Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 24
View Paul Szabo Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Paul Szabo Profile
2009-11-19 12:52 [p.6955]
Madam Speaker, I will be splitting my time with the member for Eglinton—Lawrence.
Today a motion was moved to concur in the report of the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration entitled, “Migrant Workers and Ghost Consultants”. I wanted to take the opportunity to at least briefly participate in this debate from the standpoint that, having read the report and considering the seventh report, as well as the recommendations in this report, there are some very substantive issues that have been raised by a standing committee of this place whose mandate is laid out in the Standing Orders quite precisely.
Our experience with regard to committee work has been that it often falls on deaf ears.
The members of the committee work very hard. We rely upon expert witnesses. We rely upon the experience and expertise of all hon. members from all parties. We try to understand what the issues are, what the problems are, what the opportunities are and what the threats are.
When we do that work at committee, we come to a certain consensus on key issues that we believe would make eminent sense in terms of regulatory reform or legislative reform. These are reported in the report. This is an excellent report. It is very reflective of the quality of work that committees can do. It does not always represent a unanimity, but it represents a reference document with recommendations and reasons therefore, and, in some cases, sometimes often, even minority reports from one or more parties who feel that there are certain aspects of the report with which they have a divergent view.
Those reports come to this place, are tabled in the House by the chair of the committee and hon. members have an opportunity, should they wish, to move what is called a concurrence motion on a particular report so we can have a debate in the House, broaden that input and that reflection on the work that has been done, and maybe to actually enhance the debate based on the reaction of stakeholders, whether they be parliamentarians or, even beyond this place, in the public at large. This report is one that has received a lot of public attention.
With that input, it calls for and almost demands that there be a comprehensive departmental response, not only to Parliament but to the committee with regard to the work and the recommendations that it made. When committees have reports produced and tabled in the House, we can specifically ask for a formal response from the government within 120 days.
In the committee, which I chair, which is the Standing Committee for Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics, we recently did a report on what we believed would be commentary on 12 particular recommendations, 5 or 6 of which the committee was very supportive and which recommended amendments to the Access to Information Act. The other recommendations we felt would require further consideration but were worthy of being brought to the attention of the minister. We heard a great number of witnesses. We also had a comprehensive consideration of the recommendations and there was a unanimous report on behalf of all parties.
After producing this report, very similar in size and certainly with substantive recommendations, the response from the government at the end of 120 days, after we eliminate the non-specific commentary in it, represented some 300 words, according to the information commissioner of the day, Robert Marleau, who came before us and expressed his concern and his regret.
The committee passed a motion that was presented to us by the hon. member for Winnipeg Centre. The motion, which was reported to this place, was first, to express the sincere and profound disappointment of the committee in the dismissive response of the minister; second, to report that the committee recommends strongly that a completely new access to information act be presented to Parliament by March 31, 2010; and finally, that the minister responsible, who had only appeared before us for one hour throughout this entire process, be required to again appear before committee by November 30, 2009. We are waiting for that response.
I raise that because my fear is that we are facing the same kind of a dismissive attitude by the government to many committee reports to Parliament. I think that represents another reflection of the dysfunction in the operations of Parliament. Parliament must be responsive to the work of parliamentarians. The government must be respectful of the work done by committees. It must be seriously considered and, when it disagrees, it must give informative, constructive responses to the recommendations and the work that has been done by the committee members based on expert testimony and consultations, as broadly as is necessary. Those are the kinds of things that matter.
There is a minority report in this and it comes from the Liberal Party. That minority report was spawned by the view that the government of the day does not have immigration priorities that reflect the priorities and the needs of Canadians. We believe the government has not only embraced and enhanced its attitude and its legislation on immigration, but it has contracted its view toward immigration to Canada.
I recall that the phrase most often heard from the government back at the beginning of my tenure was, “Why are you letting all those criminals in?” The starting point of its attitude toward immigration was that people who were coming here were substantively criminals. The Conservatives had to justify themselves for coming into this place rather than to understand that with a declining birthrate and with the demand for skilled labour and for the compassion of family reunification, a vibrant immigration policy was vital to Canada in terms of the health and well-being of its people.
