Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 25633
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, there have been discussions among the parties and if you seek it I think you will find unanimous consent to adopt the following motion: That, notwithstanding any Standing Order, Special Order or usual practices of the House: (a) the report stage amendment to Bill C-6, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (conversion therapy), appearing on the Notice Paper in the name of the Minister of Justice, be deemed adopted on division; (b) Bill C-6 be deemed concurred in at report stage on division; and (c) the third reading of Bill C-6 be allowed to be taken up at the same sitting.
Madame la Présidente, il y a eu des discussions entre les partis, et je pense que vous constaterez qu'il y a consentement unanime à l'égard de la motion suivante: Que, nonobstant tout article du Règlement, ordre spécial ou usage habituel de la Chambre: a) l'amendement à l'étape du rapport du projet de loi C-6, Loi modifiant le Code criminel (thérapie de conversion), inscrit au Feuilleton des avis au nom du ministre de la Justice, soit réputé adopté avec dissidence; b) le projet de loi C-6 soit réputé adopté à l'étape du rapport avec dissidence; et c) le projet de loi C-6 puisse être étudié à l'étape de la troisième lecture au cours de la même séance.
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
All those opposed to the hon. member moving the motion will please say nay.
An hon. member: Nay.
Que tous ceux qui s'opposent à ce que le député propose la motion veuillent bien dire non.
Une voix: Non.
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
There is one motion in amendment standing on the Notice Paper for the report stage on Bill C-6. Motion No. 1 will be debated and voted upon.
Une motion d'amendement figure au Feuilleton des avis pour l'étude à l'étape du rapport du projet de loi C-6. La motion no 1 sera débattue et mise aux voix.
View David Lametti Profile
Lib. (QC)
moved:
Motion No. 1
That Bill C-6, in Clause 5, be amended by replacing line 31 on page 4 with the following:
320.101 In sections 320.102 to 320.105, conversion.
propose:
Motion no 1
Que le projet de loi C-6, à l’article 5, soit modifié par substitution, à la ligne 32, page 4, de ce qui suit:
320.101 Aux articles 320.102 à 320.105, thérapie de.
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2021-04-16 10:03 [p.5729]
Madam Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Waterloo, the Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth.
I want to begin by acknowledging that I am speaking today from the traditional territory of many nations, including the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg—
Madame la Présidente, je vais partager mon temps de parole avec la députée de Waterloo, la ministre de la Diversité et de l’Inclusion et de la Jeunesse.
Tout d'abord, je souligne que j'interviens aujourd'hui depuis le territoire de nombreuses nations, y compris les Mississaugas de Credit, les Anishnabes...
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
I have to interrupt the hon. parliamentary secretary as he needs unanimous consent to split his time.
Does the hon. member have unanimous consent to share his time?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Je dois interrompre le secrétaire parlementaire, car il doit obtenir le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour partager son temps de parole.
Le député a-t-il le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour partager le temps de parole qui lui est alloué?
Des voix: D'accord.
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2021-04-16 10:04 [p.5729]
Madam Speaker, as I said, I begin by acknowledging I am speaking from the traditional territory of many nations including the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinabe, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat peoples. It is now home to many diverse first nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. I commit every day to honour the treaties by which we share this land, which is ultimately a gift to us from our Creator.
I rise today in the House for the third reading of this important bill which brings forward amendments to the Criminal Code and moves us closer to seeing an end to the damaging practice of conversion therapy, a practice that continues to harm LGBTQ communities in Canada and around the world. This insidious and harmful practice must finally be put to a stop and this bill will bring about that important change.
That is the formal way I would normally start a speech in this House, by acknowledging the land we are on, name the bill and give my opinion on it, but I want to start again to simply say I am a gay man and this is a bill with amendments to the Criminal Code that is deeply personal and incredibly important to me.
While I do not expect everyone to relate to this bill the way I do and acknowledge the fact that out of 338 members in this place there are only four out, self-identified, open LGBTQ members, much smaller than the proportion in Canada's population, I do expect every member in this House to truly wrestle with what it means for them to vote against this bill. If they say they are voting against it as a matter of conscience, then I believe they need to stare deeply into that conscience and ask themselves, “Why would I want to perpetuate an injustice against another human being, a friend, a colleague, a family member, a neighbour, a constituent, anyone who will be hurt by that action; hurt perhaps to the point of death?” Why would they not want to stand with the vulnerable, with the oppressed, with the stigmatized, with the people who need their help the most?
