Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 548
View Judy Wasylycia-Leis Profile
NDP (MB)
View Judy Wasylycia-Leis Profile
2009-12-10 10:10 [p.7868]
Mr. Speaker, on this day, which is United Nations Human Rights Day, I believe that if you were to seek it, you would find unanimous consent for the following motion. I move, seconded by the hon. member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, that this House calls upon the government to ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities which was tabled in the House by the government on Thursday, December 3, 2009, as soon as all provinces have given their consent.
Monsieur le Président, en cette Journée des droits de l'homme décrétée par les Nations Unies, vous constaterez, je crois, qu'il y a consentement unanime à l'égard de la motion suivante. Je propose, avec l'appui du député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, que la Chambre demande au gouvernement de ratifier la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées, déposée à la Chambre par le gouvernement le jeudi 3 décembre 2009, dès que toutes les provinces auront donné leur consentement.
View Peter Milliken Profile
Lib. (ON)
Does the hon. member for Winnipeg North have the unanimous consent of the House to propose this motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: No.
La députée de Winnipeg-Nord a-t-elle le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour proposer cette motion?
Des voix: D'accord.
Des voix: Non.
View Judy Wasylycia-Leis Profile
NDP (MB)
View Judy Wasylycia-Leis Profile
2009-12-10 15:13 [p.7914]
Mr. Speaker, I have a motion, seconded by the hon. member for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, for which I believe, if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent. It is on this day, United Nations Human Rights Day, and the day when the Olympic torch entered the chamber, that I would like to move:
That this House calls upon the government to ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities which was tabled in the House on Thursday, December 3, 2009, as soon as all provinces and territories have officially given their consent and that this House expresses the hope that ratification is achieved by the time of the paralympic games.
Monsieur le Président, je propose une motion, avec l'appui du député de Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, à l'égard de laquelle vous obtiendrez, je crois, le consentement unanime de la Chambre. Aujourd'hui, en cette Journée internationale des droits de l'homme des Nations Unies, journée pendant laquelle la flamme olympique est entrée dans cette Chambre, je voudrais proposer:
Que la Chambre demande au gouvernement de ratifier la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées, déposée à la Chambre le jeudi 3 décembre 2009, dès que toutes les provinces et tous les territoires auront donné leur consentement officiel, et que la Chambre exprime son espoir de voir la Convention ratifiée à temps pour les Jeux paralympiques.
View Peter Milliken Profile
Lib. (ON)
Does the hon. member for Winnipeg North have the unanimous consent of the House to propose this motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Speaker: The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
La députée de Winnipeg-Nord a-t-elle le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour présenter cette motion?
Des voix: D'accord.
Le Président: La Chambre a entendu la motion. Plaît-il à la Chambre de l'adopter?
Des voix: D'accord.
View Gordon O'Connor Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I think if you were to seek it, you would find agreement for the following motion. I move:
That, in relation to its study of Arctic sovereignty, 12 members of the Standing Committee on National Defence be authorized to travel to Yellowknife, Northwest Territories; Elmendorf Air Force Base, Anchorage, Alaska, U.S.A.; and Winnipeg, Manitoba, in February/March 2010 and that the necessary staff accompany the Committee.
Madame la Présidente, j'invoque le Règlement. Je pense que si vous le demandez, vous constaterez qu'il y a consentement unanime à l'égard de la motion suivante. Je propose:
Que, relativement à son étude de la souveraineté dans l'Arctique, 12 membres du Comité permanent de la défense nationale soient autorisés à se rendre à Yellowknife (Territoires du Nord-Ouest); à la base des forces aériennes Elmendorf, à Anchorage, (Alaska, É.-U.); et à Winnipeg (Manitoba) aux mois de février et mars 2010, et que le personnel nécessaire accompagne le comité.
View Denise Savoie Profile
NDP (BC)
View Denise Savoie Profile
2009-12-10 16:45 [p.7926]
Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to move this motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Acting Speaker (Ms. Denise Savoie): The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Le député a-t-il le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour présenter cette motion?
Des voix: D'accord.
La présidente suppliante (Mme Denise Savoie): La Chambre a entendu la motion du député. Plaît-il à la Chambre d'adopter la motion?
Des voix: D'accord.
