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Results: 1 - 9 of 9
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-06-04 12:56
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to all of our witnesses today.
Part of the purpose of our study is to expose some of the things that I think all of you gentlemen have clearly articulated today, which is a clear understanding on the part of the fishing community, outfitters, and organizations like yours that not only have the knowledge about what's going on in the fisheries ecosystems, but also invest your time and your financial resources, your volunteerism, and technical expertise into vibrant and healthy fish stocks.
On that point, thank you and congratulations. I hope there is some measure of success for all of us in undertaking this study, us, and that Canadians more generally will understand and appreciate the value of your organizations.
My first question will be for Mr. Lévesque and Mr. Bouchard. You noted, and if I've written this correctly, the damage of pleasure crafts to the river mouth and the reduction of currents leading to an increase in cyanobacteria in the area and, as you just mentioned, some of the migration of yellow perch. You also spoke a fair bit about the cormorant populations and a cull in that respect.
I see some overlap here between provincial responsibilities and federal support. I'm wondering if you can talk most specifically about some solutions around how to deal with the pleasure craft issue and the other things that lead to an increase in cyanobacteria. In other words, what solutions would you propose that would fall under the federal mandate to assist with improving the water pollution conditions in Lac Saint-Louis or Lac Saint-Pierre?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-03-25 16:44
Thank you for that.
As Ms. Ross indicated from the Vancouver conference we were both at, because we don't know the numbers, I suspect we're probably projecting them to be a bit higher than we anticipate .
The ultimate issue, then, is going to be—and I guess I'm posing it broadly to everybody here, if you could touch on a complex question quickly—that we have to seize ourselves with the role that Canada plays. That's why we're all here. Of course, there are provincial responsibilities, provincial jurisdictions. Some of those really do deal with the earliest onset issues—prevention, health, education—and, of course, “Jacob's Story” talked about our having all of our children captured in one location in the education institution, but those are provincial and territorial responsibilities.
What do you advise this committee recommend to the federal government as the role it can play respecting some of the complexities and jurisdictional issues around those social support networks, education, and health fronts that do belong in the provinces' hands? How can Canada lead that discussion, or at least what recommendations can you make so that we can step forward on this file so we don't lose the ground we've gained here?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-03-24 16:30
Ms. Block talked a little bit about some of the potential pipelines. When we're crossing provincial jurisdictions, there's going to be some harmonization, obviously, with provincial regimes that this takes into account.
How complex is that at this point to achieve? Obviously, it's self-evident, but how important is it that we standardize those regimes with pipelines that are moving across provincial jurisdictions?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-03-24 17:15
I think you've effectively covered some of what we saw as either outstanding concerns, or questions which on the face were a bit ambiguous, so thank you for providing a lot of clarity around some of those pieces.
I did ask about the complexity around the provincial regulatory regimes and merging with the federal bit. Maybe that would invite whatever comments you're able to make in terms of the relationship around not just provincial governments but municipal and first nation relationships. What steps have been taken to engage aboriginal communities on pipeline safety and this act in particular?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2015-01-29 16:24
It will; it's bound to be.
The chair gave it away. I am the member of Parliament for Yukon. I'm looking at the map here, and there are lots of triangles and blue dots and red dots, none of which exist in the territories. Nunavut I think I understand, but in Yukon, of course, about 57% of the territory is covered with boreal forest. That represents about 281,000 square kilometres of forested land, with white spruce and lodgepole pine. That tends to create a pretty close-knit, hard-grained timber, and that's good, but obviously there's not a lot of stock up there. Market access is a bit of a challenge.
We went through an experience of devolution 10-plus years ago now. The federal government had forest management control at that time. The Northwest Territories has just gone through that. Nunavut's outstanding, although there's not much in the way of forest there. In terms of the two territories, is there a federal forestry approach? Is there anything left outstanding in the Northwest Territories in terms of devolving forestry control, or is that done? Is there a specific look at territorially based involvement of the federal government from a territory forestry strategy?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2013-04-30 17:07
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Thank you, everybody.