I have heard and read the speeches against these amendments. They are tired and worn-out arguments that come from an age that I had thought we escaped long ago. The political rhetoric is there, trying to not sound like they are living in the stone Age, saying they are not against conversion therapy, just against this bill. They claim that the definition is too broad, that there are drafting errors in the bill, or they say that the escape clauses for religious bodies, escape clauses to help them avoid living up to God's command are not clear enough or wide enough, but I would say to them, as the prophet Micah did:
He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?
It is time for us to talk truth in this place. If someone is against this bill, frankly, they are against me and against people like me, saying ultimately that we are less than they are, that somehow God made a mistake when God created us and that we should change who we are or at least consider changing who we are. I am here to say today that I am not going to change. I do not want to change and no one should be told that they have to change or should change the way God made them to be.
Conversion therapy, at its core, implies that being gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer or two-spirited is somehow wrong. I am here to say that that is not true. I am here to say it is time for this House to declare it by putting to bed the myth that conversion therapy can ever be right in any circumstance in any place at any time. We already know well that LGBTQ communities in Canada have faced and continue to face social and economic disadvantages, and disparities in health, safety, employment, income and housing. These disparities are all linked to historic and systemic stigmatization and discrimination toward my community.
According to a report prepared by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health, and based on a series of expert testimony and submissions, a wide range of health disparities are noted, including barriers to accessing health services. Notably, issues persist whereby LGBTQ2 communities are still not able to discuss their sexual orientation with their physician or, if they do, they often need to educate themselves, their health professionals, about their health needs. That same report highlights disparities in employment, income and housing. Strikingly, of the 40,000—
Madame la Présidente, comme je le disais, je veux tout d'abord souligner que j'interviens depuis le territoire de nombreuses nations, y compris les Mississaugas de Credit, les Anishnabes, les Chippewas, les Haudenosaunee et les Wendats. On y trouve de nos jours diverses communautés autochtones, métisses et inuites. Je m'engage à honorer tous les jours les traités selon lesquels nous partageons ces terres, qui, ultimement, sont un cadeau de notre Créateur.
J'interviens aujourd'hui à la Chambre à l'étape de la troisième lecture d'un projet de loi important qui vise à modifier le Code criminel et à nous rapprocher de l'objectif qu'est l'élimination de la thérapie de conversion, une pratique néfaste qui continue de faire du tort aux communautés LGBTQ du Canada et du monde entier. Il est grand temps de mettre fin à cette pratique sournoise et nuisible et le projet de loi nous permettra de faire ce changement important.
C'est ma façon conventionnelle d'entamer un discours à la Chambre: en reconnaissant le territoire sur lequel nous nous trouvons, en nommant le projet de loi à débattre et en donnant mon opinion à son sujet, mais je veux recommencer en disant simplement que je suis homosexuel et les modifications que ce projet de loi propose d'apporter au Code criminel me touchent profondément et revêtent une importance immense à mes yeux.
Bien que je ne m'attende pas à ce que tous puissent se sentir concernés par ce projet de loi comme je le suis, et que sur les 338 députés de cette enceinte, seuls quatre ont déclaré faire partie de la communauté LGBTQ, ce qui constitue une proportion beaucoup plus faible que dans la population canadienne en général, je m'attends à ce que chacun des députés s'interroge sur la signification d'un vote contre ce projet de loi. Si un député affirme vouloir voter contre pour une question de conscience, je crois qu'il devrait alors faire une introspection et se demander: « pourquoi voudrais-je perpétuer une injustice à l'égard d'un autre être humain, d'un ami, d'un collègue, d'un membre de ma famille, d'un voisin, d'un électeur ou de quiconque en subirait les conséquences, peut-être jusqu'à en mourir? » Pourquoi ne voudrait-il pas se tenir aux côtés des personnes vulnérables, opprimées, ou stigmatisées, bref, des personnes qui ont le plus besoin de son aide?