The minority report expresses that the government does not share those values. If it does not share those values, then it certainly does not share the enthusiasm of the committee with regard to these important recommendations that have been made in this report.
I am sure all hon. members know that some of the most difficult, challenging and demanding but rewarding work that we do as parliamentarians in our constituency offices is to deal with immigration and citizenship matters, whether it be visas and the like, or family reunification and sponsorship.
Canadians are very reliant on members of Parliament but too often it is the case that we have people coming to us who have a problem with officials at Citizenship and Immigration. The reason they have the problem is because somebody told them that there was a consultant they could talk to who would give them all the nice ways to fast-track their situation. Every member in this chamber has had the experience of where someone has run afoul of the officials at Citizenship and Immigration because they followed the advice of so-called immigration consultants who told them not to bother giving that information.
My contribution is simply to ask all hon. members to look very carefully at getting a response from the government.
Madame la Présidente, je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député de Eglinton—Lawrence.
Une motion a été déposée aujourd'hui en vue de l'adoption du rapport du Comité permanent de la citoyenneté et de l'immigration intitulé Les travailleurs migrants et les consultants fantômes. Je voulais profiter de l'occasion pour participer, ne serait-ce que brièvement, à ce débat en me disant que, après avoir lu le rapport et tenu compte du septième rapport et des recommandations de ce rapport, un comité permanent de la Chambre dont le mandat est précisé dans le Règlement a soulevé des points très importants.
Nous avons souvent constaté par le passé que le travail des comités n'est pas pris au sérieux.
Les membres du comité travaillent très fort. Nous comptons sur les témoins experts. Nous comptons sur l'expérience et les connaissances techniques des députés de tous les partis. Nous tentons de comprendre les points en litige, les problèmes, les points forts et les dangers.
Lorsque nous faisons un tel travail en comité, nous en arrivons à un certain consensus sur les questions importantes qui, à notre avis, seraient très sensées dans le contexte d'une réforme des règles d'application ou des lois. Le rapport en fait mention. C'est un excellent rapport qui reflète bien la qualité du travail que les comités peuvent accomplir. Les positions qu'il présente ne sont pas toujours unanimes, mais c'est un document de référence qui contient des recommandations, motifs à l'appui, et dans certains cas, et parfois souvent, même des rapports minoritaires préparés par un ou plusieurs partis qui estiment qu'il y a certains aspects du rapport avec lesquels ils ne sont pas d'accord.
Ces rapports sont présentés à la Chambre, ils y sont déposés par le président du comité et les députés ont, s'ils le désirent, la possibilité de proposer ce que l'on appelle une motion d'adoption sur un rapport en particulier pour que nous puissions en discuter à la Chambre, apporter de nouvelles réflexions et contributions sur le travail qui a été réalisé et peut-être même améliorer le débat selon les réactions des parties intéressées, qu'il s'agisse de parlementaires ou de gens du public. Ce rapport a beaucoup attiré l'attention du public.
Avec ce qu'il contient et ce qui le sous-tend, le rapport nécessite une réponse exhaustive de la part du ministère. La réponse doit être adressée non seulement au Parlement dans son ensemble, mais également au comité, en tenant compte du travail et des recommandations faits par ce dernier. Une fois qu'un comité a déposé un rapport à la Chambre, le gouvernement est tenu de fournir une réponse officielle dans les 120 jours.
Le comité que je préside, le Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique, a récemment produit un rapport contenant des observations sur 12 recommandations. Parmi ces recommandations, il y en a 5 ou 6 qui ont obtenu un fort appui des membres du comité et qui visent à modifier la Loi sur l'accès à l'information. Les autres recommandations nous ont paru nécessiter un examen plus approfondi, mais méritaient d'être portées à l'attention du ministre. Nous avons entendu un grand nombre de témoins. Nous avons examiné à fond les recommandations, et le rapport a reçu l'assentiment de tous les partis.
Cent vingt jours après avoir produit ce rapport, dont la taille est assez semblable à celle du présent rapport et qui contient certainement des recommandations substantielles, nous avons obtenu une réponse de la part du gouvernement. Abstraction faite des observations d'ordre général, la réponse du gouvernement comporte 300 mots environ, selon le commissaire à l'information de l'époque, Robert Marleau, qui est venu nous voir pour nous exprimer sa déception.
