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Results: 76 - 90 of 1010
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
That was my next question, because you're right, the reserve parity initiative has already been implemented through regulation. There are others that require a change in the act or in law, for example, and then will be followed by regulation.
You kind of answered my question. I was going to ask whether your recommendation would be that these initiatives should be supported so they can move forward.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Great, thank you for that.
I wanted to also mention something else. We've had a number of witnesses and I know you've been reading through all the transcripts. We had SISIP come and SISIP brought with them a lot of information about the programming that they offer. One of the comments that they did not make, but which I asked about afterwards—and that's kind of why I want to raise it right now—was their accidental dismemberment insurance policy.
When a soldier is injured, I think there is a fairly good understanding about the disability award, which is roughly $300,000 or up to $300,000 depending on the nature of the injury. It is delivered by Veterans Affairs. What's not always understood is that all soldiers, serving soldiers, are paying into SISIP. One of the benefits that SISIP offers is the accidental dismemberment insurance policy, which will pay up to $250,000. This is not to be confused with the disability award for accidental dismemberment, which could include for example, the more seriously injured veterans or serving members, the loss of a limb, the loss of eyes, that type of an insurance policy. The access to concrete tangible benefits in terms of an injury has two components to it. It has the SISIP component of up to $250,000 and the disability award of up to $300,000.
I'm wondering if you have a comment on that. Is that good? Have you had many complaints about that, or have you found that veterans appreciate having up to a maximum of $500,000 worth of compensation for a more serious injury?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Good morning, Mr. Chair.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you for the question, Mr. Chair.
Certainly I note the request and I thank you for your patience.
We've had a couple of things. The first is that a number of meetings have been interrupted, as you know, by votes, so in a sense it was good that we had not booked an appearance then. Second, the minister has had a number of announcements. Those have required, of course, preparation as well as the announcements themselves. It's been a very busy time for him and his office. Third, we know the budget is coming up, so to my mind it would be appropriate for him to appear once the budget has been tabled.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Yes, Chair, I am.
I would like to thank the witnesses for coming today. I know it's been an extremely busy time, so I'm glad we were able to lock in this meeting.
I just want to confirm some information.
First, what SISIP offers to members is that when they release, if they have an injury due to service or not due to service, SISIP is there for them. It's there for them for the first two years, and if it's a disability from which they cannot return to work, it's there until the age of 65. Would that be right?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
This is particularly valuable because it covers non-service-related injuries.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Okay. So the person is in the service, but their injury could have been due to a car accident at a shopping mall on a Saturday afternoon. It was not service-related, but they were injured while they were with the military. They're covered by SISIP.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
All right.
During those first two years, or up to the age of 65, SISIP covers 75% of their salary before they left...or just as they were leaving the forces.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
What happens when someone is medically released and they have an injury related to service? They actually have a choice, I would guess; or maybe you could explain this to us. They could go to SISIP, because they have an injury that is related to service—you cover that as well—or they could go to VAC.
What's the step forward for that? What does the member normally choose? Is it completely up to them? What does the system say to them?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
So DND is the employer and SISIP is a DND-managed program. VAC programs are other programs.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
And you're saying that most or all cases will go through SISIP first, and then transition into VAC.
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Okay.
Now, DND is the owner of SISIP, but we see Manulife on the forms. What's the role of Manulife with respect to DND and the administration of SISIP?
View Pierre Lemieux Profile
CPC (ON)
Who has the most interaction with the veteran? Is it SISIP? Is it Manulife? Is it DND? Is there a coordinated response?
If I'm a veteran, and I'm injured either due to service or not due to service, and I want to start interacting with SISIP, who will I be talking to, let's say, first, second, and third? How is that coordinated for the veterans so they have a clear understanding of what SISIP is doing for them?
Results: 76 - 90 of 1010 | Page: 6 of 68

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