View Gordon O'Connor Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, I think if you were to seek it, you would find agreement for the following motion. I move
That, in relation to its study of high speed rail in Canada, 12 members of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities be authorized to travel to La Pocatière, Québec, in January/February 2010 and that the necessary staff accompany the Committee.
Madame la Présidente, je pense que si vous le demandez, vous constaterez qu'il y a consentement unanime à l'égard de la motion suivante. Je propose:
Que, relativement à son étude du train à grande vitesse au Canada, 12 membres du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités soient autorisés à se rendre à La Pocatière (Québec) aux mois de janvier et février 2010, et que le personnel nécessaire accompagne le comité.
View Denise Savoie Profile
NDP (BC)
View Denise Savoie Profile
2009-12-10 16:45 [p.7926]
Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to move this motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Acting Speaker (Ms. Denise Savoie): The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Acting Speaker (Ms. Denise Savoie): It is my duty, pursuant to Standing Order 38, to inform the House that the questions to be raised tonight at the time of adjournment are as follows: the hon. member for Gatineau, Museums; the hon. member for Etobicoke North, Health.
Le député a-t-il le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour présenter cette motion?
Des voix: D'accord.
La présidente suppliante (Mme Denise Savoie): La Chambre a entendu la motion du député. Plaît-il à la Chambre d'adopter la motion?
Des voix: D'accord.
La présidente suppléante (Mme Denise Savoie): Conformément à l'article 38 du Règlement, je dois faire connaître à la Chambre les questions qu'elle abordera à l'heure de l'ajournement ce soir, à savoir: l'honorable député de Gatineau, Les musées; l'honorable députée d'Etobicoke-Nord, La Santé.
View Daniel Paillé Profile
BQ (QC)
View Daniel Paillé Profile
2009-12-08 11:48 [p.7764]
Mr. Speaker, how could anyone be against a bill that allows the provinces to harmonize taxes that affect everyone? We must ask ourselves this question. In Quebec, we do not understand how anyone could oppose it, since we harmonized our taxes in 1992. At that time, we thought it was only right that we should take over the management of our own affairs. It was only natural for us to govern in a different way. Business was business at that time, and accordingly, for services rendered, the Government of Canada reimbursed the Government of Quebec $130 million a year for administrative costs. It is an administrative arrangement: the federal government has what it has for $130 million. This has nothing to do with compensation.
At the time, the Government of Canada did not offer any compensation. As least that is what it said, until it offered three provinces—New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland—compensation equivalent to 1.5 percentage points of the tax base. That is how those three maritime provinces received nearly $1 billion, $961 million to be exact, beginning in April 1996, to be paid over four years, thereby compensating for 100% of the difference for the first two years, 50% for the third year, and 25% for the fourth year. No matter what administrative arrangements were made, there were arrangements and there was compensation.
It is up to the provinces to decide whether to let the Government of Canada collect the tax. I see this as yet another difference between Quebec and the Canadian provinces. Quebeckers would rather we control our own tax revenue ourselves. That is one of our rights, one of the rights we have claimed, one of the rights we exercise, and nobody is going to come and take that away from us.
However, since 1996, Canada's tax system has been blatantly unfair. The maritime provinces were compensated, but Quebec was not. Of course, there are those who say that since 1995, the federal government has been allowed to do whatever it wants to Quebec.
The value-added tax system is a much better system that Quebec has favoured for ages. This is another example of what a great job Quebec is doing running its own affairs. It is doing such a great job that Canada's two largest provincial economies have now accepted that this is the best way to do things and are working on harmonizing their taxes.
And now, in one fell swoop, the Government of Canada wants to be in charge of collecting these taxes for free on top of providing compensation.
Compensation for these two provinces is more than peanuts. It will be around $4.3 billion for Ontario and $1.6 billion for British Columbia, a total of $5.9 billion in current 2009 dollars. Those two provinces will cash in, but Quebec will still get nothing.
This morning, one of the speakers estimated that the $5.9 billion will actually end up costing a little over $10 billion because of the interest that the Government of Canada will have to pay on the money it borrows to pay that $5.9 billion.
I did the opposite calculation and came up with some numbers of my own. If the government has owed Quebec $2.6 billion since 1992, what would that be worth today? How much? At an interest rate of 5% over 17 years—I did this properly using a 5% interest rate, not 10%—the current value of the $2.6 billion owing to Quebec since 1992 would be $6 billion. Now, $6 billion compared to $5.9 billion, that is saying something.
