p.1740]
— by Mr. Lamoureux (Winnipeg North), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-4459);
2014-11-05 [p.1727]
— No. 412-4026 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-07;
2014-10-29 [p.1659]
— No. 412-3919 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-06;
2014-10-29 [p.1663]
Q-651 — Mr. Trudeau (Papineau) — With regard to the Northern Gateway Project: (a) did the government request an assessment or legal opinion from any department or agency as to whether consultations conducted by the Joint Review Panel on the Northern Gateway Project fulfilled the Crown’s duty to consult with Aboriginal peoples, and if so, what were the contents of those assessments, broken down by (i) department or agency, (ii) date; (b) did the government provide oversight for, monitor or evaluate the adequacy or sufficiency of the Joint Review Panel’s Aboriginal consultation efforts throughout the panel process, and if so, what were the findings of said oversight, monitoring and evaluation, broken down by (i) department or agency, (ii) date; (c) which Aboriginal communities or groups did the Joint Review Process engage with during the five phases of consultation described in the "Aboriginal Consultation Framework for the Northern Gateway Pipeline Project" document, broken down by (i) phase, (ii) Aboriginal community or group, (iii) year; (d) how much participant funding was requested by Aboriginal communities or groups throughout the Joint Review Panel Process, broken down by (i) Aboriginal community or group, (ii) year funding was provided; and (e) how much participant funding was provided to Aboriginal communities or groups throughout the Joint Review Panel Process, broken down by (i) Aboriginal community or group, (ii) year funding was provided? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-412-651.
2014-10-27 [p.1651]
Ms. Sims (Newton—North Delta), seconded by Mr. Julian (Burnaby—New Westminster), moved, — That the Fourth Report of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, presented on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, be concurred in. (Concurrence in Committee Reports No. 17)
2014-10-21 [p.1630]
— by Ms. Duncan (Edmonton—Strathcona), one concerning the Canada Post Corporation (No. 412-4336), one concerning genetic engineering (No. 412-4337), one concerning health care services (No. 412-4338) and two concerning the Canada Pension Plan (Nos. 412-4339 and 412-4340);
2014-10-01 [p.1549]
— by Mr. Brown (Barrie), one concerning the grain industry (No. 412-4138) and one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-4139);
2014-09-29 [p.1498]
— by Mr. Lamoureux (Winnipeg North), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-4079);
2014-09-25 [p.1488]
— by Mr. Kenney (Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Multiculturalism) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the Fourth Report of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, "Opportunities for Aboriginal Persons in the Workforce" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-412-86), presented to the House on Wednesday, May 28, 2014. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-412-86.
2014-09-24 [p.1468]
— by Mr. Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-4026) and one concerning health care services (No. 412-4027);
2014-09-24 [p.1471]
Pursuant to Standing Order 66(2), the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou), seconded by Mrs. Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing), — That the First Report of the Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women, presented on Friday, March 7, 2014, be concurred in. (Concurrence in Committee Reports No. 10)
The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:
(Division No. 228 -- Vote no 228) - View vote details.
YEAS: 148, NAYS: 126
2014-09-23 [p.1465]
Pursuant to Standing Order 66(2), the House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou), seconded by Mrs. Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing), — That the First Report of the Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women, presented on Friday, March 7, 2014, be concurred in. (Concurrence in Committee Reports No. 7)
The debate continued.
2014-09-15 [p.1340]
— No. 412-3668 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-05;
2014-09-15 [p.1342]
— by Ms. Duncan (Etobicoke North), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-3919);
2014-09-15 [p.1435]
— by Ms. Leitch (Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the First Report of the Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women, "Invisible Women: A Call to Action — A Report on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Canada" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-412-52), presented to the House on Friday, March 7, 2014. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-412-52.
2014-06-18 [p.1311]
— Nos. 412-2641 and 412-2663 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-04;
2014-06-13 [p.1275]
— by Ms. Duncan (Etobicoke North), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-3668);
2014-05-28 [p.1083]
Mr. Armstrong (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment and Social Development), from the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, presented the Fourth Report of the Committee, "Opportunities for Aboriginal Persons in the Workforce". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-412-86.
Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.
A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 8 to 10 and 13 to 18) was tabled.
