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Results: 1 - 15 of 519
View John Carmichael Profile
CPC (ON)
If you've been reading some of the minutes of these meetings, some of our witnesses and guests have taken exception to the constant reference to “disruptive technology”. They've used the term “transformative technology” or “transformative changes” to industry. Clearly that is one; it's very impressive.
Mr. Gupta and Ms. Hutchinson, maybe I could swing over to you for a minute. I'd like to ask you about online commerce presenting complexities for securing customers, enterprise, and government communication, all of which call for security techniques. Obviously that's your background, so that's an area I'd be curious to hear your opinion on.
What can government do to foster and capitalize on the opportunities related to the adoption of e-commerce, and how can industry associations like ITAC—I know we've talked about this at previous committee appearances—support these investments so that they're done in a safe way for both business and consumer?
View Raymond Côté Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Astle, the amendments made to the Industrial Design Act, the Patent Act and the Trade-Marks Act will never be examined by the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. What do you think about that?
View Dave Van Kesteren Profile
CPC (ON)
It was just a curiosity question, I suppose. Thank you. That's all very helpful.
Mr. Astle, oftentimes we talk about the omnibus bills. This is just a question of curiosity as well. Why was this not done sooner? It's obviously something that was necessary. Other jurisdictions are actively moving in that direction, or have moved in that direction. Why wasn't this entrenched in law sooner?
View Mark Adler Profile
CPC (ON)
View Mark Adler Profile
2015-06-04 10:17
Thank you very much.
Mr. Astle, small business is crucial to Canada's long-term prosperity, and Canadian families depend on the jobs they create and the services they provide.
That is why our government has been continuing to foster an environment for small business to grow and prosper. In fact, we've reduced red tape for small business, and we're in the process of lowering the tax rate from 11% to 9% over the next four years. We provided more assistance to small business. We have lowered EI premiums. We've frozen them. We've provided financing for small business with the small business job credit.
Could you please comment on how privilege, more specifically privilege contained within this legislation, will help small business prosper.
View Raymond Côté Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you, colleague.
Mr. Astle, you said that jurisprudence had been widely unfavourable regarding the protection of information exchanged between clients and experts in this area. Do you think that most of these judges' decisions, or a large proportion of them, were justified?
View David Sweet Profile
CPC (ON)
Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen.
Good morning everyone.
Welcome to the 42nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. We're here today pursuant to order of reference on Bill C-625.
We have some esteemed witnesses with us, but before I introduce them, Jean-François is here and he's the expert on iPads and on our move toward a paperless committee, so if anybody needs any help, Jean-François will be here for the first bit to coach and massage your technological expertise in order for you to have dominance of your iPad.
View Joe Preston Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
It does seem a bit out of place being at this end of the table, so I am in awe of the rest of you today.
I'm honoured to speak to the committee today on Bill C-625, an act to amend the Statistics Act, regarding removal of imprisonment. I'd like to thank my own constituents for their support in bringing forward this bill and the members of all parties who voted unanimously in favour of bringing it to this committee.
The principles of this bill are simple, Mr. Chair. It addresses two very important issues. First, the bill seeks to eliminate the threat of jail time for Canadians who refuse to complete mandatory surveys, and second, it will ensure historians have access to related census records, where Canadians have given their permission, 92 years after the information is collected.
With these changes to the Statistics Act, we are again delivering on promises made. Our government committed to removing the penalty of jail time for anyone who refuses to complete any mandatory survey administered by Statistics Canada. The members of my constituency asked me to do the same. The bill delivers on this commitment by eliminating the threat of jail time under sections 31 and 32 of the act. It removes this threat for those who refuse to complete the mandatory surveys and for those who deny access to administrative records. It also proposes to eliminate the threat of jail time for failing to pay a fine under those two sections.
Canadians understand the importance of the census and other surveys in which they participate. I believe that people provide their information to Statistics Canada surveys because they know that it is by far the most reliable and accurate source of Canadian socio-economic information at the national, provincial, territorial, and community levels.