J'ai entendu et lu les discours contre les modifications. Ce sont des arguments fatigués et usés qui proviennent d'une époque que je croyais révolue depuis longtemps. Il y a de la rhétorique politique; les intervenants essaient de ne pas donner l'impression de vivre à l'âge de pierre lorsqu'ils disent qu'ils ne sont pas contre la thérapie de conversion, mais simplement contre le projet de loi. Ils prétendent que la définition est trop large, qu'il y a des erreurs de rédaction dans le projet de loi ou que les dispositions de dérogation pour les organismes religieux, c'est-à-dire les dispositions de dérogation qui visent à les aider à se défiler devant les commandements de Dieu, ne sont pas assez claires ou assez larges, mais je leur répondrais par ces paroles du prophète Michée:
On t'a fait connaître, ô homme, ce qui est bien; Et ce que l'Éternel demande de toi, C'est que tu pratiques la justice, Que tu aimes la miséricorde, Et que tu marches humblement avec ton Dieu.
Il est temps pour nous de parler de vérité à la Chambre. Franchement, si quelqu'un s'oppose au projet de loi, il est contre moi et contre les gens comme moi, car il dit essentiellement que nous sommes moins que lui, que Dieu a fait une erreur en nous créant et que nous devrions changer qui nous sommes ou du moins envisager de changer qui nous sommes. Je suis ici pour dire aujourd'hui que je ne vais pas changer. Je ne veux pas changer et personne ne devrait se faire dire qu'il doit changer ou qu'il devrait changer ce que Dieu a fait de lui.
La thérapie de conversion sous-entend essentiellement qu'être gai, lesbienne, bisexuel, transgenre, queer ou bispirituel est en quelque sorte inacceptable. Je tiens à dire que c'est faux. Je tiens à dire qu'il est temps que la Chambre le proclame en dissipant le mythe voulant qu'il puisse être acceptable dans certains cas et à certains moments d'avoir recours à la thérapie de conversion. Nous sommes déjà bien conscients que les communautés LGBTQ au Canada ont subi et continuent à subir des désavantages sociaux et économiques ainsi que des inégalités en matière de santé, de sécurité, d'emploi, de revenu et de logement. Ces inégalités sont liées à la stigmatisation et à la discrimination historiques et systémiques dont a été victime ma communauté.
Un rapport préparé par le Comité permanent de la santé de la Chambre des communes, qui se fonde sur une série de témoignages d'experts et de mémoires, a signalé de multiples inégalités en matière de santé, notamment des obstacles à l'accès aux services de santé. Plus particulièrement, les membres de la communauté LGBTQ2 éprouvent encore des difficultés: ils sont toujours incapables de discuter de leur orientation sexuelle avec leur médecin ou, s'ils le font, ils doivent souvent informer leurs professionnels de la santé ou s'informer eux-mêmes sur leurs besoins en santé. Le même rapport souligne des inégalités en matière d'emploi, de revenu et de logement. Étonnamment, parmi les 40 000...
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
I apologize for interrupting the hon. parliamentary secretary. We are at report stage, not third reading, and he had only five minutes.
The hon. member for Kingston and the Islands.
Je m'excuse d'interrompre le secrétaire parlementaire, mais nous sommes à l'étape du rapport et non à l'étape de la troisième lecture, et il ne disposait que de cinq minutes.
Le député de Kingston et les Îles a la parole.
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, I think if you seek it, you would find unanimous consent for the following motion. I move:
That, notwithstanding any Standing Order, Special Order or usual practices of the House:
a) the report stage amendment to Bill C-6, An Act to amend the Criminal Code, (conversion therapy), appearing on the Notice Paper in the name of the Minister of Justice, be deemed adopted on division;
b) Bill C-6 be deemed concurred in at report stage on division; and
c) the third reading stage of Bill C-6 be allowed to be taken up at the same sitting.
Madame la Présidente, je crois que vous constaterez qu'il y a consentement unanime à l'égard de la motion suivante. Je propose:
Que, nonobstant tout article du Règlement, ordre spécial ou usage habituel de la Chambre:
a) l’amendement à l’étape du rapport du projet de loi C-6, Loi modifiant le Code criminel (thérapie de conversion), inscrit au Feuilleton des avis au nom du ministre de la Justice, soit réputé adopté avec dissidence;
b) le projet de loi C-6 soit réputé adopté à l’étape du rapport avec dissidence;
c) le projet de loi C-6 puisse être étudié à l’étape de la troisième lecture au cours de la même séance.
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
All those opposed to the hon. member moving the motion will please say nay.
The House has heard the terms of the motion. All those opposed to the motion will please say nay.
Hearing no dissenting voice, I declare the motion carried.
Que tous ceux qui s'opposent à ce que le député propose la motion veuillent bien dire non.