2014-05-06 [p.884]
— by Mr. Cotler (Mount Royal), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-2663);
2014-04-28 [p.843]
Q-312 — Mr. Gravelle (Nickel Belt) — With regard to the Ring of Fire mining project in the far north of Ontario: (a) what departments and officials sit on the inter-department secretariat for the project; (b) what are the federal responsibilities for this project; (c) what is the federal funding to date for the project's activities; (d) how many First Nations members are currently or projected to receive training in mining related activity to work on the project, (i) from which communities do individuals currently being trained originate, (ii) in what trades, (iii) which federal programs are being accessed for this training, (iv) what is the forecast of skilled workers who will be required; and (e) what meetings have taken place between any officials of the Government of Canada and the Government of Ontario on this project, (i) what are the names of the participants, (ii) on what dates were the meetings held, (iii) what was included in the agenda for each meeting? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-412-312.
2014-03-31 [p.758]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:
— Nos. 412-1636 and 412-1647 concerning crimes of violence. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-412-63-02;
2014-03-07 [p.654]
Mrs. Ambler (Mississauga South), from the Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women, presented the First Report of the Committee, "Invisible Women: A Call to Action — A Report on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Canada". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-412-52.
Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.
A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 1 to 8) was tabled.
2014-03-07 [p.657]
Q-225 — Mr. Bevington (Western Arctic) — With regard to the study and treatment of eating disorders: (a) how many major eating disorder studies have been funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) including treatment, prevention or epidemiology research; (b) how many CIHR peer review committees include members who have expertise in eating disorders; (c) are questions about eating disorders included in national databases; (d) what Health Canada eating disorder initiatives are in place; (e) what are the reasons for which Health Canada does not include low body mass index (BMI) as a separate category; (f) is the Public Health Agency of Canada tracking eating disorders in terms of prevalence, access to treatment and availability of services; (g) is Statistics Canada tracking eating disorders; (h) what are the rates of eating disorders among First Nations, on reserve and in the territories; (i) what barriers to care for Aboriginal Canadians have been identified; (j) have eating disorders been integrated into obesity prevention initiatives in Aboriginal communities; (k) are these initiatives gender and culturally sensitive; (l) in the case of obesity-related research or healthy weight initiatives conducted by the government, are there safeguards in place to ensure ‘no harm’; (m) has the government conducted any research studies examining the full spectrum of eating disorders, from those affecting people with low BMIs to those affecting people with high BMIs; (n) what research efforts by Canada are underway to address those refractory cases currently being treated in long term care mental health facilities; (o) what actions is the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) taking concerning eating disorders; (p) are eating disorders included in MHCC reports; (q) of the MHCC management (board, executive staff and directors) are there any persons with expertise in eating disorders; (r) has the MHCC developed guidelines for treatment and/or prevention of eating disorders and, if not, why not; (s) have Health Canada or other government agencies performed a review of funded eating disorder services and, if not, why not; (t) have Health Canada or other government agencies tracked co-morbid disorders such as eating disorders coupled with psychiatric illnesses; and (u) have Health Canada or other government agencies tracked eating disorders coupled with medical disorders? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-412-225.
2014-02-13 [p.555]
— by Ms. Bennett (St. Paul's), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-1636);
2014-02-13 [p.555]
— by Ms. Ashton (Churchill), one concerning crimes of violence (No. 412-1647);
2013-12-09 [p.361]
Q-94 — Mr. Larose (Repentigny) — With regard to transfer payments to non-profit organizations (excluding hospitals and universities) and the government’s operational spending (O&M) to manage these transfers: (a) what have been the government’s total expenditures in this area since fiscal year 2006-2007, broken down by fiscal year; (b) what has been the break-down of the government’s expenditures since fiscal year 2006-2007 on internal government operations, on grants, and on contributions, broken down by fiscal year; (c) what has been the breakdown of expenditures by department and agency, broken down by program area, by fiscal year and by nature of expenditure (for example, grants, contributions, O&M); (d) what fiscal changes (for example, legislative changes to the Income Tax Act) have been put into place since 2006-2007 that directly impact the not-for-profit sector and what has been the financial result of each of these changes (for example, amount of costs or savings to the Treasury by fiscal year since the implementation of each change); (e) what cuts to transfer payments were made during each round of the four-year cycle of Strategic Reviews and as a result of the Strategic and Operational Review (also known as Deficit Reduction Action Plan), broken down by (i) department and agency, (ii) program activity, (iii) nature of expenditure (for example, G&C, Capital, O&M); (f) how much has the government spent on the new social finance approach and what are its projected spending plans for the next few years, including a breakdown of this spending on special pilot projects discussed in Employment and Social Development Canada’s 2013-2014 Report on Plans and Priorities—i.e., to test social partnership and social finance approaches in the area of literacy, youth and Aboriginal labour market programming, as well as through the Foreign Credential Recognition Loans Pilot; (g) which not-for-profit organizations and private firms have been chosen to test the new approach and what is the break-down of government expenditures to date and spending plans on each project, broken down by not-for-profit organization and by private firm? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-412-94.