In other words, what the federal government will be giving Ontario and British Columbia is equivalent, in today's dollars, to what has been owed to Quebec since 1992. It could not be more unfair.
But we have no intention of interfering in the negotiations between the federal government and the Government of Quebec regarding the compensation. They have the power to negotiate and we will let them do so. But in order to negotiate, you need at least two parties.
One has to wonder about the willingness of the federal government to negotiate with Quebec. Despite a unanimous motion from the Quebec National Assembly, we have not gotten anything. When their interests are at stake, Quebeckers generally support the minister, regardless of his or her party.
The former Quebec finance minister had a very long exchange with Canada's Minister of Finance. Ms. Jérôme-Forget was practically waving a white flag in one of the letters that she sent to the current federal Minister of Finance, because she said that she would give him what he wanted.
She told the minister that he was right to open the door to compensation for Ontario, and that we would do everything we could to get the same compensation. Seven years ago, the door was also opened to British Columbia, but the door is always slammed in Quebec's face. Ms. Jérôme-Forget wrote the following:
—with respect to all the pertinent clauses, the agreement will be modelled for the most part on the Canada-Ontario agreement signed last March.
The Canada-B.C. agreement is the same as the Canada-Ontario agreement.
I cannot be accused of partisanship since we are not in the same party.
The more the Minister of Finance agreed to what the federal Minister of Finance asked for, the more he asked for. He does not seem to want to resolve the issue. It is as though, during a three-period hockey game, the federal government decided that the players would play four quarters of football and, in the fourth quarter, that the players would play nine innings of baseball and then, in the ninth inning, it claimed to have made a mistake and decided that the players would now play 18 holes of golf.
It has been 17 years. If they want to play golf, they will be resolving the issue next year.
I therefore call on the Minister of Finance of Canada to show that he can manage the public purse fairly. It is his duty to compensate Quebec pronto, because Quebec harmonized its tax 17 years ago. He should respect the people of Quebec and their National Assembly.
All Quebeckers support the current Minister of Finance, Mr. Bachand, who is the member for Outremont. I am deliberately mentioning the minister's riding. Quebeckers do not really understand why the other member for Outremont, who sits here, is going to vote against the bill. All Quebeckers support the provincial member for Outremont. Only one federal member from Quebec does not support the bill, and that is the member for Outremont. I am sure that it is because his motto is “Canada first”.
Of course, any bill can be improved, but I believe that this one respects the provinces' jurisdiction. Since that is a rare occurrence these days, we will vote in favour of the bill.
Some provisions do leave me confused, though, such as the advance notice required for changes in provincial value-added tax rates. From now on, the provinces will have to notify the federal government 120 days before making any changes. This means that a provincial finance minister will no longer be able to announce in a budget speech that effective at midnight, the tax rate will go down or up by a given percentage. I am getting into administrative details, but the fact remains that the substance of the bill is good.
The bill offers less flexibility and is sort of a Canadian compromise.
My first official speech in this House supports the unanimous motion in the National Assembly, where I sat for 15 years, including the beginning of the harmonization period. The motion read:
WHEREAS Québec was the first province to harmonize with the Federal goods and services tax (GST) in the early 1990s: [I was there]
WHEREAS since then, three Atlantic provinces have harmonized with the GST in 1997 and have received compensation for this from the Federal Government totalling close to 1 billion dollars;
WHEREAS the Government of Ontario announced that it would harmonize its sales tax with the GST beginning on 1 July 2010;
WHEREAS the Federal Government will grant a 4.3 billion dollar compensation to Ontario for this harmonization, an amount that is justified in the Canada-Ontario memorandum of understanding particularly owing to the desire to stimulate economic growth and job creation, and the Federal Government will administer this new provincial tax free of charge on behalf of Ontario;
WHEREAS the Ontario sales tax will be very similar to the Québec sales tax (QST) since certain goods, such as books [that is important to us], will not be subject to the provincial tax and that input tax refunds in Ontario may be identical to those agreed to by Québec for an 8-year period;
WHEREAS Ontario is the fourth province to receive compensation from the Federal Government as part of the harmonization of the provincial and federal sales taxes, while Québec has not received any compensation to this day even though it was the first province to harmonize its sales tax;
BE IT RESOLVED THAT the National Assembly ask the Federal Government to treat Québec justly and equitably, by granting compensation that is comparable to that offered to Ontario for the harmonization of its sales tax with the GST, which would represent an amount of 2.6 billion dollars for Québec.
