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Results: 1 - 15 of 224
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
Mr. Chairman, the first item on our agenda is committee business. It is important to get updates so that we know where we stand at the present time.
I believe this is what you have been trying to do for a while now. If members opposite would just let you speak, we would be able to move forward and get some more information—
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
—unless they intend to keep interrupting you in order to shut you off.
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
Mr. Chairman, I have difficulty supporting this motion. I did not object to that of Mr. Christopherson. He wants us to invite both at the same time. I am not opposed to that.
However, Mr. Saxton's motion raises a problem. If we are not able to have them appear at the same time, or if one of the two parties refuses to appear at the same time as the other, it means that we do not get to see any of the others. We will never get a chance to hear from the others if one of the two parties, either Ms. Ouimet or the Auditor General, refuses. I doubt that the latter would refuse to appear before the committee, but we have no guarantee as to what Ms. Ouimet might do. This motion would mean that if one of those two witnesses refused to appear at the same time as the other, we would not be able to see anybody else in the future. I cannot accept such a motion.
If the intent, rather than providing flexibility, is to ensure that no one else can appear before the committee, I will vote against this. I will never support this.
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
Mr. Chairman, I simply wanted to make sure that you had finished your presentation.
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
I simply wanted to be certain of that, Mr. Chairman.
Therefore, if I have your permission to speak, I would like, first of all, to give to our clerk a document that she could distribute to all committee members, which would facilitate things.
I will wait until everyone has received a copy. I am convinced that this will simplify everyone's understanding of the issue.
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Given that I have provided you with a document, I am going to read it. I am doing so in the context of committee business. It is a motion. I will read it and then I would like us to—
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
I had underscored the fact that I was making this presentation in the context of committee business. The motion reads as follows:
That the committee report the following to the House of Commons:
Whereas reports of the Auditor General of Canada are of critical importance to our democracy and whereas the Auditor General Act states that—section 5—each additional report of the Auditor General to the House of Commons made under subsection (1) shall be submitted to the House of Commons on the expiration of thirty days after the notice is sent pursuant to subsection (4) or any longer period that is specified in the notice and the Speaker of the House of Commons shall lay each such report before the House of Commons forthwith after receiving it or, if that House is not then sitting, on any of the first fifteen days on which that House is sitting after the Speaker receives it. And whereas the Speaker of the House of Commons continues to hold office during dissolution of Parliament, that notwithstanding the Act, the committee calls on the Speaker of the House of Commons, in the event of dissolution of Parliament, to post a copy of any report of the Auditor General on the Parliamentary website the same day that he receives it.
I believe this motion is relatively simple, Mr. Chairman. With your permission, I would like us to deal with it immediately.
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
Mr. Chairman, my question is clear.
Furthermore, it is not up to us, as members sitting around this table, to decide if the motion is in order. We can provide our opinion as to whether or not we think that it falls within the committee's order of business. You are the chair, we have a clerk, and we have documentation containing the information needed to verify if the question is in order or not. I believe that that fact has been well established.
I do not understand why certain members of Parliament refuse the principle of transparency. We talk about accountability, and I believe that we are in fact here faced with a refusal of transparency. One must also ask why certain members are trying to prevent things from moving forward. What are they afraid of?
We have senior officials in the House, independent officials who do their job. We ask them to ensure that all of the work done within government follows the rules. The only thing I am asking is that there be transparency, that we ensure that any reports completed by the Auditor General be presented to the public.
What is the problem with transparency? What is the problem with certain members who do not want the public to know certain things? What are people afraid of? Perhaps the report will be a positive one. Why be fearful of having the Auditor General come with a report and recommendations? Unless someone is trying to hide something.
Those members who refuse the principle of transparency should now think twice about it before making that kind of comment.
Mr. Kramp, we are talking about transparency and
accountability, it was supposed to be from your government, and you said that it's crap? I hope that next time you will think about those words before mentioning it.
Mr. Chairman, my motion is there, it remains, and I am asking that we deal with it.
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, Madam Ouimet, for being here with us this afternoon. You quit. Why? Were you pushed out of your job?
You resigned from your position. Did someone push you to do this, or were there other reasons?
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
Ms. Ouimet, you can understand that, for the people in the riding that I represent, where the average annual salary is $26,000, half a million dollars is an amount that would take them more than 20 years to accumulate. From what I can gather, the government offered you a half-million dollars if you would leave and not bother them anymore. Is that right?
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
I do understand, Ms. Ouimet, that you may have had some penalities as far as salary and pension are concerned. However, someone who leaves his or her job voluntarily cannot receive such sums of money. This is a personal decision.
I am going to read a paragraph to you in English.
The departure agreement holds a gag
It says, “the parties shall not engage in any criticism against each other, personally or through another person including media representatives....”
I can stop there, I am sure that you read all the terms of this agreement.
What I want to know is, what is it that the Prime Minister's Office does not want you to say?
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
However, Ms. Ouimet, if I recall correctly, included in the documents that we received from the Prime Minister's Office is a copy of a letter of resignation dated October 7. You are in fact the one who resigned, you were not shown the door. You yourself resigned on October 7.
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
But why did you sign a confidentiality agreement? It is nevertheless curious that the government would give you half a million dollars and state that you are not entitled to speak to anyone about what you agreed to together, nor were you entitled to discuss any agreement that you reached. Do you feel that this is acceptable? If I understand what you are saying, the Prime Minister's Office required you to sign an agreement to remain silent. The government, however, is making comments left and right but you, unlike the government, must remain silent. You were paid half a million dollars to leave your position and remain silent, even though you handed in a letter of resignation.
View Jean-Claude D'Amours Profile
Lib. (NB)
Earlier, you mentioned that you had not received any information... Nonetheless, I would like you to explain something. When you met Minister Stockwell Day, the President of the Treasury Board, did you at that time or at any other time discuss any specific cases?
Results: 1 - 15 of 224 | Page: 1 of 15

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