2013-12-02 [p.260]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into Orders for Return:
Q-1 — Mr. Cotler (Mount Royal) — With regard to aboriginal justice, broken down by year from 2006 to the present: (a) how much money was dedicated to the Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS); (b) how much money was devoted to other aboriginal justice programs; (c) with respect to (a) and (b), by program, how much money was spent; (d) by whom were monies in (a) and (b) spent, on what dates, and for what purpose; (e) broken down by province and territory, on what dates were provinces and territories consulted with respect to funding of the AJS for the upcoming year; (f) broken down by province and territory, on what dates were the provinces and territories consulted with respect to other aboriginal justice programs; (g) broken down by province and territory, how much did each request of the government with respect to the AJS; (h) broken down by province and territory, with which First Nations did the government consult with respect to the AJS; (i) with which First Nations groups and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) did the government consult with respect to the AJS; (j) with which other stakeholders did the government consult with respect to the AJS; (k) which stakeholders were informed of budget decisions relative to the AJS, by what means and on what dates; (l) broken down by province and territory, how much did each request of the government with respect to other aboriginal justice programs; (m) broken down by province and territory, with which First Nations did the government consult with respect to other aboriginal justice programs; (n) with which First Nations groups and NGOs did the government consult with respect to other aboriginal justice programs; (o) with which other stakeholders did the government consult with respect to other aboriginal justice programs; (p) how does the government determine stakeholders regarding aboriginal justice concerns; (q) by whom, with what criteria, and when was the AJS budget determined; (r) in what ways, by whom, and when is AJS evaluated; (s) in which Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers' meetings was the AJS raised;
(t) what commitments were made by the government; (u) were those commitments met; (v) which stakeholders were informed of budget decisions relative to other aboriginal justice programs, by what means and on what dates; (w) by whom, with what criteria, and when were these budgets determined; (x) in what ways, by whom, and when are these programs evaluated; (y) in which Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers' meetings were these programs raised; (z) what commitments were made by the government; (aa) were those commitments met; (bb) in what ways do these programs work to implement the Gladue principles; (cc) in what other ways are the Gladue principles being implemented; (dd) by what means, how often, with which criteria, and by whom does the government evaluate its implementation of the Gladue principles; (ee) what programs and strategies are in place to ensure both respect for and compliance with the Gladue principles; (ff) how many Gladue courts operate in Canada; (gg) in what ways is the government engaged with Gladue courts; (hh) in what ways does the government support Gladue courts; (ii) in what ways does the government ensure training for judges on the Gladue principles; (jj) in what ways does the government ensure training for prosecutors on the Gladue principles; (kk) in what ways does the government ensure the consideration of Gladue principles in its filings and submissions before the courts; (ll) in what ways is the government addressing the over-representation of aboriginals in prisons; (mm) what are the principles of the government’s aboriginal justice approach; (nn) how does the government evaluate whether its approach to aboriginal justice is working; (oo) by what specific standards, by whom and how often do such evaluations occur; (pp) in what ways does the government undertake predictions or forecasts with respect to the incarceration of aboriginal offenders; (qq) how are these forecasts taken into account in criminal justice policy development; (rr) in what ways are proposed justice laws evaluated for their impact on aboriginal persons; (ss) in what ways is the government incorporating aboriginal justice into its overall justice strategy; (tt) what policies exist to ensure aboriginal justice concerns are taken into account at every stage of policy and legislative development; (uu) who is responsible for keeping statistics on aboriginal justice; (vv) with respect to (uu), what statistics are available and from which departments; and (ww) with respect to (vv) what are the figures for each of the last three years? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-412-1.
