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Results: 1 - 15 of 505
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-18 14:24 [p.15291]
Mr. Speaker, after 10 years of grinding mediocrity under the Conservative government, Canadians are saddled with $157 billion in new Conservative debt; $4,400 in new debt for every man, woman and child in the country. The Conservatives have increased the net tax burden in five of its last six budgets; they have reported 53 monthly trade deficits, including the worst in Canadian history; and they have the worst economic growth record in eight decades.
If that is the best the Conservatives can do, why do they not just get out of the way?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-18 14:25 [p.15291]
Mr. Speaker, there are 200,000 more unemployed Canadians than before the recession. The numbers from the government are not getting any better. Even worse, the economy actually shrank through the first quarter of this year.
Growth for all of 2015 is projected at 1.5%. That is no better than Europe. At least 24 major economies are set to grow faster this year than will Canada's. That is the hard reality of 10 years under that broken government.
Why is its promise to Canadians just more of the same: more brokenness, more failure?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-18 15:08 [p.15299]
Mr. Speaker, if the sensibilities across the way have been offended, I am happy to apologize. That still does not sanction the quality of the question.
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-16 14:24 [p.15154]
Mr. Speaker, according to court documents, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness pressured the RCMP to destroy documents, documents within the jurisdiction of the Information Commissioner.
The minister knew it was illegal, as did the RCMP, and all the while they said the documents were safe, but that was a lie. Some officers even joked that the PMO would owe them a lot of drinks for helping them break the law.
Counselling illegal behaviour and cover-up; is this not reason enough to give the Information Commissioner the binding authority to order disclosure?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-16 14:25 [p.15154]
Mr. Speaker, he just keeps making it up.
The will of Parliament is not the illegal destruction of documents. The will of Parliament is not the obstruction of justice. The will of Parliament is not lying to the Information Commissioner.
If Canadians are going to trust their government, their government needs to trust them, trust them with access to information, trust them with the facts, trust them with the truth.
Why does the government believe that it cannot accomplish its policy objectives without breaking the law? That is an attitude of a tin pot republic, not Canada.
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-15 14:24 [p.15062]
Mr. Speaker, the Information Commissioner has taken the government to court over its illegal destruction of records. These records were and still are the subject of a live, unresolved access to information request.
Documents filed in court make three points. First, the destruction of these documents was indeed illegal. Second, both the RCMP and the public safety minister were fully aware of that illegality. Third, the minister's office pressured the RCMP to break the law and cover it up.
Who in the minister's office counselled that illegal behaviour?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-15 14:25 [p.15062]
Mr. Speaker, the government cannot slough this off. It is being investigated now by the OPP.
If the government thinks it can whitewash this illegality with some retroactive exemption buried in the budget bill, it needs to think again. A new government in October could just as easily withdraw that phony absolution, especially for those who pressured the RCMP into illegal conduct and then lied about it.
Who concocted the plan to destroy the data illegally while deceitfully telling the Information Commissioner that it was preserved?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-11 14:26 [p.14963]
Mr. Speaker, the average Canadian boomer now near retirement is more than $400,000 short of what they need to take care of themselves. Canada has a retirement income crisis.
The Canadian Association of Retired Persons says that the voluntary approach has not worked. Sixty percent of Canadians want the Canada pension plan to be expanded, like Jim Flaherty recommended. Fragmented, optional schemes, mostly designed for tax planning, simply do not get the job done.
Why does the Conservative government keep insisting on failure?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-11 14:27 [p.14964]
Mr. Speaker, it is unseemly for members of the government to accuse their own finance minister of not telling the truth. The finance minster has been clear: CPP premiums are not payroll taxes; they are investments in long-term individual security. They do not belong to the government; they always belong to the pensioner, and the CPP Investment Board is getting impressive results. That is what the minister said.
At least 60% of Canadians want to build on that success. The provinces want to do the same thing. Jim Flaherty said it is the right thing to do, so why not?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-10 14:48 [p.14873]
Mr. Speaker, the late Jim Flaherty said “the Canada Pension Plan plays a central role in our government-supported retirement system”, and should be “enhanced”.
The current Minister of Finance has confirmed that CPP premiums are not payroll taxes. He says that the money always belongs to individual pensioners, and the CPP Investment Board gets impressive results.
Fragmented schemes in bits and pieces here and there do not cover most Canadians and they are not portable. Therefore, why not work with the provinces and a strong majority of Canadians to expand the CPP?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-09 14:24 [p.14809]
Mr. Speaker, just repeating a falsehood does not make it true.
Most Canadians are seriously troubled about not having enough to live on in their retirement. Some three-quarters in the private sector do not have a company pension. Typical 35-year-olds today are saving only half of what their parents did. Among those in their 50s, two-thirds have less than $100,000 set aside and one-third has nothing at all.
Canadians want a comprehensive solution. Will the government take the advice of the late Jim Flaherty and begin a modest, phased in, fully funded expansion of the Canada pension plan?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-09 14:26 [p.14809]
Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Finance himself confirmed last week that CPP premiums are not payroll taxes. They do not belong to the government, he said. They always belong to the individual pensioner, he said. The CPP Investment Board gets impressive results, he said.
The finance minister must agree with the late Jim Flaherty, who reported:
...strong support for the Canada Pension Plan and the central role that it plays in our government-supported retirement income system.
Why not work with the provinces on a strong, comprehensive CPP?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-08 15:12 [p.14703]
Mr. Speaker, I have the honour today to present a petition signed by a number of people across Saskatchewan, particularly in the western and northwestern part of the province, addressing the inherent rights of farmers. They are calling for Parliament to enshrine in legislation the inalienable rights of farmers and other Canadians to save, reuse, select, and exchange and sell seeds.
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-03 14:31 [p.14528]
Mr. Speaker, the chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Justice Sinclair, says the abhorrent system of residential schools was an exercise in cultural genocide. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada agrees, as do previous prime ministers, and Canadians more generally.
However, judging by comments made by Judge Sinclair yesterday, after his meeting with the Prime Minister, the government is not yet on the same page.
Would the government explicitly acknowledge the cultural genocide that has taken place and will it agree with the TRC's recommendations?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2015-06-03 14:46 [p.14531]
Mr. Speaker, the finance minister's latest economic forecasts, less than two months ago, are already wrong.
The country has just recorded the worst two months ever for trade deficits. The OECD has slashed Canadian growth prospects for 2015, now down to a meagre 1.5%, meaning three-quarters of OECD countries are doing better than Canada and the current government is likely already back in deficit once again.
Before this House adjourns in three weeks, will the government table a new fiscal update to tell the truth about its deficit and its no-growth economy?
Results: 1 - 15 of 505 | Page: 1 of 34

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