La Chambre a entendu la motion. Que tous ceux qui sont contre veuillent bien dire non.
Comme il n'y a pas de voix dissidentes, je déclare la motion adoptée.
View Bardish Chagger Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Bardish Chagger Profile
2021-04-16 10:11 [p.5730]
moved that the bill be read the third time and passed.
 propose que le projet de loi soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2021-04-16 10:11 [p.5730]
Madam Speaker, I seek the unanimous consent of the House to split my time with the Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth.
Madame la Présidente, je demande le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour partager le temps de parole dont je dispose avec la ministre de la Diversité et de l’Inclusion et de la Jeunesse.
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
Does the hon. member have unanimous consent?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Le député a-t-il le consentement unanime?
Des voix: D'accord.
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2021-04-16 10:11 [p.5730]
Madam Speaker, I expect this will be even better the second time.
I want to begin by acknowledging that I am speaking from the traditional territory of many nations, including the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinabe, the Chippewa and the Haudenosaunee and Wyandot peoples, which is also now home to many diverse first nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. I commit every day to honour the treaties by which we share this land, which is ultimately a gift to us from our Creator.
I rise today in the House for the third reading of this important bill, which brings forward amendments to the Criminal Code and moves us closer to seeing an end to the damaging practice of conversion therapy: a practice that continues to harm LGBTQ2 communities in Canada and around the world. These insidious and harmful practices must finally be put to a stop, and this bill would bring about an important change to the laws of Canada.
That is the formal way to start a speech in this place: We acknowledge the land we are on, name the bill we are speaking to, remind the House what its ramifications are and state clearly whether we support it and why.
However, I want to start again and simply say I am a gay man. This is a bill that makes amendments to the Criminal Code. It is a bill that is deeply personal and incredibly important to me. I acknowledge that out of 338 members in this place, there are only four out, self-identified and open LGBTQ2 members, a much smaller proportion than in the population of Canada. While I do not expect everyone to relate to this bill the way I do, I do expect every member in the House to truly wrestle with what it means for them to vote against this bill.
If members say they are voting against it as a matter of conscience, then they need to stare deeply into their conscience and ask themselves why they would want to perpetrate an injustice against another human being, friend, colleague, family member, neighbour, constituent or anyone who would be hurt by that action, perhaps to the point of death. Why would they not want to stand with the vulnerable, the oppressed and the stigmatized? These are the people who need their help the most.
I have heard or read the speeches against these amendments. For me, they are tired and worn-out arguments that come from an age I thought we had escaped decades ago. The political rhetoric is there, the members trying not to sound like they are still living in the stone age. They say they are not against conversion therapy, they are just against this bill. They claim the definition is too broad, or there are drafting errors in the bill, or they say the escape clauses for religious bodies, which help them avoid living up to God's command, are not clear or wide enough.
I say to them, as the prophet Micah did, “He has told you, oh mortal, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God.” It is time for us to talk truth in this place. If someone is against this bill, they are against me and against people like me. They are saying ultimately that we are less than they are, that somehow God made a mistake when God created us and that we should change who we are or at least consider changing who we are.
I am here to say today I am not going to change, and no one should be told that they have to change or should change or even could change who God made them to be. Conversion therapy, at its core, implies that being gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer or two-spirited is wrong. This is not true, and it is time for the House to declare that by putting to bed the myth that conversion therapy can ever be right, in any circumstance or in any place at any time.
We already know very well that LGBTQ2 communities in Canada have faced, and continue to face, a set of social and economic disadvantages. These include disparities in health, safety, employment, income and housing. These disparities are linked to historic and systemic stigmatization and discrimination against LGBTQ2 communities.
According to a report by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health and based on a series of expert testimonies and submissions, a wide range of health disparities are noted. These include barriers to accessing health services, and issues persisting whereby LGBTQ2 individuals are still not able to discuss their sexual orientation with their physicians, or if they do, they have to be the ones to educate their own health professionals about their health needs.
The same report highlights disparities in employment, income and housing. Strikingly, of the 40,000 homeless youth in Canada, between 25% and 40% identify as being part of the LGBTQ2S community.
Just this week, retired Ontario Court of Appeal justice Gloria Epstein's long-awaited independent review found serious flaws in the way Toronto police handled the case of serial killer Bruce McArthur, whose killing spree from 2010-17 left at least eight gay men dead. Justice Epstein said that McArthur's victims were “marginalized and vulnerable in a variety of ways”, and their disappearances were often given less attention or priority than they deserved by the police. They were gay, and many of them were racialized or from communities that police simply did not care much about.