2013-11-07 [p.161]
By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, notwithstanding the Order adopted by the House on Monday, October 21, 2013, the Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women be permitted to report its recommendations no later than Friday, March 7, 2014.
2013-10-17 [p.24]
Mr. Van Loan (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons), seconded by Mr. Ritz (Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food), moved, — That, notwithstanding any Standing Order or usual practice of the House, for the purposes of facilitating and organizing the business of the House and its committees in the autumn of 2013,
(a) during the thirty sitting days following the adoption of this Order, whenever a Minister of the Crown, when proposing a motion for first reading of a public bill, states that the said bill is in the same form as a bill introduced by a Minister of the Crown in the previous Session, or that it is in the same form as a bill which had originated in the Senate and stood in the name of a Minister of the Crown in this House in the previous Session, if the Speaker is satisfied that the said bill is in the same form as at prorogation, notwithstanding Standing Order 71, the said bill shall be deemed in the current Session to have been considered and approved at all stages completed at the time of prorogation of the previous Session;
(b) in order to bring full transparency and accountability to House of Commons spending, the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs be instructed to: (i) conduct open and public hearings with a view to replace the Board of Internal Economy with an independent oversight body, (ii) invite the Auditor General, the Clerk and the Chief Financial Officer of the House of Commons to participate fully in these hearings, (iii) study the practices of provincial and territorial legislatures, as well as other jurisdictions and Westminster-style Parliaments in order to compare and contrast their administrative oversight, (iv) propose modifications to the Parliament of Canada Act, the Financial Administration Act, the Auditor General Act and any other acts as deemed necessary, (v) propose any necessary modifications to the administrative policies and practices of the House of Commons, (vi) examine the subject-matter of the motions, which had stood in the name of the Member for Papineau, placed on the Order Paper for the previous Session on June 10, 2013, and (vii) report its findings to the House no later than Monday, December 2, 2013, in order to have any proposed changes to expense disclosure and reporting in place for the beginning of the next fiscal year;
(c) when the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs meets pursuant to the order of reference set out in paragraph (b) of this Order, one Member who is not a member of a recognized party be allowed to participate in the hearings as a temporary, non-voting member of that Committee;
(d) the Clerk be authorized, if necessary, to convene a meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs within 24 hours of the adoption of this Order;
(e) the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs be instructed to study the Standing Orders and procedures of the House and its committees, including the proceedings on the debate held on Friday, February 17, 2012, pursuant to Standing Order 51;
(f) the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights be the committee designated for the purposes of section 533.1 of the Criminal Code;
(g) the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics be the committee designated for the purposes of section 67 of the Conflict of Interest Act;
(h) the order of reference to the Standing Committee on Finance, adopted in the previous Session as Private Member’s Motion M-315, shall be renewed, provided that the Committee shall report its findings to the House no later than Wednesday, December 11, 2013;
(i) a special committee be appointed, with the mandate to conduct hearings on the critical matter of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada, and to propose solutions to address the root causes of violence against Indigenous women across the country, and that, with respect to the committee, (i) it consist of twelve members which shall include seven members from the government party, four members from the Official Opposition and one member from the Liberal Party, (ii) the Chair and the Vice-Chairs shall be the same Chair and Vice-Chairs elected by the previous Session’s Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women, (iii) the routine motions respecting committee business adopted on March 26 and April 18, 2013, by the previous Session’s Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women shall be deemed adopted, provided that it may, by motion, vary or rescind their provisions at a later date, (iv) it have all of the powers of a Standing Committee as provided in the Standing Orders, as well as the power to travel, accompanied by the necessary staff, inside and outside of Canada, subject to the usual authorization from the House, (v) the members serving on the said committee be appointed by the Whip of each party depositing with the Clerk of the House a list of his or her party’s members of the committee within ten sitting days of the adoption of this Order, (vi) the quorum be seven members for any proceedings, provided that at least a member of the opposition and of the government party be present, (vii) membership substitutions be permitted to be made from time to time, if required, in the manner provided for in Standing Order 114(2), and (viii) it report its recommendations to the House no later than February 14, 2014;
(j) with respect to any order of reference created as a consequence of this Order, any evidence adduced by a committee in the previous Session shall be deemed to have been laid upon the Table in the present Session and referred to the appropriate committee;
(k) the reference to “September 30” in Standing Order 28(2)(b) shall be deemed, for the calendar year 2013, to read “November 8”;
(l) the reference to “the tenth sitting day before the last normal sitting day in December” in Standing Order 83.1 shall be deemed, for the calendar year 2013, to read “Wednesday, December 11, 2013”; and
(m) on Thursday, October 31, 2013, the hours of sitting and order of business of the House shall be that of a Friday, provided that (i) the time for filing of any notice be no later than 6:00 p.m., (ii) when the House adjourns it shall stand adjourned until Monday, November 4, 2013, and (iii) any recorded division in respect of a debatable motion requested on, or deferred to, October 31, 2013, shall be deemed to be deferred or further deferred, as the case may be, to the ordinary hour of daily adjournment on November 4, 2013. (Government Business No. 2)
Debate arose thereon.