The National Assembly of Québec voted on that motion on March 31, 2009. Naturally, British Columbia was not there.
This should be respected. In my opinion, this first speech also condones fiscal freedom for the provincial governments. Subtle or not, the result is that there is a certain respect for provincial jurisdictions. I am calling on the Government of Canada to continue in that vein and compensate Quebec.
This first speech also reflects the views of an independent thinker who is practical, realistic and patient and who realizes again and again that having just one fiscal policy, ours, and just one collection authority, ours, would be a much better way to run Quebec. Add to that all our own laws and signing our own agreements and what we have is the definition of sovereignty.
Monsieur le Président, comment être contre un projet de loi qui permet aux provinces d'harmoniser des taxes qui touchent tout le monde. C'est une question qu'on doit se poser. Au Québec, on ne peut comprendre qu'on puisse être contre puisque nous sommes harmonisés depuis 1992. À cette époque, on avait trouvé normal de prendre en main notre propre gestion de nos affaires. C'était normal d'avoir une autre façon de gouverner. Business was business à cette époque, et ainsi, pour des services rendus, le gouvernement du Canada remboursait le gouvernement du Québec pour ses frais administratifs de 130 millions de dollars par année. C'est un arrangement administratif: le gouvernement fédéral a ce qu'il a pour 130 millions de dollars. Cela n'a rien à voir avec une compensation.
À l'époque, le gouvernement du Canada n'offrait pas de compensation. Du moins, c'est ce qu'il disait, jusqu'à ce qu'il offre à trois provinces — le Nouveau-Brunswick, la Nouvelle-Écosse et Terre-Neuve — une compensation équivalente à 1,5 point de l'assiette fiscale. C'est ainsi que ces trois provinces Maritimes ont reçu, à partir d'avril 1996, une somme de près de 1 milliard de dollars, soit 961 millions de dollars, versée sur quatre ans, compensant ainsi les différences des deux premières années à 100 p. 100, de la troisième année à 50 p. 100 et de la quatrième année au quart. Peu importe l'arrangement administratif, il y a eu arrangement et il y a eu compensation.
Que ces provinces choisissent de laisser la perception de cette taxe au gouvernement du Canada, c'est leur affaire. À mon avis, cela montre encore une fois l'une des différences entre les provinces canadiennes et le Québec. Au Québec, nous préférons avoir le fruit de nos impôts et de nos taxes et de nous gérer nous-mêmes. C'est un droit que nous avons, c'est un droit que nous prenons, c'est un droit que nous exerçons et personne ne viendra nous l'enlever.
Toutefois, depuis 1996, il y a donc une iniquité fiscale au Canada qui est manifeste. Les provinces Maritimes ont été compensées, mais pas le Québec. Bien sûr, certains diraient que depuis octobre 1995, tout est permis par le fédéral au Québec.
Le système de la taxe sur la valeur ajoutée est un bien meilleur système qui est reconnu par le Québec depuis belle lurette. C'est un autre exemple de l'excellente qualité de la gestion des affaires au Québec. C'est tellement bon que les deux plus grosses économies provinciales du Canada réalisent maintenant que cela devrait être ainsi et proposent de s'harmoniser.
C'est ainsi que d'un coup de baguette, le gouvernement du Canada se dit favorable à prendre en charge la perception de ces taxes gratuitement et sans frais en offrant même des compensations.
Les deux compensations ne sont pas innocentes. On parle de 4,3 milliards de dollars pour l'Ontario et de 1,6 milliard de dollars pour la Colombie-Britannique, soit un total de 5,9 milliards de dollars en valeur actuelle, c'est-à-dire en dollars de 2009, qui seront donnés aux provinces. Pendant ce temps, il n'y a toujours rien pour le Québec.
Ce matin, l'un des intervenants évaluait que la somme de 5,9 milliards de dollars allait équivaloir à un peu plus de 10 milliards de dollars, à cause des intérêts que le gouvernement du Canada paiera sur les emprunts qu'il fera pour payer le montant de 5,9 milliards de dollars.