Underneath these findings is the stark truth that the lack of attention is not simply incompetence on the part of the Toronto police force, it is a deeply embedded homophobia. It is systemic homophobia. That kind of homophobia, which leads to people dying and being killed, is only furthered when society allows things like so-called conversion therapy to be practised. Conversion therapy, which undermines the value, the worth and the dignity of LGBTQ2S people aids and abets those who would discriminate against, hurt, damage or kill us.
It is true that, throughout all this, LGBTQ2 communities continue to demonstrate great resilience, resourcefulness, innovation and strength. However, dangerous attitudes and beliefs underpin and fuel all of this. Discrimination is real, stigma is real and harassment is real. Even though hurtful attitudes and beliefs about our community continue to exist, they need to be challenged and they need to be stopped. Thanks to the good work of the Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth and the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, we in the House have a chance to do just that by supporting this bill.
It is not LGBTQ2 people and communities who need to be changed or converted. Harmful prejudice, homophobia, transphobia and all forms of discrimination need to be changed and converted into justice, compassion, understanding and respect. Ultimately, they need to be converted into love. That is what we will be able to do collectively as we support this bill and bring it into law to build a better Canada for everyone.
A vast breadth of sexual orientations, gender identities and gender expressions exists. That is nothing to fear. We must, as a society, reach a point where we all understand that each person's sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression are intrinsic parts of who we are. We need to embrace these in ourselves and in other people, even when we do not fully comprehend what they mean.
That is why this is such an important bill. Conversion therapy is based on misinformed assumptions and harmful beliefs. By moving forward with stopping the harmful practice of conversion therapy, we are not only moving to stamp out this practice and protect the lives of LGBTQ2 communities and people, we are also sending an important message. Our gender identities, our gender expressions and our sexual orientations are essential parts of who we are and they are not up for debate. They should be understood, appreciated and celebrated. Then we can have a truly inclusive, cohesive society.
It is obvious I was not born yesterday, which everyone can tell by my tired look. That simply means that I have seen tremendous advances in attitudes toward people like me. Just as I was beginning to understand my sexual orientation, the late prime minister Pierre Trudeau ensured that I would not be a criminal if I chose to act on my sexuality and love another man. I saw the emergence of human rights legislation and court decisions based on the charter that gave me a chance to marry my partner with whom I have shared almost 30 years. I have seen my government apologize to those hurt by systemic homophobia in the public service, the military and our national police force.
Now I am going to be in this virtual chamber when we take the next step to ban conversion therapy. We are not done yet. Old attitudes take a long time to die and a long time to bury, but this is our chance—
Madame la Présidente, je pense que ce sera encore mieux la seconde fois.
Je voudrais d'abord reconnaître que je me joins à vous à partir du territoire traditionnel de nombreuses nations, dont les Mississaugas de Credit, les Anishinabes, les Chippewas, les Haudenosaunee et les Wendats, sans oublier les divers peuples des Premières Nations, des Inuits et des Métis qui y habitent maintenant. Chaque jour, je m'emploie à honorer les traités en vertu desquels nous partageons ce territoire, qui est essentiellement un cadeau de notre Créateur.
Je prends la parole aujourd'hui à la Chambre à l'étape de la troisième lecture de cet important projet de loi qui propose des modifications au Code criminel et qui constitue un pas de plus vers l'élimination de la thérapie de conversion, une pratique qui fait encore beaucoup de mal à des membres de la communauté LGBTQ2 au Canada et ailleurs dans le monde. Il est temps que ces démarches insidieuses et dommageables cessent, et ce projet de loi entraînerait un important changement dans les lois du Canada.
Voilà la manière officielle de commencer un discours dans cette enceinte: reconnaître le territoire sur lequel nous nous trouvons, nommer le projet de loi à débattre, rappeler à la Chambre quels sont les enjeux et dire clairement si nous appuyons ou non le projet de loi et pourquoi.