2013-04-23 [p.3018]
Pursuant to Order made Friday, April 19, 2013, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Ms. Crowder (Nanaimo—Cowichan), seconded by Mr. Genest-Jourdain (Manicouagan), — That this House call on the government to: (a) abandon its confrontational approach to First Nations, Métis and Inuit in favour of a nation-to-nation dialogue; (b) make treaty implementation, as well as the settlement and implementation of land claims, a priority, including in Labrador; and (c) begin negotiations in good faith with NunatuKavut Community Council on their comprehensive land claim that has been without a response since 1991.
The question was put on the motion and it was negatived on the following division:
(Division No. 665 -- Vote no 665) - View vote details.
YEAS: 123, NAYS: 146
2013-04-19 [p.3001]
The Order was read for the consideration of the Business of Supply.
Ms. Crowder (Nanaimo—Cowichan), seconded by Mr. Genest-Jourdain (Manicouagan), moved, — That this House call on the government to: (a) abandon its confrontational approach to First Nations, Métis and Inuit in favour of a nation-to-nation dialogue; (b) make treaty implementation, as well as the settlement and implementation of land claims, a priority, including in Labrador; and (c) begin negotiations in good faith with NunatuKavut Community Council on their comprehensive land claim that has been without a response since 1991.
Debate arose thereon.
2013-04-19 [p.3002]
By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, at the conclusion of today's debate on the opposition motion in the name of the Member for Nanaimo-Cowichan, all questions necessary to dispose of the motion be deemed put and a recorded division deemed requested and deferred to Tuesday, April 23, 2013, at the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders; and that the House then proceed to the consideration of Private Members' Business.
2013-04-19 [p.3003]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. Crowder (Nanaimo—Cowichan), seconded by Mr. Genest-Jourdain (Manicouagan), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2013-04-19 [p.3003]
At 1:15 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 81(16), the Speaker interrupted the proceedings.
2013-04-19 [p.3003]
Pursuant to Order made earlier today, the question was deemed put on the motion and a recorded division was deemed requested and deferred until Tuesday, April 23, 2013, at the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders.
2013-04-16 [p.2975]
— No. 411-3417 concerning aboriginal affairs. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-411-33-08.
2013-04-15 [p.2969]
Q-1189 — Ms. Bennett (St. Paul's) — With regard to the Government of Canada Aboriginal Portal: (a) what was the cost of running and maintaining this portal each year, from 2006 to 2012; (b) how many people used the Portal each year between 2006 and 2012, broken down by sub-sites accessed through the Portal; (c) what services provided by, or facilitated by, the Portal are no longer available to the public since the Portal closed on February 12, 2013; and (d) what studies did the government undertake on the impact of closing the Portal and (i) what were the findings of these studies, (ii) what stakeholders were consulted by the government regarding closing the Portal, (iii) what were the comments and feedback provided by these stakeholders? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-411-1189.