Or, j'ai fait le calcul inverse et j'ai fait un petit exercice. Si on doit au Québec 2,6 milliards de dollars depuis 1992, combien cela vaut-il aujourd'hui? Combien? À un taux d'intérêt de 5 p. 100 sur 17 ans — j'ai été correct, je n'ai pas pris un taux de 10 p. 100, j'ai pris 5 p. 100 —, la valeur actuelle des 2,6 milliards de dollars que l'on doit au Québec depuis 1992 représente 6 milliards de dollars. Or, 6 milliards de dollars relativement à 5,9 milliards de dollars, cela dit quelque chose.
Autrement dit, ce que l'on va donner, par l'entremise du fédéral, à l'Ontario et à la Colombie-Britannique équivaut, en dollars actuels, à ce qu'on doit au Québec depuis 1992. On ne pourrait pas être plus inéquitable.
Cependant, nous n'avons pas l'intention de nous mêler des négociations entre le gouvernement fédéral et le gouvernement du Québec sur la compensation. Ils ont le pouvoir de négocier et laissons-les négocier. Mais pour négocier, encore faut-il qu'il y ait au moins deux parties.
On peut se questionner sur la volonté du gouvernement fédéral de négocier avec le Québec. Malgré une motion unanime de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec, nous n'avons rien obtenu. Quand leurs intérêts sont en jeu, les Québécois appuient généralement le ministre, et ce, peu importe le parti qu'il représente.
L'ex-ministre des Finances du Québec a échangé une très longue correspondance avec le ministre des Finances du Canada. Une des lettres qu'a adressées Mme Jérôme-Forget au ministre des Finances actuel du Canada était presqu'un drapeau blanc, car elle disait qu'elle lui donnerait ce qu'il voulait.
On disait au ministre qu'il était correct d'avoir ouvert la porte à une compensation à l'Ontario et qu'on fera tout pour obtenir la même compensation. Il y a sept ans, on a aussi ouvert la porte à la Colombie-Britannique, mais on ferme toujours la porte au Québec. Mme Jérôme-Forget a écrit ceci:
[...] à l'égard de toutes les clauses pertinentes, ce protocole s'inspirera largement du protocole Canada-Ontario conclu en mars dernier.
Le protocole Canada-Colombie-Britannique est le même que le protocole Canada-Ontario.
On ne m'accusera pas de partisanerie puisque nous ne sommes pas dans le même parti politique.
Plus la ministre des Finances acceptait ce que lui demandait du ministre des Finances du Canada, plus ce dernier en demandait. Il semble ne pas vouloir régler la question. C'est comme si, au cours d'un match de hockey de trois périodes, le fédéral décidait qu'on joue quatre quarts de football et qu'au quatrième quart, on joue neuf manches de baseball, et qu'à la neuvième manche, disant s'être trompé, on joue maintenant 18 trous de golf.
Cela fait 17 ans. S'ils veulent jouer au golf, ils vont régler la question l'année prochaine.
Je demande donc au ministre des Finances du Canada de se montrer équitable dans la gestion des finances publiques. Il est de son devoir de compenser le Québec illico, qui a harmonisé sa taxe il y a 17 ans. Qu'il respecte les Québécois et leur assemblée nationale.
Tous les Québécois appuient l'actuel ministre des Finances, M. Bachand, député d'Outremont. Je mentionne sciemment la circonscription du ministre. Au Québec, on ne comprend vraiment pas pourquoi l'autre député d'Outremont, celui qui siège ici, votera contre le projet de loi. Tous les Québécois appuient le député d'Outremont du Québec. Seul un député fédéral du Québec est en désaccord, et c'est celui d' Outremont. Je suis certain que c'est parce qu'il se dit que c'est « Canada first ».
Bien sûr, on peut toujours améliorer un projet de loi, mais je pense que celui-ci respecte la compétence des provinces. Comme c'est quelque chose qui est rare ces temps-ci, on votera en faveur du projet de loi.
