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Results: 1 - 8 of 8
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
Ms. Grondin, the dust on the access road had been identified as an issue. Has that issue with the community been resolved?
View Marc Garneau Profile
Lib. (QC)
I want to bring up a point. In 2006 I was on a panel of the Government of Ontario. It was on transboundary air pollution, and it was an international panel with Americans and Canadians. It dealt with something that is part of our reality, and that is that the weather patterns do not respect borders.
In this particular case, it was a lot of airborne pollutants carried from the Ohio Valley that made their way up to southern Ontario. I was staggered to realize that there are billions of dollars in impact, not just to things like acid rain but also to the health of people who have breathing difficulties, to agriculture, and others.
To be fair, let's also point out that there are weather patterns that go the other way as well.
Is this something that should be taken up? You've talked about environmental issues, such as common pricing of carbon and things like that. What about the fact that we do export pollutants to each other on occasion?
View Marc Garneau Profile
Lib. (QC)
It's something that I was on with the Government of Ontario, but I was not aware of any federal level initiatives, because it's more than only Ontario.
View François Choquette Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you very much.
The attitude and actions of every Canadian, as well as companies and corporations, are very important. Everyone must play an active role in this initiative.
You talked about using waste incineration to create energy. Concerning air quality, you also talked about the polluting emissions the incineration process releases into the atmosphere.
The air quality issue falls largely under federal jurisdiction, since air flows among provinces. So what measures do you think the federal government could adopt to reduce the air pollution caused by incineration?
You even mentioned that greenhouse gases may be the product of that process. I would like you to elaborate a bit further on this.
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
I don't know whether I'll have time with my question to go into all that.
The next question I would have, if you accept that there are a number of different things that cause these pollutants, is that some of them are okay because they're less dangerous but are perhaps more prevalent. There's that aspect as well. You might have a smokestack, but if it's scrubbed and some of this is taken out, there's less per unit of air than there is for people in a situation on a street with a lot of pollution going by them from vehicles.
Can you say emphatically that volume is also an issue with pollution?
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
Thank you, Minister, for attending here today.
You mentioned black carbon. Black carbon is an important element in the fight against climate change. You know we both come from the two ridings that represent the high Arctic in Canada. In Canada today we produce 98,000 tonnes of black carbon a year. That's excluding that which is produced by forest fires and flaring from oil and gas production.
In a speech you gave in October to Yukon College, you said:
It's critical that the [Arctic] council help people adapt to these changes, including by sharing best practices. We must also explore together how best to advance work on short-lived climate forcing agents, like black carbon.
Since it is critical that the Arctic Council does this and explores together how best to advance work, why did you boycott the meeting of the Arctic Council task force on black carbon and methane last month? Particularly, when at the March senior Arctic official meeting in Yellowknife, Canada and the other Arctic states were adamant that the Russian military action in Crimea would not affect circumpolar cooperation. We've seen the cancelling of the meeting in Iqaluit.…
Will you continue to refuse to cooperate in future meetings of the Arctic Council on these very important issues surrounding the environment?
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and to the witnesses, thanks.
My expertise in water lies more on the Slave River and the lakes of northern Canada, so I'm curious about a number of things.
How much impact does air pollution play in the system these days?
View Anne-Marie Day Profile
NDP (QC)
Today, during question period, the issue of the ozone layer was raised. We know that in the far north, they use mostly diesel fuel. With development, that use will increase even more. You referred to alternatives, to wind energy in particular. The fact remains that the use of diesel will increase as well as the risk of pollution and problems related to the ozone layer. A thinner ozone layer means that workers may suffer the consequences, such as skin cancer among others. That means that there will be social costs and health costs involved. We are talking about workers who are going to have to agree to work under such conditions.
Given this new problem, are you doing research and development to position yourselves and find solutions? What is the situation currently?
Results: 1 - 8 of 8

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