Cependant, j'aimerais revenir à mon discours en disant, tout simplement, que je suis homosexuel. Les modifications que ce projet de loi propose d'apporter au Code criminel me touchent profondément et revêtent une importance immense à mes yeux. Je souligne que sur les 338 députés, il n'y en a que quatre qui se déclarent ouvertement LGBTQ+, ce qui constitue une proportion beaucoup plus faible que dans la population canadienne en général. Même si je ne m'attends pas à ce que tous les députés partagent mes sentiments à l'égard du projet de loi, j'espère que chacun s'interrogera sérieusement sur la signification d'un vote contre ce projet de loi.
Si un député affirme vouloir voter contre pour une question de conscience, je crois qu'il devrait alors faire une introspection et se demander: « pourquoi voudrais-je perpétuer une injustice à l'égard d'un autre être humain, d'un ami, d'un collègue, d'un membre de ma famille, d'un voisin, d'un électeur ou de quiconque en subirait les conséquences, peut-être jusqu'à en mourir? » Pourquoi ne voudrait-il pas se tenir aux côtés des personnes vulnérables, opprimées, ou stigmatisées, bref, des personnes qui ont le plus besoin de son aide?
J'ai entendu ou lu les discours contre ces modifications. J'estime que ces arguments éculés viennent d'une époque que je croyais révolue depuis des décennies. Les politiciens font ce qu'ils peuvent pour que leur rhétorique ne paraisse pas tout droit sorti de l'âge de pierre lorsqu'ils disent qu'ils ne sont pas contre la thérapie de conversion, mais seulement contre ce projet de loi. Ils prétendent que la définition est trop large, qu'il y a des erreurs de formulation dans le projet de loi ou que les dispositions de dérogation pour les organismes religieux, qui les aident à se soustraire aux commandements de Dieu, ne sont pas assez claires ou assez larges.
Je leur réponds par les paroles du prophète Michée: « On t'a fait connaître, ô homme, ce qui est bien; et ce que l'Éternel demande de toi, c'est que tu pratiques la justice, que tu aimes la miséricorde, et que tu marches humblement avec ton Dieu. » Il est temps de dire la vérité dans cette enceinte. Les gens qui s'opposent à ce projet de loi sont contre moi et contre les gens comme moi. Ils disent finalement que nous valons moins qu'eux, que Dieu a fait une erreur lorsqu'il nous a créés et que nous devrions changer ce que nous sommes ou au moins l'envisager.
Je suis ici pour dire que je n'ai pas l'intention de changer et que, puisque c'est Dieu qui nous a fait ainsi, personne ne devrait se faire dire qu'il doit changer ou qu'il le devrait. À la base, les thérapies de conversion partent du principe que c'est mal d'être gai, lesbienne, bisexuel, transgenre, queer ou bispirituel. C'est faux, et il est temps que la Chambre le dise haut et fort en déboulonnant le mythe voulant que les thérapies de conversion puissent avoir du bon dans certains cas et à certains moments.
Qu'il s'agisse de santé, de sécurité, d'emploi, de revenu ou de logement, nous savons déjà pertinemment que les personnes LGBTQ2 du Canada ont toujours été désavantagées socialement et économiquement et qu'elles le sont encore. Les inégalités qui les affligent tirent leur origine de la stigmatisation et de la discrimination systémiques dont elles ont toujours été victimes.
Selon le rapport produit par le Comité permanent de la santé de la Chambre des communes à partir des témoignages et des mémoires d'une série de spécialistes, ces inégalités touchent aussi le domaine de la santé, puisque les personnes LGBTQ2 ont souvent du mal à obtenir des services de santé ou à discuter de leur orientation sexuelle avec leur médecin — et quand elles le peuvent, c'est souvent elles qui doivent leur expliquer la nature exacte de leurs besoins.
Le même rapport souligne les inégalités en matière d'emploi, de revenu et de logement. Il est frappant que de 25 à 40 % des 40 000 jeunes en situation d'itinérance au Canada s'identifient comme appartenant à la communauté LGBTQ2S.
Pas plus tard que cette semaine, le très attendu examen indépendant de la juge à la retraite de la Cour d'appel de l'Ontario, Gloria Epstein, a été publié. Elle y relève de graves lacunes dans les enquêtes du service de police de Toronto, notamment dans l'affaire du tueur en série Bruce McArthur, dont la folie meurtrière de 2010 à 2017 a fauché la vie d'au moins huit hommes homosexuels. La juge Epstein dit que les victimes de M. McArthur étaient marginalisées et vulnérables de diverses façons et que les services de police n'accordaient souvent pas à la disparition de ces personnes l'attention ou la priorité qu'elle mérite. Les victimes de M. McArthur étaient des homosexuels, et bon nombre d'entre eux étaient racialisés ou provenaient de communautés dont les services de police se soucient peu.
