Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 16 of 16
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:25
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Good morning, Gord. It's Ryan here.
First, thank you very much for getting up so early to join us. I know what the time zones are like. Everybody on the west coast who appears before this committee has to get up early, but as they say, “The early bird gets the worm.” Hopefully we've set your path right for the day, so when you're out of here you can go fishing.
Would it surprise you to know that in 2010 there was a report from Environment Yukon, “Status of Yukon Fisheries 2010: An overview of the state of Yukon fisheries and the health of fish stocks, with special reference to fisheries management programs”, which puts the recreational fisheries industry in the Yukon at a $23 million a year benefit and contributor to Yukon's tourism?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:26
I imagine it would be up now because I think there's been some growth in the fisheries between 2010 and 2014.
You say, and I agree with you, that we need to do a bit more to maximize that recreational fisheries opportunity.
Do you have any ideas or suggestions where the federal government in particular could play a role in exposing the value of recreational fisheries, not just in Canada but particularly in the Yukon, to see a bit of that $23 million economic boost actually grow?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:28
More national engagement in recreational fishing opportunities, trying to get Canadians more engaged....
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:28
I appreciate that.
We went through the budgets not too long ago, and the federal government has a role to play in supporting the Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee. I know we've increased the financial resources to them.
We don't enjoy a tremendous recreational fishery opportunity because of the state of Yukon River salmon right now. That's obviously a particular concern to all Yukoners. Would you share with the committee the role that the Yukon Fish and Game Association plays in terms of its stocking program, both from a numbers point of view—how many salmon you release in Wolf Creek and other tributaries—and what the Yukon Fish and Game Association does in terms of engaging Yukon people and youth in that release program, to the benefit of Yukon River salmon?
Are there any other challenges or issues you might want to highlight that would be good for the committee to know about our Yukon River salmon, and recreational fishing opportunities for them?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:31
You mentioned a little bit earlier, in your opening remarks, non-native species. I know we don't allow live bait fishing in the Yukon. Is there a concern right now about aquatic invasive species? There's been some growth of that with changes in weather and the distribution of people. Is the Yukon facing any particular challenge of aquatic invasive species coming in?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:32
Fair enough.
The Yukon Fish and Game Association has representation on the hunter-angler advisory panel. Just generally speaking, how's the participation been on that panel, and how is its efficacy so far?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:33
Super.
Do you know how many members you have currently at the Yukon Fish and Game Association?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:33
Wow. Again, percentage-wise, there are 37,000 people in the territory, as you mentioned, so 900 members is an excellent proportional representation of the Yukon's population. In terms of angling licences sold, those are pretty impressive numbers.
The money from fishing licences sold in the Yukon goes into general revenue and not into particular fisheries conservation, is that right?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:34
You mentioned that you don't know the particular budget of the Yukon government with respect to dedicated resources for fishing and recreational fisheries. That would all be administered by which department?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:34
Okay, and you have a fairly close relationship at the fish and game association with the technicians, directors, and conservation officers as well.
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:35
Thanks for that.
You and I have talked in the past about the recreational fisheries conservation partnerships program and just the challenges in stacking the provincial dollars, federal dollars, and other program dollars. There's been a recent change to it that allows for the stacking of those funds. I'm just wondering if you've been able to take advantage of that program at all at this point.
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-16 11:36
Thank you for your time this morning, Gord.
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2013-04-30 9:32
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to both of you.
Deputy Commissioner Lang, you mentioned that you were just in the Yukon, which is the riding I represent. I was wondering if you would have had an opportunity to see some of the work that's being done in response to the “Sharing Common Ground” report, the review of Yukon's police force which Mr. Scarpaleggia talked a little about, throwing financial resources toward policing. We are talking about the cost of policing, but one of the costs of policing is intrinsically tied to the cost of crime. I think of the Yukon as a great model right now, albeit the review of the police force wasn't done as an economics of policing exercise. It was done out of some high profile cases that came about. When I look at what they're accomplishing, I can't help but think that some of the things they're doing right now are going to achieve some substantial savings on the cost of crime end.
The Northern Institute of Social Justice is doing a career orientation program to recruit women and first nations into policing. There's the establishment of the Yukon Police Council. The arrest processing unit now is being taken over by the Yukon government, so a different level of care is being provided to offenders. The RCMP aren't having to deal with cell block services in the community of Whitehorse. They've come up with a specialized unit for a coordinated response for domestic violence and sexual assault.
Communities are now involved in the selection of commanding officers who are coming to the communities. I think four of the communities in the Yukon have undertaken that already. They have community priorities now being established in their annual performance plans because some communities were doing well with that and others weren't, but they are now finding some success in identifying community priorities. They have a communications director to develop communications strategies to enhance citizen engagement, which will ultimately help reduce crime in the communities. They have a commanding officer's first nation advisory committee, which is working well with different groups, women's organizations and first nations organizations.
I was wondering if you had an opportunity to see that in the works. Maybe you could comment on how you see that working in the Yukon and how you see that potentially being rolled out in the rest of Canada, if it's a positive model.
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2012-10-29 15:51
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to all of the witnesses for attending.
Good day to Mr. Ullyett and Mr. Ford in Whitehorse.
Mr. Ullyett, I have in front of me the executive summary for the “Sharing Common Ground” report you referred to in your opening statements. I'll read a quick sentence here, to put some things into context.
Part of the first page in the executive summary says:We have heard many accounts of policing excellence, including stories of RCMP members going above and beyond their normal duties. The purpose of the Review is to improve the quality of policing services for all citizens in the territory.
A bit further on, they recommend the establishment of Yukon Police Council, with a mandate to ensure that community needs and values are reflected in territorial policing policies and practices....
Then they recommend a makeup of that kind of council. Is there any appetite or effort right now in Yukon to have a separate police council, or is the government currently satisfied with using the current processes?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2011-10-06 16:29
Thank you, senior team members, for coming. It's nice to have you here. I'll bring you out of Atlantic Canada for a little bit and take you way up north. I'd just like to get your views on the Yukon chinook salmon fishery.
I had an opportunity to meet with first nations stakeholders in the Yukon this summer. There is some serious concern there, with some calling on the Department of Fisheries and Oceans to produce a cumulative impact assessment report in conjunction with the United States. I'm just wondering if you're aware of that or if you can share any information with the committee with respect to what might be going on with the chinook salmon in the Yukon.
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2011-10-06 16:31
This is more just a bit of messaging, I guess, but beyond just being a significant food source for them, the chinook salmon are a critical cultural element to the Yukon first nations. They are a method for them to share stories and teach and to have essential family time, including protecting their language. As well, the Yukon River salmon enhance the environment and feed other species like grizzly and wolf, which are a significant species in a wild and healthy Yukon.
I'm just wondering if it is your understanding that efforts to enhance Yukon River salmon actually end up enhancing a large number of other aspects of the Yukon River region.
Results: 1 - 16 of 16

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data