Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 1 of 1
Guy Bujold
View Guy Bujold Profile
Guy Bujold
2018-02-15 12:05
Thank you.
Mr. Chair, honourable members, thank you for inviting me here today to speak to you about Bill C-59, An Act respecting national security matters. As you said, Mr. McKay, I am accompanied by Ms. Joanne Gibb, Director of the Research, Policy and Strategic Investigations Unit of the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
I will focus my comments today on part 1 of the bill, which seeks to establish the national security and intelligence review agency, thereby transferring certain powers, duties, and functions from the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP to this new agency.
As the head of the commission, I strongly believe in the importance of civilian oversight and review, whether it is related to national security or, for that matter, related to law enforcement more generally. Independent review fosters positive change and makes organizations better, and I think that's an objective we shouldn't lose sight of when we're talking about these changes. Consequently, the commission supports all of the efforts to enhance the national security review framework.
The trust that Canadians have in their public safety and national security agencies is predicated on accountability and transparency, to the degree possible. Independent review, whether it is by the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, or by expert civilian bodies such as the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission, the Security Intelligence Review Committee, or the Office of the CSE Commissioner, contributes to the overall accountability framework of the organizations entrusted with keeping Canada safe and secure.
As the government seeks to further strengthen that framework by creating the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency, the commission welcomes the opportunity to work collaboratively with the new review body to ensure that RCMP activities are independently examined.
Created in 1988, the commission has significant experience and expertise in managing complaints and conducting reviews of the RCMP, whether it is into the RCMP’s actions in relation to the G8 or G20 summits, the RCMP seizure of firearms in High River, or policing in northern B.C., to name a few subjects.
The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP, as it is known now, has long been a key element of the RCMP’s accountability structure. By independently reviewing complaints, and where necessary making findings and remedial recommendations, the commission strives to bring about constructive change in the RCMP.
Currently, the commission is undertaking a review of the RCMP's implementation of Justice O'Connor's recommendations in relation to the Maher Arar affair. That investigation is ongoing at this time and is expected to be completed before the end of the fiscal year. The commission will then prepare a report outlining any findings and recommendations pertaining to the six sectors examined by Justice O'Connor.
It is my hope that any findings or recommendations made by the commission would guide the new review agency in its future work in relation to the RCMP's national security activities.
In his 2006 report, Justice O’Connor stressed the importance of a review body being able to “follow the thread”. Through Bill C-59, the new national security and intelligence review agency will have the mandate to do just that, providing a more holistic approach to national security review. Justice O’Connor also stressed the need to eliminate silos and for expert review bodies to work more collaboratively. We're hopeful that this will be an outcome of the new legislation and new oversight structures.
Since the mandate of the RCMP is much broader than just national security, I am pleased that Bill C-59 permits the national security and intelligence review agency to provide the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission with information it has obtained from the RCMP if such information relates to the fulfilment of our own mandate. I believe that this is critical to the overall effectiveness of the expert review bodies.
For example, if in the course of a national security review the national security and intelligence review agency becomes aware of a policy issue unrelated to national security, that issue could be flagged to the CRCC for further examination. This is the reality of the world we're living in.
To further illustrate the importance of collaboration and co-operation, I would suggest that if a public complaint was received by the commission that pertained to national security, but also contained allegations related to RCMP member conduct, the two review bodies should be able to collaborate, within their respective statutory mandates, to deal with the complaint. That is the only way that the Canadians who had made a complaint would receive an appropriate response to all their complaints.
Although the legislation requires the complaint to be referred to the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency, the CRCC, as the expert review body in relation to policing and police conduct, could deal with the allegation related to member conduct. This would ensure a consistent approach in reviewing complaints of RCMP on-duty conduct.
In terms of changes to the commission's mandate relative to Bill C-59, certain elements in the legislation might benefit from further clarification, and that the members of this committee may wish to consider further. Proposed amendments to the RCMP Act require that the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission refuse to deal with a complaint concerning an activity that is closely related to national security and refer any such complaint to the national security and intelligence review agency. That means the CRCC will continue to receive all public complaints related to the RCMP, and thus will remain the point of intake for public complaints. The onus will then be on the CRCC to determine whether the complaint is, in the words of the legislation, “closely related to national security” before deciding on how it will dispose of it.
Absent a definition of national security, however, the commission must make a determination on whether to refer the complaint to the national security and intelligence review agency. Once referred to the national security and intelligence review agency, that agency must receive and investigate the complaint in accordance with section 19 of the new legislation. There is currently no authority, however, for a referral back to the CRCC if the national security and intelligence review agency were to deem, after it had examined a complaint, that it was not a matter closely related to national security. This is a matter that the committee may want to consider further.
Also, while Bill C-59 prohibits the commission from dealing with or investigating complaints closely related to national security, as well as RCMP activity related to national security, there is no prohibition on the commission's chairperson from initiating a complaint related to national security. Further to the RCMP Act, if the chairperson is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds to investigate the conduct of an RCMP member in the performance of any duty or function, the chairperson may initiate a complaint in relation to that conduct. Bill C-59 does not amend subsection 45.59(1) of the RCMP Act and, as a result, the chairperson could initiate a complaint closely related to national security. I respectfully suggest that the committee may wish to consider whether this is consistent with the intent of the legislation.
As I indicated at the beginning of my remarks, I believe in the importance of civilian oversight of law enforcement, and we at the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP are fully committed to working with the new national security and intelligence review agency.