Certaines dispositions me laissent toutefois perplexe, comme le délai relatif aux variations des taux provinciaux sur les valeurs ajoutées. Dorénavant, il faut aviser le gouvernement fédéral 120 jours avant d'apporter des modifications. Ainsi, un ministre provincial des Finances ne pourra plus annoncer, lors de son discours sur le budget, qu'à compter de minuit, le taux de la taxe baissera ou augmentera de tel pourcentage, comme il pouvait le faire par le passé. On s'enfarge dans des détails administratifs, mais il reste que le fond du projet de loi est bon.
Le projet de loi offre moins de flexibilité et constitue une sorte de compromis à la canadienne.
Ce premier discours officiel en cette Chambre vient appuyer la motion unanime de l'Assemblée nationale où j'ai siégé il y a 15 ans, soit au début de la période d'harmonisation. Cette motion disait:
Attendu que le Québec a été la première province à s’harmoniser avec la taxe sur les produits et services — TPS — fédérale au début des années 1990; [j'y étais]
Attendu que depuis ce temps, trois provinces de l’Atlantique se sont harmonisées à la TPS en 1997 et qu’elles ont reçu à ce titre une compensation du gouvernement fédéral de près de 1 milliard de dollars;
Attendu que le gouvernement de l’Ontario a annoncé qu’il allait harmoniser sa taxe de vente à la TPS à compter du 1er juillet 2010;
Attendu que le gouvernement fédéral versera une compensation de 4,3 milliards de dollars à l’Ontario au titre de cette harmonisation, montant qui est justifié dans le protocole d’entente Canada-Ontario notamment par le désir de stimuler la croissance économique et la création d’emplois, et que le gouvernement fédéral administrera gratuitement cette nouvelle taxe provinciale au nom de l’Ontario;
Attendu que la taxe de vente ontarienne sera très similaire à la taxe de vente du Québec puisque certains biens, comme les livres [pour nous, c'est important], ne seront pas assujettis à la taxe provinciale et que les remboursements de la taxe sur les intrants en Ontario pourront être identiques à ceux consentis par le Québec pendant une période s’étalant sur 8 ans;
Attendu que l’Ontario est la quatrième province à recevoir du gouvernement fédéral une compensation au titre de l’harmonisation des taxes de vente provinciale et fédérale, alors que le Québec n’a reçu aucune compensation à ce jour bien qu’elle ait été la première province à harmoniser sa taxe de vente;
Il est résolu que l’Assemblée nationale demande au gouvernement fédéral de traiter le Québec avec justice et équité, en lui versant une compensation comparable à celle offerte à l’Ontario pour l’harmonisation de sa taxe de vente à la TPS, ce qui représenterait un montant de 2,6 milliards de dollars pour le Québec;
Cette motion a été votée le 31 mars 2009 à l'Assemblée nationale du Québec. Bien sûr, la Colombie-Britannique n'était pas là.
On devrait respecter cela. À mon avis, ce premier discours est aussi favorable à la liberté fiscale des gouvernements provinciaux. Que ce soit délicatement ou non, le résultat est là, il y a un certain respect des champs de compétence. Je demande donc au gouvernement du Canada de continuer dans cette veine et de compenser le Québec.
Ce premier discours est aussi le témoignage d'un indépendantiste qui, tout en étant pratique, réaliste et patient, comprend encore et encore qu'une seule politique fiscale, la nôtre, et qu'une seule autorité de perception, la nôtre, seraient une bien meilleure façon de gérer le Québec. Ajoutons à cela toutes nos lois et la signature de tous nos accords, et nous avons la simple définition d'une souveraineté.
View Rodger Cuzner Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Rodger Cuzner Profile
2009-12-08 17:44 [p.7814]
Mr. Speaker, I move:
That, notwithstanding any Standing Orders or usual practice of the House, the deferred recorded divisions on the motion to concur in the eighth report of the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans and on the motion for the third reading of Bill C-291, an act to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (coming into force of sections 110, 111 and 171), scheduled for Wednesday, December 9, 2009, be further deferred until Thursday, December 10, 2009, at the expiry of the time provided for government orders.