Jail time is a punishment that should be reserved for the most severe crimes. Canadians should not be threatened with jail time for not filling out a survey. We have an obligation to eliminate the penalty of jail time from this section of the act and replace it with a more reasonable penalty.
This brings me to the second part of the bill, which addresses the release of historical household survey records related to the census of population 92 years after its collection. This bill delivers on that commitment by adding a provision to the Statistics Act that allows access to these records. This change echoes the decision that was made in 2005 to amend the Statistics Act and allow for the release of census records after 92 years.
The adjustments in this bill will allow for the wealth of information collected through the 2011 national household survey to be released in the year of 2103 for the Canadians who have provided their consent. I'm sure we can all agree that it is important to leave a record of present-day Canada for future generations, and with this amendment to the Statistics Act, we're giving Canadians that choice.
I would encourage my colleagues to support this important piece of legislation.
I will answer any of your questions.
View Cheryl Gallant Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Is there any information on a questionnaire, say, for a small business or agriculture, which is a small business in some cases, that would be on the census questionnaire but not be contained in an income tax return or some other federal mandatory return?
View Brian Masse Profile
NDP (ON)
View Brian Masse Profile
2015-04-28 11:15
I'm just curious as to what the intent of jail time was to begin with. What was the reason and logic to include that from the start? There has to be some history behind it because if we need a legislative club as opposed to regulation change....
View Brian Masse Profile
NDP (ON)
View Brian Masse Profile
2015-04-28 11:16
You mentioned the word “constitutional”. Obviously there must have been some thought at that time that data was so valuable that it related to the country.
In terms of our survey now and the long-form census change, what's our response rate right now? What types of results are we getting? Because that would be the only thing. This seems like a very crude element to try to keep the numbers up for reporting, but now we've moved to a voluntary process and we're eliminating—it shouldn't be used anyway—another motivating factor for people to reply to the census. We do have some people, as you've noted, who are actually going to the courts over this. It's hard to believe that's the best use of your time, but I guess some civil libertarians, perhaps, and some others might have some objection to this.
What's our return rate? Have we looked at any analysis as to whether or not this will diminish the return rate, or are there other strategies to include that?
View Brian Masse Profile
NDP (ON)
View Brian Masse Profile
2015-04-28 11:19
Thank you.
I'll conclude with this. I was part of the complete count. We did door-to-door at that time because it was important.
I'm a little disturbed by a 69% response rate. That's 30% of our population that's not communicating data to us to be used for science research, decisions with regard to how we spend our resources in this country, and social planning. That's a significant rate, so I'm hoping that we'll see some other improvements.
I thank Mr. Preston for bringing this bill forward and agree that jail time is inappropriate. At the same time, what's clearly inappropriate is when we move down from a higher rate to 69% on the first throw. I think this shows that the government is going in the wrong direction with regard to our census data collection. I'm hoping there are going to be proper resources for Statistics Canada to improve that voluntary number, because that data is critical for our social planning.
View Annick Papillon Profile
NDP (QC)
View Annick Papillon Profile
2015-04-28 11:22
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Before becoming an MP in 2011, I spent more than two years working at the Institut de la statistique du Québec. I find statistics fascinating.
While you may find it acceptable, I agree with my colleague that a 69% household response rate falls well below the significance threshold in terms of providing critical data. Having spent more than two years at the Institut de la statistique du Québec, I saw the difference in response rates between mandatory and voluntary surveys. It was day and night. The responses provided by people who are busy and have little time to spend on the questionnaire represent vital information that has to be part of the whole in order to reduce the margin of error as much as possible.
In Quebec, some people are wondering whether the province shouldn't collect all its own statistical data, questioning whether data obtained by Statistics Canada on a voluntary basis can really be trusted. They are wondering where the response threshold should be in order to provide meaningful data.
View Annick Papillon Profile
NDP (QC)
View Annick Papillon Profile
2015-04-28 11:24
Mr. Smith, you said you were satisfied with the 69% response rate for the national household survey, but do you really think that's an acceptable number?
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