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Results: 16 - 30 of 83
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
View Phil McColeman Profile
2010-04-01 16:06
Thank you, Chair.
Thank you to the witnesses for being here today and taking the time to share your expertise with us.
There was a reference in one presentation to the drug Suboxone, and that's the first time I've heard of it. Perhaps other committee members heard of it for the first time. I'd like to find out a little bit more about this drug. Obviously, we know about methadone, but is this something new? Is it cutting edge? And what does it do--obviously the same types of effects, outcomes, but how does it differ from methadone?
Kate Jackson
View Kate Jackson Profile
Kate Jackson
2010-04-01 16:07
Without getting into a lot of technical detail, it's a slightly different chemical compound, but it works very much the same way as methadone, and it's administered differently.
We introduced it because it's starting to be introduced in community programs and in other programs outside the correctional environment. It's been shown to be an effective alternative sometimes for people who can't tolerate methadone, or if for some reason methadone doesn't work for them.
We currently only have one person on Suboxone.
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
View Phil McColeman Profile
2010-04-01 16:08
Okay.
The next question is relating to the long-term dependency. As you've said, many people never get off their dependency on the methadone or the alternative opiates. These are probably expensive drugs, I would think. Are they covered under health plans for them after they're released?
View Brent Rathgeber Profile
CPC (AB)
What about methadone and this other substance, suboxone? Are those not a more effective and better way of dealing with inmates who have addiction problems than handing out needles?
View Maria Mourani Profile
BQ (QC)
View Maria Mourani Profile
2010-04-01 17:09
Let us look at it from the perspective of the Correctional Service Canada. The mandate of the Correctional Service is to offer programs to combat drug addiction, to help people overcome a drug addiction.
What do you think about the disconnect between our giving needles and everything to people in prison so that they can take drugs, and banning drugs from prison and offering programs that teach people how to work on themselves to beat the addiction and stop taking drugs?
Sandra Ka Hon Chu
View Sandra Ka Hon Chu Profile
Sandra Ka Hon Chu
2010-04-01 17:10
I don't think it's ambivalence. I think it's a recognition of the reality that people use drugs. In the community, we ban drugs, and we provide needle and syringe programs based on the public health and cost evidence. So I think it would be a recognition of the reality that people are suffering from addictions. They don't necessarily access treatment for whatever reason, and we want to prevent disease from being transmitted.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
My last question is on a statement you make on page 19 of your report that PNSPs “facilitate referrals of users to drug addiction treatment programs”. You made the point that it actually doesn't lead to increased drug use, but it actually may lead to accessing drug treatment. Can you maybe elaborate on that for us?
Sandra Ka Hon Chu
View Sandra Ka Hon Chu Profile
Sandra Ka Hon Chu
2010-04-01 17:15
Yes. In evaluations where these programs exist, the frank conversations that prisoners have with health care staff and with peer health workers who have been trained on harm reduction and drug addiction and treatment have led to referrals of people to drug treatment programs. So that was what the evidence has demonstrated. It creates an opportunity for a conversation with health care staff, peer health workers, or external NGOs.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you. Merci beaucoup.
It's nice to see you again, Madame Vallée. I will speak in English, if that's okay, but feel free to answer in English or French, as you're comfortable.
As you know, we're studying addictions and mental health in the corrections system, so I'm going to try to zero in on that.
On page 10 of your remarks you have some statistics about people who complete substance abuse programs in the institutions. You have a time period, from 2009 to 2010--it's close to our parliamentary fiscal year--during which 420 offenders began a substance abuse program and 326 completed the program. You say that this is a 78% success rate. That is upon completion, I take it.
A voice: It is completion.
Mr. Don Davies: I'm just wondering if you keep statistics on long-term sobriety or cleanliness so that we can track a year later, three years later, or five years later how well the addictions therapy is working.
Christine Perreault
View Christine Perreault Profile
Christine Perreault
2010-03-23 16:07
We don't have those numbers with us, but in fact, yes, we do keep statistics on long-term success--five years, ten years.
Are you talking about relapse, and whether they go back to substance abuse?
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
Many offenders will be released into the community under conditions. I take it you would certainly have statistics on a large number of people who have left the institution and remain under conditions.
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
I would like to know that, if possible. Thank you.
On page seven of the presentation,you have some statistics on reoffending rates. Two things jumped out at me. One is that it shows how low the reoffending rate is for many people. I think you said that in 2008-09 CSC kept statistics on the rate for reoffending during supervision and only 0.74% of all supervised offenders reoffended during this period. It tells a layperson like myself that there is a very low rate for reoffending.
View Rick Norlock Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and thank you to the witnesses for coming.
I have a few different questions in different areas. The first is that we had a witness here not too long ago, a very fine witness who has settled a lot of her addiction issues and is of value in helping other people in similar circumstances. I was intrigued when we spoke to her about methadone and the methadone treatment and she said one of the reasons she became addicted to heroin was her use of methadone. I just wondered if you had similar experiences. What's your experience with methadone and this treatment, and have you seen that sort of reverse of the norm in your institution?
Christine Perreault
View Christine Perreault Profile
Christine Perreault
2010-03-23 16:59
I will have to get back to you on this. Sorry, I don't have that kind of information.
View Rick Norlock Profile
CPC (ON)
Yes, that was one thing. But in general, what is your experience with the treatment? Is it positive? Do you believe there are alternatives, or is it just part of the tools in your valise of treatment?
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