Une dure réalité transparaît derrière ces conclusions: le manque d'attention ne se limite pas à de l'incompétence de la part du service de police de Toronto, mais il est profondément ancré dans l'homophobie. Il s'agit d'homophobie systémique. Cette sorte d'homophobie, qui mène à la mort et à l'assassinat de gens, n'est que renforcée lorsque la société permet des choses comme les prétendues thérapies de conversion, qui minent la valeur et la dignité des personnes LGBTQ2S et qui aident ou encouragent les gens souhaitant nous soumettre à de la discrimination, nous faire du mal, nous causer des préjudices ou nous tuer.
Il est vrai qu'à travers tout cela, les communautés LGBTQ2 continuent de faire preuve d'une grande résilience, ingéniosité, innovation et force. Cependant, des croyances et des comportements dangereux sous-tendent et alimentent tout cela. La discrimination, la stigmatisation et le harcèlement sont bien réels. Les croyances préjudiciables à propos de notre communauté et les comportements blessants vis-à-vis d'elle continuent d'exister et doivent être remis en question; il faut y mettre fin. Grâce au bon travail de la ministre de la Diversité et de l'Inclusion et de la Jeunesse et du ministre de la Justice et procureur général du Canada, nous, à la Chambre, avons la possibilité de faire exactement cela en appuyant ce projet de loi.
Ce ne sont pas les personnes et les communautés LGBTQ2 qui ont besoin d'être changées ou converties. Ce sont les préjugés néfastes, l'homophobie, la transphobie et toutes les formes de discrimination qui doivent faire place à la justice, à la compassion, à la compréhension et au respect et finalement, à l'amour. C'est ce que nous pourrons réaliser collectivement si nous appuyons ce projet de loi et le faisons adopter afin de bâtir un meilleur Canada pour tous.
Les orientations sexuelles, les identités de genre et d'expressions de genre sont diverses et variées et il n'y a rien là d'effrayant. Nous devons tous arriver à comprendre, en tant que société, que l'orientation sexuelle, l'identité de genre et l'expression de genre de chaque personne font intrinsèquement partie de qui nous sommes. Nous devons les accepter en nous et chez les autres, même si nous ne les comprenons pas totalement.
C'est pourquoi ce projet de loi est si important. La thérapie de conversion se base sur des hypothèses improbables et des croyances néfastes. En mettant fin à la pratique néfaste de la thérapie de conversion, non seulement nous y mettons fin, donc, et protégeons la vie des communautés et des personnes LGBTQ2, mais nous envoyons aussi un message important, à savoir que notre identité de genre, notre expression de genre et notre orientation sexuelle sont des éléments essentiels de notre identité qui ne sont pas sujets à débat. Il nous faut les comprendre, les apprécier et les célébrer. C'est comme cela que nous aurons une société véritablement inclusive et solidaire.
De toute évidence, je ne suis pas né d'hier, comme mon air fatigué en témoigne. Cela veut dire que j'ai été en mesure de constater par moi-même les avancées incroyables dans les attitudes envers les personnes comme moi. Au moment même où je commençais à comprendre mon orientation sexuelle, le regretté premier ministre Pierre Trudeau nous a assuré que je ne serais pas traité comme un criminel si je choisissais de vivre ma sexualité et d'aimer un autre homme. J'ai connu l'émergence des mesures législatives sur les droits de la personne et les décisions des tribunaux fondées sur la Charte, qui m'ont permis d'épouser mon partenaire, avec qui j'ai passé presque 30 ans. J'ai vu le gouvernement présenter des excuses à ceux qui ont été malmenés par l'homophobie systémique dans la fonction publique, dans l'armée et dans la police nationale.
J'assisterai à distance aux travaux de la Chambre lorsque nous passerons à la prochaine étape de l'interdiction des thérapies de conversion. Il y a loin de la coupe aux lèvres. Les vieilles attitudes ont la vie dure, mais l'occasion se présente à nous...
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
We have to go to questions and comments. The hon. member for Cloverdale—Langley City.
Nous devons passer aux questions et observations. La députée de Cloverdale—Langley City a la parole.
Results: 1 - 15 of 25633 | Page: 1 of 1709

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data