Le comité a adopté une motion qui a été présentée par le député de Winnipeg-Centre et dont il a été question aux Communes. Cette motion visait premièrement à exprimer la grande déception du comité devant la réponse méprisante du ministre. Deuxièmement, elle visait à indiquer que le comité recommande fortement une refonte de la Loi sur l'accès à l'information au moyen d'un projet de loi devant être présenté au Parlement d'ici le 31 mars 2010. Enfin, la motion voulait que le ministre chargé du dossier, qui avait comparu devant notre comité pendant une heure seulement au cours de l'étude en question, soit tenu de comparaître de nouveau au plus tard le 30 novembre 2009. Nous attendons toujours la réponse.
Si je donne cet exemple, c'est que je crains le même genre d'attitude méprisante de la part du gouvernement, à l'égard de nombreux rapports de comité présentés au Parlement. J'y vois une autre illustration du mauvais fonctionnement du Parlement. Le Parlement doit donner suite aux travaux faits par les parlementaires. Le gouvernement doit être respectueux du travail fait par les comités. Il doit considérer ce travail avec sérieux et, lorsqu'il n'est pas d'accord, il doit fournir des réponses informatives et constructives aux recommandations et au travail faits par les membres du comité, qui se fonde sur des témoignages d'experts et des consultations aussi larges que nécessaire. Voilà le genre de choses qui importent.
En annexe du rapport on trouve un rapport minoritaire du Parti libéral. C'est parce que les priorités du gouvernement actuel en matière d'immigration ne reflètent pas les priorités et les besoins des Canadiens que ce rapport minoritaire a été rendu nécessaire. Selon nous, en plus de s'enfoncer dans son attitude et de n'avoir aucune réserve par rapport à sa loi sur l'immigration, le gouvernement a un point de vue de plus en plus étroit sur l'immigration au Canada.
Je me rappelle ce que les députés ministériels répétaient le plus souvent au début de mon mandat: « Pourquoi laissez-vous entrer tous ces criminels au Canada? » C'est à force de penser que les immigrants sont pour la plupart des criminels qu'on adopte une telle attitude à l'égard de l'immigration. Les conservateurs ont dû s'expliquer pour réussir à se faire élire dans cet endroit. N'empêche, ils n'ont pas compris qu'en raison du déclin du taux de natalité, de la demande de travailleurs qualifiés et pour les motifs de compassion justifiant la réunification des familles il était crucial que le Canada se dote d'une politique d'immigration dynamique pour la santé et le bien-être des citoyens.
Le rapport minoritaire montre bien que le gouvernement ne chérit pas ces valeurs. Il n'a pas ces valeurs et il ne partage assurément pas l'enthousiasme du comité à l'égard des recommandations importantes formulées dans le rapport.
Les députés le savent, certains des aspects les plus difficiles et les plus exigeants, par ailleurs valorisants, du travail que nous faisons dans nos bureaux de circonscriptions ont trait à l'immigration et à la citoyenneté, qu'il s'agisse du traitement de documents comme des visas, de la réunification des familles ou du parrainage.
Les Canadiens ont confiance en leurs députés, mais il arrive trop souvent que des gens viennent nous voir parce qu'ils ont un problème avec les fonctionnaires du ministère de la Citoyenneté et de l'Immigration. On leur a conseillé de voir un consultant qui pourrait les aider à trouver des façons de faire progresser leur dossier; voilà l'origine de leur problème. Tous les députés connaissent des gens qui ont eu maille à partir avec le ministère de la Citoyenneté et de l'Immigration parce qu'ils ont suivi les conseils de prétendus consultants en matière d'immigration qui leur ont dit de ne pas fournir les renseignements exigés.
J'invite les députés à exiger une réponse du gouvernement.
View Paul Szabo Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Paul Szabo Profile
2009-11-18 15:18 [p.6911]
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present a report from the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics concerning the government response to the 11th report of the committee.