2013-03-18 [p.2861]
— No. 411-3137 concerning budget measures. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-411-103-05;
2013-03-07 [p.2835]
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Ms. Bergen (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety) laid upon the Table, — Document entitled "Spirit Matters: Aboriginal People and the Corrections and Conditional Release Act". — Sessional Paper No. 8525-411-53.
2013-02-26 [p.2786]
At 5:19 p.m., by unanimous consent and pursuant to Order made Thursday, February 14, 2013, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Ms. Bennett (St. Paul's), seconded by Mr. Valeriote (Guelph), — That the House recognize that a disproportionate number of Indigenous women and girls have suffered violence, gone missing, or been murdered over the past three decades; and that the government has a responsibility to provide justice for the victims, healing for the families, and to work with partners to put an end to the violence; and that a special committee be appointed, with the mandate to conduct hearings on the critical matter of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada, and to propose solutions to address the root causes of violence against Indigenous women across the country; that the committee consist of twelve members which shall include seven members from the government party, four members from the Official Opposition and one member from the Liberal Party, provided that the Chair is from the government party; that in addition to the Chair, there be one Vice-Chair from each of the opposition parties; that the committee have all of the powers of a Standing Committee as provided in the Standing Orders, as well as the power to travel, accompanied by the necessary staff, inside and outside of Canada, subject to the usual authorization from the House; that the members to serve on the said committee be appointed by the Whip of each party depositing with the Clerk of the House a list of his or her party’s members of the committee no later than March 28, 2013; that the quorum of the special committee be seven members for any proceedings, provided that at least a member of the opposition and of the government party be present; that membership substitutions be permitted to be made from time to time, if required, in the manner provided for in Standing Order 114(2); and that the committee report its recommendations to the House no later than February 14, 2014.
The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:
(Division No. 617 -- Vote no 617) - View vote details.
YEAS: 278, NAYS: 0
2013-02-14 [p.2768]
The Order was read for the consideration of the Business of Supply.
Ms. Bennett (St. Paul's), seconded by Mr. Valeriote (Guelph), moved, — That the House recognize that a disproportionate number of Indigenous women and girls have suffered violence, gone missing, or been murdered over the past three decades; and that the government has a responsibility to provide justice for the victims, healing for the families, and to work with partners to put an end to the violence; and that a special committee be appointed, with the mandate to conduct hearings on the critical matter of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada, and to propose solutions to address the root causes of violence against Indigenous women across the country; that the committee consist of twelve members which shall include seven members from the government party, four members from the Official Opposition and one member from the Liberal Party, provided that the Chair is from the government party; that in addition to the Chair, there be one Vice-Chair from each of the opposition parties; that the committee have all of the powers of a Standing Committee as provided in the Standing Orders, as well as the power to travel, accompanied by the necessary staff, inside and outside of Canada, subject to the usual authorization from the House; that the members to serve on the said committee be appointed by the Whip of each party depositing with the Clerk of the House a list of his or her party’s members of the committee no later than March 28, 2013; that the quorum of the special committee be seven members for any proceedings, provided that at least a member of the opposition and of the government party be present; that membership substitutions be permitted to be made from time to time, if required, in the manner provided for in Standing Order 114(2); and that the committee report its recommendations to the House no later than February 14, 2014.
Debate arose thereon.
2013-02-14 [p.2768]
By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, at the conclusion of today's debate on the opposition motion in the name of the Member for St. Paul's, all questions necessary to dispose of the motion be deemed put and a recorded division deemed requested and deferred to Tuesday, February 26, 2013, at the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders.
2013-02-14 [p.2768]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. Bennett (St. Paul's), seconded by Mr. Valeriote (Guelph), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2013-02-14 [p.2769]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. Bennett (St. Paul's), seconded by Mr. Valeriote (Guelph), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2013-02-14 [p.2769]
At 5:15 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 81(16), the Speaker interrupted the proceedings.
2013-02-14 [p.2769]
Pursuant to Order made earlier today, the question was deemed put on the motion and the recorded division was deemed requested and deferred until Tuesday, February 26, 2013, at the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders.
