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View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Do you have any idea what the percentage would be? Is it 50:50, is it 60:40, 75:25?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
It would be interesting to know. For example, when I give a presentation at a Legion, I would say the majority of veterans in attendance are older veterans—World War II, Korean War, Cold War types of veteran. It would be interesting to know. Perhaps we can follow up on that, then.
Let me ask a question on research to Stéphanie.
Your comment about veterans finding jobs was very interesting. You said that within five to six years, veterans generally find a job that equates to the salary they earned in the military or exceeds it. I wanted to ask just a few questions.
Are you talking about veterans with injuries who are being served by Veterans Affairs or by SISIP, or are you talking about all veterans?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, and thank you to our witnesses for being here today and participating in this study.
I have a slightly different model than I think Mr. Valeriote does. I feel the government has a primary and key role to play in the provision of services to veterans, but I certainly think that other organizations bring their own strengths to serving veterans. I'd look at it more as a mosaic. I think there's great value in the work you're doing out there, and it has to be a teamwork approach.
What I hear is that communication with the veteran, and being able to make the veteran aware of the services available, is a challenge. It's a challenge that you face and it's a challenge that we face, which is why there is promotional types of literature and advertising out to veterans to let them know what is available to them so they can plug into Veterans Affairs.
Tim, you spoke about a veteran who has gone dark in a sense. He has unplugged and he's looking after himself. It's my hope that if he sees advertising from you or from Veterans Affairs, a light might go on, and that he would say to himself, “I didn't realize that”, or “You know what, now that I see that, I'm going to plug in”, and be helped by what the government does, and by what you do as well.
I'd to focus a bit more on the study. Tim, if you don't mind, perhaps I'll use you as an example.
Let me go back to the vocational training. Let me ask first, were you a reservist or a full-time soldier?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
When you came back, did you use the vocational program to help fund the university program that you wanted to pursue?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
You weren't sure whether you would be accepted or not. You just decided to go on your own to return to university?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
All right.
Let me ask about a few other programs. If you don't mind sharing your experience with the committee in terms of how you transitioned out of the military, were you a voluntary release? Were you a medical release? Did you find that the military was looking after your needs up to the point of release? Perhaps you could share some of that with us.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Okay. Have you found within DND, then, that if.... For example, we had a presentation by the Department of National Defence at our last meeting. We were talking about categories, temporary medical categories and permanent medical categories, as well as the medical support and assessment that's provided throughout that stage or, actually, those multiple stages. The stages can last anywhere from two to five years from the time when either a serving member self-discloses and says they have an issue and they think they need medical help, or the service looks at them and says they think that member has an issue and needs medical help.
Are you able to perhaps shed some light from your experience on that process, if you don't mind? Were you part of that process of the temporary medical categories and the permanent medical categories, and did you find that the military was looking after your medical needs as you were going through that process?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
I think that's a very valid point, because I think that in the military, as I say, once the system has been flagged, they do look after their soldiers, and I think that with all the supports it eases transition into Veterans Affairs and into civilian life. It doesn't guarantee it.
Mr. Tim Laidler: That's right.
Mr. Pierre Lemieux: There are always improvements, as you say. I do agree that someone who does a voluntary release, for example, and then has to plug into Veterans Affairs, could feel that they're facing obstacles in doing so.
Mr. Tim Laidler: That's correct.
Mr. Pierre Lemieux: I'll end it there. Thank you, Chair.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you very much.
Thank you very much for being here.
When I was in the military, there was a process with a temporary medical category leading perhaps to a permanent medical category. I'm wondering if you might be able to explain that process to the committee. I ask because sometimes there is a perception that, “Oh, we have an injured soldier; he's out.” I don't think that's quite the case.
You had mentioned before that the process can take two to three years, depending on the condition. I'm wondering if you could perhaps walk us through the temporary category process, the permanent category process—with an injury that is either self-disclosed by a soldier or noticed by the system, let's say, when it's known that the soldier has an injury—and perhaps the timeframes involved. When you talk about the temporary category, phase one, can you explain some of the time periods that are involved in that?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Generally speaking, because I know it's dependent on each specific case, if I heard you correctly, you said it can take roughly six months or up to six months to determine whether or not you can even start with a temporary category process. If he's assigned a temporary category, that can last six months. There's usually a second temporary category window of another six months. At the end of that, the decision to move to a permanent category will take time on top of that. You mentioned perhaps up to two years depending on the nature of the injury. Then there's the administrative process of determining whether or not he can stay in the forces with his permanent category, and that can take six to twelve months. Then there's the actual administrative release process. When a decision is made that you don't meet the universality of service, you start the release process, and that can take up to six months. That's how you're coming up with a window of anywhere from, let's say, two years. You had mentioned three years and it looks as though it could take as long as four years.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
It depends on the nature.
Perhaps you could shed some light on the difference between someone who has a permanent medical category and who does not meet the universality of service and therefore must be medically released and the person who has a permanent medical category and yet can be retained.
Are you able to give a generic example of each of those situations?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
This might dovetail with what you said earlier about making sure that there's a continuation of care. In other words, they could be retained for a longer period of time if DMCA says so and if that can be coordinated within the trade to allow them perhaps a smoother transition back into civilian life or into civilian medical care?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Results: 121 - 135 of 1010 | Page: 9 of 68

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