This has to do with a matter in which the committee had done a report and received a response from the Minister of Justice, which the committee was unsatisfied with and wanted to express its displeasure and disappointment with the response from the Minister of Justice to its 11th report, and to recommend to the government that it introduce into the House no later than March 30, 2010 a new access to information act that would reflect the committee's proceedings and recommendations, and furthermore, that the minister be invited to reappear before the committee before November 30, 2009.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai le plaisir de présenter un rapport du Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique concernant la réponse du gouvernement à son 11e rapport.
Ce rapport a été rédigé parce que le comité n'était pas satisfait de la réponse fournie par le ministre de la Justice en ce qui concerne son 11e rapport. Il a voulu exprimer son insatisfaction et sa déception à l'égard de cette réponse et recommander au gouvernement de présenter à la Chambre au plus tard le 30 mars 2010 une nouvelle Loi sur l'accès à l'information et la protection des renseignements personnels qui tienne compte de ses délibérations et de ses recommandations. Il propose également d'inviter le ministre à comparaître de nouveau devant le comité avant le 30 novembre 2009.
View Peter Milliken Profile
Lib. (ON)
I have the honour to lay upon the table the annual reports on the Access to Information and the Privacy Act of the Auditor General of Canada for the year 2008-09.
This document is deemed permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.
J'ai l'honneur de déposer les rapports annuels de la vérificatrice générale du Canada sur la Loi sur l'accès à l'information et sur la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels pour l'exercice 2008-2009.
Ce document est réputé renvoyé en permanence au Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne.
View Carole Freeman Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, when the government refused to modernize the Access to Information Act, it broke a 2005 election promise and ignored repeated requests from both the standing committee and the commissioners responsible for the act. The government said that it would clean house after the Liberals' 12-year regime, but it has all kinds of skeletons in its closet.
Why is the government refusing to be transparent? What does it have to hide?
Monsieur le Président, en refusant de moderniser la Loi sur l'accès à l'information, le gouvernement renie un engagement électoral de 2005 et contrevient à une demande maintes fois renouvelée par le comité permanent ainsi que par les commissaires responsables de cette loi. Ce gouvernement, qui prétendait faire « maison nette » après 12 ans de régime libéral, multiplie les cachotteries.
Pourquoi le gouvernement refuse-t-il de faire preuve de transparence? Qu'a-t-il à cacher?
View Rob Nicholson Profile
CPC (ON)
View Rob Nicholson Profile
2009-10-19 14:27 [p.5863]
Mr. Speaker, maybe the hon. member missed it, but we passed the Federal Accountability Act, which was the most significant step in access to information in the last 25 years in this country.
Despite opposition from the members of the Liberal Party and other members, we have now made 70 different organizations, including crown corporations, including the Canadian Wheat Board, subject to the Federal Accountability Act. That is accountability. That is transparency.
Monsieur le Président, peut-être que la députée n'est pas au courant, mais nous avons adopté la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité qui est l'une des mesures les plus importantes adoptées au cours des 25 dernières années dans ce pays en matière d'accès à l'information.
En dépit de l'opposition des députés du Parti libéral et d'autres députés, grâce à nous, 70 organismes sont maintenant assujettis à la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité, dont des sociétés de la Couronne, notamment, la Commission canadienne du blé. La responsabilité, c'est ça. La transparence, c'est ça.
View Carole Freeman Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, he did not answer the question, but whatever.
The government came up with an economic plan that does not meet Quebec's needs, and now it is hiding information about the true impact of its most recent budget from Parliament and the Parliamentary Budget Officer.
Why is the government hiding the truth from Quebeckers?
Monsieur le Président, il n'a pas répondu à la question, mais enfin.
En plus de présenter un plan économique qui ne répond pas aux besoins du Québec, ce gouvernement s'entête à cacher au Parlement et au directeur parlementaire du budget les informations permettant d'estimer les retombées de son dernier budget.
Pourquoi le gouvernement cache-t-il la vérité aux Québécois?
View Rob Nicholson Profile
CPC (ON)
View Rob Nicholson Profile
2009-10-19 14:28 [p.5863]
Mr. Speaker, the government is committed to transparency and openness. This is why we have done more than has been done in many, many years under previous Liberal administrations.