We've heard a bit of discussion around product diversification versus market diversification. I represent the Yukon and we have some smaller demonstration projects going on with geothermal, wind, and hydroelectric energy. We have LNG projects that are being explored right now. It raises a question that I have, and maybe I'll just run through the panel here and you can give me your thoughts on it.
Are we in a position where we can make the decision? It may not be this simple, but do we diversify the market first and then try to expose the people we create relationships with in diversified markets to the other technologies or products that we have? Or is there a suggestion that we would diversify our product first and then highlight the wonderful benefits of a broad range of products and then go shopping for a market? The reason I ask that is we've heard a bit of testimony in the past that there is a bit of a race going on in the energy market now, and the first one to complete projects will settle on those long-term contracts and that we run a risk of losing out there. You can probably see what I'm driving at. If we spend a lot of time trying to diversity a whole bunch of things that can be labour-intensive and very costly with infrastructure—and here we've heard a bit about the human capacity challenges involved—are we going to lose that opportunity and lose our markets while we're trying to develop that? Are we better just to solidify the market we now have and then try to grow a relationship of other products? Perhaps you could comment on that and add to it as you see fit.
We'll start with Mr. Willis and work our way down the line.
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2012-12-05 16:56
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thanks to all our witnesses. It's good to see most of you back again.
Commissioner Paulson, we've let you remain rather quiet today. I'll field my questions towards you.
We were all obviously very happy to see the contract jurisdictions signing their policing contracts. Maybe I'll just get you to comment on how important contract policing is across Canada and what investments we've made in contract policing programs.
On the heels of that, maybe you could touch on which provinces and territories have renewed their contract policing agreements with the RCMP. Also, what are the main changes in these contract policing agreements?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2012-10-03 16:01
Thank you very much, Commissioner, Minister, and Mr. Wex for attending today.
Minister, I'm just going to quickly read back to you from your statement:
Over the last decade, there have been a number of stakeholders, committees, and inquiries that have called for changes to the RCMP's accountability framework.
Later in your statement you say, “We've listened to our provincial and territorial counterparts....”
I have an example of a review that was done in the RCMP. It's from my riding in the Yukon. It's called “Sharing Common Ground”. I recognize not everybody will be familiar with the document. For the benefit of the commissioner and all Canadians, one of the things they highlight early in their executive summary is that we have heard many accounts of policing excellence, including stories of RCMP members acting above and beyond their normal duties. The purpose of the review is to improve the quality of policing services for all citizens in the territory. Certainly, I know from my constituents in the Yukon that the RCMP play a valuable role, and will continue to do so well into our future. We thank you for that commitment and dedication to service in the Yukon.
On the point raised by the opposition, Mr. Minister, about a national body reviewing these things, you spoke directly to the point that this would be counterintuitive with respect to the recommendations and things you've heard. To support that point, I would like to read a couple of sections from that executive summary.
They say “...to ensure that community needs and values are reflected in territorial policing policies and practices” is a key theme of “Sharing Common Ground”.
They highlight that “Citizens want...an effective complaints process and they want to ensure that an independent investigation will be undertaken when the RCMP is involved in a death or serious...investigation”. They want “greater input into establishing...priorities for “M” Division”, which is what Yukon's division is called.
It says, “Citizens expressed significant support for a local and responsive complaint process, and had considerable interest in the issue of 'police investigating police'”. They want input into that.
This executive summary essentially highlights what you were talking about a little earlier: that a national body would run counter to what is written here in a territorial review on policing services in M Division. Have you seen that as a similar reflection of public opinion in other provinces and other reviews?
View Ryan Leef Profile
CPC (YT)
View Ryan Leef Profile
2012-04-02 17:13
Who would take the lead in terms of an enforcement perspective? It seems to me that if something gets through the CBSA and then gets onto the 401, at that point it would get logistically difficult to start that inter-agency cooperation to figure out who is going to take the lead in Ontario.
Is there somebody tasked with that? How does that work in terms of intergovernmental enforcement application?
Results: 1 - 9 of 9

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