2013-02-13 [p.2762]
— by Mr. Goodale (Wascana), one concerning budget measures (No. 411-3137) and one concerning health care services (No. 411-3138);
2013-01-31 [p.2719]
By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, at the conclusion of today's debate on the opposition motion in the name of the Member for Nanaimo—Cowichan, all questions necessary to dispose of the motion be deemed put and a recorded division deemed requested and deferred to Tuesday, February 5, 2013, at the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders.
2013-01-28 [p.2643]
— Nos. 411-2494, 411-2637 to 411-2639 and 411-2763 concerning budget measures. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-411-103-04;
2013-01-28 [p.2651]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the supplementary return to the following question made into an Order for Return:
Q-939 — Mr. Genest-Jourdain (Manicouagan) — With regard to funding for First Nations, Inuit and Métis, for each department and program in the last five years, how much was spent on: (a) operating costs, broken down by (i) salaries and benefits for government employees, (ii) salaries and fees for consultants hired by the government, (iii) other enumerated costs; and (b) transfers to First Nations, Inuit and Métis, broken down by (i) payments made to First Nations, Inuit and Métis organizations, (ii) payments made to First Nations bands on-reserve, (iii) other enumerated transfer payments? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-411-939-01.
2012-11-30 [p.2397]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into Orders for Return:
Q-980 — Ms. Boivin (Gatineau) — With regard to Bill C-10, An Act to enact the Justice for Victims of Terrorism Act and to amend the State Immunity Act, the Criminal Code, the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Corrections and Conditional Release Act, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and other Acts: (a) what has the Department of Justice identified as the policy objectives or desired outcomes of Bill C-10 and what indicator has been identified to measure progress; (b) what has the Department identified as the overall legal costs for defending Bill C-10 from legal challenges; (c) when assessing the compliance of Bill C-10 with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms under section 4 of the Department of Justice Act, what measures were used to assess whether delays in trial processes and prison overcrowding would violate Charter-guaranteed rights; (d) what is the measure of post-sentence recidivism rates used now by the Department of Public Safety, and how is the success of Bill C-10 to be defined and measured; (e) what are the numbers of Aboriginal, women, addicted, cognitively-impaired or mentally-ill offenders in remand or federal custody facilities that are being used as a base against which to assess whether Bill C-10 increases or decreases those numbers; and (f) how is the government assessing benefits to victims of crime resulting from Bill C-10? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-411-980.
2012-11-19 [p.2300]
Q-925 — Mrs. Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing) — With regard to all cuts to government spending announced since Budget 2012: (a) how will announced service cuts affect Aboriginal organizations, First Nations, Inuit, Métis, non-status Indians or people living off-reserve; (b) how will announced program or core funding cuts affect Aboriginal organizations, First Nations, Inuit, Métis, non-status Indians or people living off-reserve; (c) how will announced staff cuts affect Aboriginal organizations, First Nations, Inuit, Métis, non-status Indians or people living off-reserve; (d) what consultations took place before the cuts were announced with groups representing Aboriginal organizations, First Nations, Inuit, Métis, non-status Indians or people living off-reserve; and (e) what analysis has been done on the possible effects of service, program and staff cuts to Aboriginal organizations, First Nations, Inuit, Métis, non-status Indians or people living off-reserve? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-411-925.
2012-11-19 [p.2301]
Q-932 — Mr. Genest-Jourdain (Manicouagan) — With regard to the Aboriginal Women’s Program under Canadian Heritage: (a) for each year from 2004 to 2012, which organizations received funding, and how much did they receive annually; (b) what are the criteria for receiving funding; (c) what changes have been made to the criteria for receiving funding in the past six years; (d) what kinds of consultations were held before the changes were implemented, including (i) a list of those consulted, (ii) dates and formats of consultations; and (e) what kind of accommodations were made based on those consultations? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-411-932.
2012-11-19 [p.2302]
Q-939 — Mr. Genest-Jourdain (Manicouagan) — With regard to funding for First Nations, Inuit and Métis, for each department and program in the last five years, how much was spent on: (a) operating costs, broken down by (i) salaries and benefits for government employees, (ii) salaries and fees for consultants hired by the government, (iii) other enumerated costs; and (b) transfers to First Nations, Inuit and Métis, broken down by (i) payments made to First Nations, Inuit and Métis organizations, (ii) payments made to First Nations bands on-reserve, (iii) other enumerated transfer payments? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-411-939.