Instead of complaining, the hon. member should get up on her feet and applaud this government for all it has done for transparency and accountability.
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement tient à la transparence et à l'ouverture. C'est pour cela que nous en avons fait plus que les libéraux n'en ont jamais fait au cours des nombreuses années pendant lesquelles ils formaient le gouvernement.
Au lieu de se plaindre, la députée devrait se lever et applaudir le gouvernement pour tout ce qu'il a fait en matière de transparence et de responsabilité.
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2009-10-09 12:03 [p.5813]
Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 109 of the House of Commons I am pleased to table, in both official languages, the response of the Government of Canada to the 11th report of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics entitled “The Access to Information Act: First Steps Towards Renewal”, tabled in the House on June 18.
Also, pursuant to Standing Order 109 of the House of Commons I am pleased to table, in both official languages, the response of the Government of Canada to the 10th report of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics entitled “The Privacy Act: First Steps Towards Renewal”.
Monsieur le Président, conformément à l'article 109 du Règlement de la Chambre des communes, j'ai le plaisir de présenter, dans les deux langues officielles, la réponse du gouvernement du Canada au onzième rapport du Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique intitulé La Loi sur l’accès à l’information: premiers pas vers un renouvellement, présenté à la Chambre le 18 juin.
Aussi, conformément à l'article 109 du Règlement de la Chambre des communes, j'ai le plaisir de présenter, dans les deux langues officielles, la réponse du gouvernement du Canada au dixième rapport du Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique intitulé La Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels: premiers pas vers un renouvellement.
View Denise Savoie Profile
NDP (BC)
View Denise Savoie Profile
2009-10-09 12:21

Question No. 279--
Hon. Judy Sgro:
With respect to the Veterans Affairs program for the compensation of those who were exposed to Agent Orange: (a) how did the government come to the decision on the years that would be covered for those who were exposed; (b) how did the government arrive at the compensation amount of $20,000; (c) why will the government not compensate the widows of those who were exposed and met the qualifying conditions, but who have since passed away; (d) how many applications for compensation has the government received to date; (e) how many of those applications have been approved; (f) how many applications have been denied; (g) how many of those denied were refused because the veteran has since passed away; (h) how many of the applications denied were due to a medical condition that was not deemed to meet the government’s criteria; (i) what mechanisms did the government use to determine which illnesses would be covered and which would not be considered for compensation; (j) how many cheques have been issued and delivered; and (k) was the departmental funding cut of $33.6 million completely due to a program criteria which resulted in lower than expected numbers of beneficiaries?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 317--
Mrs. Carol Hughes:
With regards to the performance of the access to information system in the government for fiscal years 2005-2006 to 2008-2009, for each department and agency subject to the Access to information Act: (a) what was the number of requests received; (b) what was the number of requests answered within the 30 day time limit; (c) what was the number of requests answered within 60 days; (d) what was the number of requests answered within 90 days; (e) what was the number of requests answered within 120 days or more; (f) what is the number that were appealed to the Information Commissioner; (g) what is the number of deemed refusal complaints found by the Commissioner; (h) what is the number of request that have been referred to the courts; (i) what is the number of requests that have been ordered to be released by a court; and (j) what is the amount spent on administration of the Act?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 327--
Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:
With respect to Dorchester Penitentiary: (a) how many plans are there for renovating or completely rebuilding it; (b) what are the operating costs associated with each of these plans; and (c) is the government currently implementing any of these plans and, if not, why not?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 403--
Mr. Andrew Kania:
With respect to federal infrastructure spending in the constituency of Brampton West, what was the total amount of government funding since fiscal year 2005-2006 up to and including the current fiscal year, itemized according to: (a) the date the money was requested in the riding; (b) the dollar amount requested; (c) the dollar amount received; (d) the program from which the funding came; (e) the department responsible; and (f) the designated recipient?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 405--
