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Results: 106 - 120 of 1010
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Chair, now that we've interrupted, can I raise a point of order?
When something is handed to the clerk and it's not bilingual, you can't hand it out, but can an MP ask for it just the same? Is that a prerogative I have, to say that I don't want it handed it out, but I'd like to see the material?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Okay, can I see the material that was....
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Yes, I know. That's completely understandable.
That's why I am asking. Your answer is what I thought. As an MP, I can ask to have a look at the unilingual document, if that's what I choose?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
May I have a copy, please?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
That's all I need, Chair.
Thank you very much. I was reflecting on some of your comments about post-service employment. I'm wondering if there's any work that's been done on identifying, for example, a target population among those who leave the military.
Here's what I'm thinking. I myself was in the military and I know many military members who might have been in for 25 years, for example. They leave with a 50% pension and their thinking is not that they want to find a job that pays exactly what they were earning or more than in the military. They're thinking that they might want less stressful employment, something that's a little less demanding. They'll take less salary because it's supplemented by their 50% pension. If that's not taken into consideration, it can skew the numbers on a broader study that would say, “Oh, he or she has found employment, but look, the salary is less than what they were earning in the military.” It's by choice.
I would say the same, in general, regarding people who leave on a voluntary release later in their career. Let's just say someone voluntarily releases at five years. After five years of service they're much younger and yes, they might face very different challenges than someone who voluntarily releases at 20 years whose thinking is, “Well, I've been in the military for so long and I'm freely choosing to leave the military.”
I'm wondering if those kinds of considerations were made, as far as you know, in terms of some of the statistics you've provided.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Right. I think that is the case with ill and injured veterans as well. Although it would be interesting to know the window. For example, through SISIP and through Veterans Affairs, there is medical rehabilitation that goes on, and then there's vocational training. It is quite possible, for example, for an injured veteran to leave the forces and undertake three years of vocational training. During that time, they're getting the earnings loss benefit, but from an employment perspective, they are not employed in a job earning a salary. They're moving in that direction. It would be interesting to know what the window was in terms of employment when the numbers were put together, perhaps through a study, whether it was within a year of having left the forces, within five years of having left the forces, particularly for ill and injured veterans.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Of course, Chair. I just had to explain the question.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
—critical.
Ms. Bronwen Evans: Yes.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
You've got to be careful, Chair.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you very much, Chair.
First of all I'd like to thank the Legion for having put together this particular issue. I think it was sent to all your members. I've read through it. This is excellent. It gives a very good synopsis of the old pension system, the new veterans charter, and the strengths and weaknesses of each. I think it also provides an excellent description of what is available to veterans under the new veterans charter and gives valuable guidance on how to fill out forms; in other words, with what level of detail. It's not enough just to say, “my hearing is failing and I need a benefit”. It's more a question of explaining the circumstances, linking the benefit claim to service. You have given some really good examples in this issue.
I've been out visiting with veterans and Legion members. Just so you know, I promote this because I think it has done such a great job of summarizing all of that.
Let me ask a question. Of the 300,000 members you have, what percentage would be veterans and what percentage non-veterans?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
That's good. This publication went to every member, so it would have reached 100,000 veterans, 300,000 people.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
I also noticed that in your remarks you mention, for example, that last year you represented disability claims on behalf of more than 3,000 veterans to VAC and to VRAB. I'd be interested in knowing whether you track older veterans as distinct from newer veterans. I have heard anecdotally that newer veterans tend to not plug into the Legion and the service officers, that they tend to go it themselves. But that's just anecdotal. I'd rather have something a little more factual.
Do you track that kind of information?
Results: 106 - 120 of 1010 | Page: 8 of 68

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