2012-10-30 [p.2223]
Q-859 — Ms. Crowder (Nanaimo—Cowichan) — With regard to the Budget 2010 announcement of $25 million over five years to address the high incidence of missing and murdered Aboriginal women: (a) how much of that funding has been allocated; (b) to which organizations or entities was the funding allocated; (c) what supports for victims have been provided by this funding; (d) what improvements to the justice system, to respond directly to cases of missing and murdered Aboriginal women, have been announced or implemented; (e) what quantitative analysis has been done on the effectiveness of this funding on reducing the high incidence of missing and murdered Aboriginal women; (f) how many groups applied for funding; (g) how many groups were denied funding; and (h) what was the rationale for denying funding to those groups? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-411-859.
2012-09-17 [p.1929]
Q-719 — Mr. Hsu (Kingston and the Islands) — With regard to the representation of First Nation, Métis, Inuit or Aboriginal Canadians employed by Correctional Service Canada (CSC): (a) broken down by province and territory and by calendar year from 1990 until 2012, (i) what was the number of CSC employees, (ii) how many of CSC’s employees were First Nation, Métis, Inuit or Aboriginal Canadians, (iii) what percentage of CSC employees were First Nation, Métis, Inuit or Aboriginal Canadians; and (b) broken down by province and territory and by calendar year from 1990 until 2012, (i) what was the number of management-level CSC employees, (ii) how many management-level CSC employees were First Nation, Métis, Inuit or Aboriginal Canadians, (iii) what percentage of management-level CSC employees were First Nation, Métis, Inuit or Aboriginal Canadians? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-411-719.
2012-07-18 [p.1975]
— No. 411-1244 concerning aboriginal affairs. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-411-33-05;
2012-06-15 [p.1834]
— No. 411-1051 concerning aboriginal affairs. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-411-33-04;
2012-06-04 [p.1373]
— by Mr. Valeriote (Guelph), one concerning aboriginal affairs (No. 411-1244);
2012-04-23 [p.3]
— Nos. 411-0547 and 411-0568 concerning aboriginal affairs. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-411-33-03;
2012-04-23 [p.14]
Q-504 — Ms. Bennett (St. Paul's) — With regard to Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Health Canada, breaking down each response by First Nations or Inuit community: (a) what was the number of registered First Nations or Inuit clients with a prescription for OxyContin under the Non-Insured Health Benefit (NIHB) Program in each of the years from 2006 to 2012 inclusive; (b) how many requests for Suboxone treatment were received by NIHB after it was listed on December 7, 2011, and, of these (i) how many were granted, (ii) what was the reason given for requests that were refused, (iii) was an alternative treatment offered to those clients whose requests were refused, (iv) what measures were taken to measure the health outcomes of clients whose requests were refused; (c) is there a doctor, nurse or other health professional trained in drug treatment in the community; (d) is there a healing centre in the community, and, if not, what is the location of the closest or most-readily accessible healing centre; (e) what sort of culturally-appropriate psychosocial aftercare services are available in the community for clients who have completed a detoxification program; (f) did the government conduct evaluations of the level of substance abuse during the period 2006 to 2012, and, if so, (i) how has the rate changed over time, (ii) what is the extent of abuse of legally-obtained prescription drugs, (iii) what is the extent of abuse of illegally-obtained prescription drugs; (g) what was the amount of funding for drug prevention and drug treatment in each of the years from 2006 to 2012 inclusive, and what was the amount of funding dedicated specifically to prescription drug abuse, obtained both legally and illegally; and (h) what was the amount of funding for the National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program in each of the years from 2006 to 2012 inclusive, and what was the amount spent on (i) prevention activities, (ii) intervention activities, (iii) aftercare activities? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-411-504.
2012-03-01 [p.884]
— by Mrs. Glover (Saint Boniface), one concerning nuclear weapons (No. 411-0567), one concerning aboriginal affairs (No. 411-0568) and one concerning poverty (No. 411-0569).
2012-02-29 [p.870]
— by Mr. Bevington (Western Arctic), one concerning aboriginal affairs (No. 411-0547) and one concerning housing policy (No. 411-0548);
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