Mr. Andrew Kania:
With respect to applications to sponsor family members for visitor’s visas and permanent residency, made by residents of the constituency of Brampton West: (a) what is the average processing time for applications made to sponsor family members from (i) India, (ii) Pakistan, (iii) all countries aggregated; (b) what is the approval rate for applications made to sponsor family member from (i) India, (ii) Pakistan, (iii) all countries aggregated; (c) what are the top five main grounds for denying claims and their rates of usage for applications made to sponsor family members from (i) India, (ii) Pakistan, (iii) all countries aggregated; and (d) what are the details of all refusals with the dates, names and reasons?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question no 279 --
L'hon. Judy Sgro:
En ce qui concerne le programme du ministère des Anciens combattants visant à indemniser les personnes qui ont été exposées à l’agent orange: a) comment le gouvernement a-t-il décidé quelles années pourraient ouvrir droit à une indemnisation; b) comment le gouvernement est-il arrivé à fixer l’indemnité à 20 000 $; c) pourquoi le gouvernement n’indemnisera-t-il pas les veufs et veuves de personnes exposées à l’agent orange qui satisfont aux conditions d’admissibilité, mais qui sont maintenant décédées; d) combien de demandes d’indemnisation le gouvernement a-t-il reçues jusqu’à maintenant; e) combien de demandes ont été approuvées; f) combien de demandes ont été rejetées; g) combien des demandes ont été rejetées parce que l’ancien combattant visé était décédé; h) combien de demandes ont été rejetées parce que l’affection de la personne visée ne correspondait pas aux critères du gouvernement; i) quels mécanismes le gouvernement a-t-il utilisés pour déterminer quelles affections ouvriraient droit ou non à une indemnisation; j) combien de chèques ont été émis et envoyés; k) la réduction de 33,6 millions de dollars du budget du ministère était-elle entièrement attribuable aux critères restrictifs du programme d’indemnisation qui ont fait que le nombre de demandes acceptées a été plus bas que prévu?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 317 --
Mme Carol Hughes:
En ce qui concerne le rendement du système d’accès à l’information au sein du gouvernement pour les exercices 2005-2006 à 2008-2009, pour chaque ministère et organisme assujetti à la Loi sur l’accès à l’information, par exercice: a) combien de demandes de renseignements ont été reçues; b) à combien de ces demandes a-t-on répondu dans la limite prévue de 30 jours; c) à combien de ces demandes a-t-on répondu dans les 60 jours; d) à combien de ces demandes a-t-on répondu dans les 90 jours; e) à combien de ces demandes a-t-on répondu dans les 120 jours ou plus; f) combien de demandes ont été portées en appel devant le Commissaire à l’information; g) combien de plaintes le Commissaire a-t-il considérées comme des présomptions de refus; h) combien de demandes ont été portées devant les tribunaux; i) combien de fois un tribunal a-t-il ordonné que les renseignements soient fournis; j) combien d’argent est consacré à l’administration de la Loi?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 327 --
L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:
En ce qui a trait à la Prison de Dorchester: a) combien de plans y a-t-il pour y mettre des rénovations ou pour la reconstruire complètement; b) quels sont les coûts d’opérations pour chacun de ces plans; c) le gouvernement met-il actuellement en œuvre un de ces plans et, si non, pourquoi?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 403 --
M. Andrew Kania:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses d’infrastructure fédérales dans la circonscription de Brampton-Ouest, combien ont-elles totalisé depuis l’exercice 2005-2006 jusqu’au présent exercice inclusivement, avec dans chaque cas: a) la date de la demande de fonds en circonscription; b) le montant de la demande; c) le montant reçu; d) le programme d’origine des fonds; e) le ministère responsable; f) le bénéficiaire désigné?
Response
(Le document est déposé)

Question no 405 --
M. Andrew Kania:
En ce qui concerne les demandes de parrainage de membres de la famille en vue du visa de visiteur ou de la résidence permanente présentées par des résidents de la circonscription de Brampton-Ouest: a) quel est le temps moyen de traitement des demandes de parrainage de membres de la famille originaires (i) de l’Inde, (ii) du Pakistan, (iii) de tous pays confondus; b) quel est le taux d’approbation des demandes de parrainage de membres de la famille originaires (i) de l’Inde, (ii) du Pakistan, (iii) de tous pays confondus; c) quels sont les cinq principaux motifs de refus et leur fréquence d’utilisation à l’égard des demandes de parrainage de membres de la famille originaires (i) de l’Inde, (ii) du Pakistan, (iii) de tous pays confondus; d) quels sont les détails de tous les refus avec les dates, les noms et les raisons?