Monsieur le Président, je propose:
Que, nonobstant tout article du Règlement ou usage habituel de la Chambre, les votes par appel nominal différés sur la motion portant adoption du huitième rapport du Comité permanent des pêches et océans et sur la motion portant troisième lecture du projet de loi C-291, Loi modifiant la Loi sur l’immigration et la protection des réfugiés (entrée en vigueur des articles 110, 111 et 171), différés au mercredi 9 décembre soient de nouveau différés jusqu'au jeudi 10 décembre à la fin de période prévue pour les Ordres émanant du gouvernement.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2009-12-08 17:45 [p.7814]
Does the opposition whip have unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Deputy Speaker: The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Le whip de l'opposition a-t-il le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour présenter la motion?
Des voix: D'accord.
Le vice-président: La Chambre a entendu la motion. Plaît-il à la Chambre de l'adopter?
Des voix: D'accord.
View Jay Hill Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, with respect to the consideration of the motion under government orders, Government Business No. 8, I move:
That the debate be not further adjourned.
Monsieur le Président, relativement à l'étude de l'initiative ministérielle no 8, je propose:
Que le débat ne soit plus ajourné.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2009-12-07 12:44 [p.7661]
It is my duty now to interrupt the proceedings and put forthwith every question necessary to dispose of the motion now before the House.
The question is on the motion that the debate be not further adjourned. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: No.
The Deputy Speaker: All those in favour of the motion will please say yea.
Some hon. members: Yea.
The Deputy Speaker: All those opposed will please say nay.
Some hon. members: Nay.
The Deputy Speaker: In my opinion the nays have it.
And five or more members having risen:
The Deputy Speaker: Call in the members.
Je dois interrompre les délibérations et mettre aux voix sur-le-champ la motion dont la Chambre est saisie.
Le vote porte sur la motion portant que le débat ne soit plus ajourné. Plaît-il à la Chambre d'adopter la motion?
Des voix: D'accord.
Des voix: Non.
Le vice-président: Que tous ceux qui sont en faveur de la motion veuillent bien dire oui.
Des voix: Oui.
Le vice-président: Que tous ceux qui s’y opposent veuillent bien dire non.
Des voix: Non.
Le vice-président: À mon avis, les non l'emportent.
Et cinq députés ou plus s'étant levés:
Le vice-président: Convoquez les députés.
View Peter Milliken Profile
Lib. (ON)
I declare the motion carried.
The Speaker: The House resumed consideration of the motion.
When the matter was last before the House, the hon. member for Hamilton Mountain had the floor for questions and comments consequent upon her speech. There are five minutes remaining in the time allotted for questions and comments for the hon. member for Hamilton Mountain.
I recognize the hon. member for Mississauga South on questions and comments.
Je déclare la motion adoptée.
Le Président: La Chambre reprend l'étude de la motion.
La dernière fois que la Chambre a débattu de la question, la députée de Hamilton Mountain avait la parole et il restait cinq minutes du temps réservé aux questions et observations à la suite de son discours.
Je donne la parole au député de Mississauga-Sud pour des questions ou des observations.
View Jay Hill Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, there have been extensive consultations among all parties and if you were to seek it, I think you would find unanimous consent for the following motion. I move:
That, notwithstanding any Standing Order or usual practice of the House, at 2 p.m. on Thursday, December 10, 2009, the House resolve itself into committee of the whole in order to welcome torchbearers carrying the Olympic flame; that the Speaker be permitted to preside over the committee of the whole and make welcoming remarks on behalf of the House; and, when the proceedings of the committee have concluded or at 2:20 p.m., whichever comes first, the committee shall rise and the House shall resume its business as though it were 2 p.m., provided that the time taken for the proceedings be added to the time provided for government orders on that day.
Monsieur le Président, il y a eu des consultations exhaustives entre les partis et je pense que vous constaterez qu'il y a consentement unanime à l'égard de la motion suivante. Je propose:
Que, nonobstant tout article du Règlement ou usage habituel de la Chambre, la Chambre se forme en comité plénier à 14 heures, le jeudi 10 décembre 2009, afin d’accueillir les porteurs de la flamme olympique; que le Président soit autorisé à présider les délibérations du comité plénier et à livrer le mot de bienvenue au nom de la Chambre; qu’à la fin des délibérations du comité ou à 14 h 20, selon la première éventualité, le comité lève sa séance et la Chambre reprenne ses travaux comme s’il était 14 heures, pourvu que le temps consacré aux délibérations du comité plénier soit ajouté aux Ordres émanant du gouvernement ce jour-là.
Results: 1 - 15 of 548 | Page: 1 of 37

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data