Response
(Le document est déposé)
View Peter Milliken Profile
Lib. (ON)
I have the honour to lay upon the table the 2008-09 annual report on the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act from the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer.
This document is deemed to have been permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.
J'ai l'honneur de déposer sur le bureau le rapport annuel de 2008-2009 concernant la Loi sur l'accès à l'information et la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels du Bureau du directeur général des élections.
Ce document est renvoyé d'office au Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne.
View Peter Milliken Profile
Lib. (ON)
I have the honour to lay upon the table the 2008-09 annual report on the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act from the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.
This document is deemed to have been permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.
J'ai l'honneur de déposer sur le bureau le rapport annuel de 2008-2009 concernant la Loi sur l'accès à l'information et la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels du Commissariat aux langues officielles.
Ce document est renvoyé d'office au Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne.
View Rob Nicholson Profile
CPC (ON)
View Rob Nicholson Profile
2009-09-30 15:13 [p.5377]
Mr. Speaker, pursuant to the provisions of section 72 of the Access to Information Act and section 72 of the Privacy Act, I rise today to table the annual reports of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal for the fiscal year 2008-09.
Monsieur le Président, conformément aux dispositions de l'article 72 de la Loi d'accès à l'information et à l'article 72 de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, je dépose aujourd'hui les rapports annuels du Tribunal canadien des droits de la personne pour l'exercice 2008-2009.
View Peter Milliken Profile
Lib. (ON)
I have the honour to lay upon the table the annual reports on the Access to Information and Privacy Act of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada for the year 2008-09.
These reports are deemed to have been referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.
J'ai l'honneur de déposer sur le bureau les rapports annuels de la commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada concernant la Loi sur l'accès à l'information et la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels pour l'exercice 2008-2009.
Ces documents sont réputés renvoyés en permanence au Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne.
View Paul Szabo Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Paul Szabo Profile
2009-06-18 10:09 [p.4757]
Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 11th report of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics entitled “The Access to Information Act: First Steps Towards Renewal”.
This report outlines the work that the committee has done with regard to potential changes to the Access to Information Act. Pursuant to Standing Order 109 the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to this report within 120 days of its presentation.
I would like to thank all hon. members who participated on the committee, permanent members and also those who participated in support of the committee. Our thanks as well to the House of Commons and Library of Parliament personnel, the clerk, the research analysts, translators, and other technical and support personnel who were invaluable in helping us to organize our hearings for this report and reports throughout this Parliament.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai l'honneur de présenter, dans les deux langues officielles, le onzième rapport du Comité permanent de l’accès à l’information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l’éthique intitulé La Loi sur l’accès à l’information: premiers pas vers un renouvellement.
Ce rapport décrit les travaux du comité en ce qui concerne les modifications qui pourraient être apportées à la Loi sur l'accès à l'information. Conformément au paragraphe 109 du Règlement, le comité demande à ce que le gouvernement présente une réponse à ce rapport dans les 120 jours suivant la présentation de ce dernier.
Je remercie tous les députés qui ont participé aux délibérations du comité, les membres permanents du comité, de même que les députés qui ont aidé le comité dans ses travaux. Je remercie également le personnel de la Chambre des communes et de la Bibliothèque du Parlement, le greffier, les analystes de la recherche, les traducteurs et autres employés techniques et de soutien qui nous ont fourni une aide inestimable pour organiser nos audiences en vue de la présentation de ce rapport et d'autres rapports au Parlement.
View Peter Milliken Profile
Lib. (ON)
I have the honour to lay upon the table the annual reports on the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act of the Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada for the year 2008-09.
These documents are deemed to have been permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.
J'ai l'honneur de déposer sur le bureau les rapports annuels de 2008-2009 concernant la Loi sur l'accès à l'information et la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels du commissaire à l'information du Canada.
Ces documents sont renvoyés d'office au Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne.
Results: 1 - 15 of 24 | Page: 1 of 2

1
2
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data