In closing, I'd like to thank the committee for allowing me to share my views on the important role of the independent civilian review. I welcome your questions.
Je vous remercie.
Monsieur le président, honorables membres du Comité, je vous remercie de m'avoir invité ici aujourd'hui à vous parler du projet de loi C-59, Loi concernant des questions de sécurité nationale. Comme vous l'avez précisé, monsieur McKay, je suis accompagné de Mme Joanne Gibb, qui est la directrice de la Recherche des politiques et des enquêtes stratégiques à la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale du Canada.
Mes commentaires porteront sur la partie 1 du projet de loi, qui vise à mettre sur pied l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, organisme auquel certains pouvoirs et fonctions de la Commission civile d’examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC seront transférés.
À titre de dirigeant de la Commission, je crois fermement en l’importance de la surveillance et de l’examen par des civils, qu’elle porte sur la sécurité nationale ou, plus précisément, sur des questions générales d’exécution de la loi. L’examen indépendant favorise le changement positif et améliore les organisations, et je crois qu’il s’agit d’un objectif que nous ne devons pas perdre de vue lorsque nous parlons de ces modifications. Par conséquent, la Commission appuie les efforts déployés en vue d’améliorer le cadre d’examen en matière de sécurité nationale.
La confiance des Canadiens et des Canadiennes à l'endroit des organismes responsables de la sécurité publique et de la sécurité nationale est fondée en grande partie sur la responsabilisation et la transparence, dans la mesure où cette transparence est possible. Qu'il soit effectué par le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement ou par des organismes civils d'experts, notamment la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, le Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité ou le Bureau du commissaire du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, l'examen indépendant complète le cadre de responsabilisation général des organisations chargées de veiller à la sécurité du Canada.
Le gouvernement veut renforcer ce cadre en créant l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. La Commission s'engage donc à collaborer avec le nouvel organisme d'examen pour faire en sorte que les activités de la GRC puissent faire l'objet d'un examen indépendant approprié.
Créée en 1988, la Commission possède une expérience et une expertise considérables en ce qui concerne la gestion de plaintes et l’exécution d’examens concernant diverses activités de la GRC, notamment les activités de la GRC en lien avec les sommets du G8 et du G20, la saisie d’armes à feu à High River ou la prestation de services de police dans le Nord de la Colombie-Britannique.
La Commission civile d’examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC, telle qu’elle est appelée aujourd’hui, constitue depuis longtemps un élément clé de la structure de responsabilisation de la GRC. En examinant les plaintes de manière indépendante et en formulant des recommandations correctives au besoin, la Commission vise à apporter des changements constructifs au sein de la GRC.
À l'heure actuelle, la Commission effectue un examen de la mise en oeuvre par la GRC des recommandations du juge O'Connor concernant l'affaire Maher Arar. Cette enquête est en cours et devrait être terminée avant la fin de l'année financière. La Commission rédigera alors un rapport exposant les conclusions et les recommandations, s'il y a lieu, relatives aux six secteurs étudiés par le juge O'Connor.
J'espère bien que les conclusions ou les recommandations formulées par la Commission aideront à orienter le nouvel office d'examen dans ses travaux sur les activités de la GRC touchant la sécurité nationale.
Dans son rapport de 2006, le juge O’Connor a souligné qu’il est important que le nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement soit en mesure de « suivre le fil ». Conformément au projet de loi C-59, c’est exactement le mandat qu’aura le nouvel organisme d’examen : il fournira une approche plus globale aux examens en matière de sécurité nationale. Le juge O’Connor a aussi précisé qu’il faut briser les cloisonnements et que les organismes d’examen spécialisés doivent collaborer davantage. Nous espérons que cela sera un résultat de la nouvelle loi et des nouvelles structures de surveillance.
Puisque la sécurité nationale ne constitue qu’une infime partie du mandat de la GRC, je suis heureux que le projet de loi C-59 permette à l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement de fournir à la Commission des renseignements qu’il a obtenus de la GRC si ces renseignements concernent notre propre mandat. Je crois que ces éléments sont essentiels à l’efficacité globale des organismes d’examen spécialisés.
Par exemple, si, dans le cadre d’un examen touchant la sécurité nationale, l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement est informé d’une question stratégique qui n’est pas liée à la sécurité nationale, cette question pourrait être renvoyée à la Commission en vue d’un examen plus approfondi. C’est la réalité du monde dans lequel nous vivons.
Pour mieux illustrer l'importance de la collaboration et de la coopération, je pense que, si la Commission reçoit une plainte du public qui touche la sécurité nationale et que celle-ci contient aussi des allégations relatives à la conduite d'un membre de la GRC, les deux organismes d'examen devraient pouvoir, tout en respectant le mandat législatif de chacun, unir leurs efforts pour traiter cette plainte. C'est de cette seule façon que les Canadiens ou les Canadiennes qui auraient formulé une plainte recevraient une réponse adéquate à toutes leurs plaintes.
Même si la loi précise que la plainte doit être envoyée à l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, la Commission, en tant qu'organisme d'examen spécialisé en ce qui concerne les activités policières et la conduite des agents, pourrait s'occuper des éléments d'une allégation visant la conduite d'un membre ou des membres. Cela fournirait une approche cohérente et uniformisée de l'examen de plaintes relatives à la conduite des membres de la GRC dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions.
En ce qui concerne les changements apportés au mandat de la Commission dans le projet de loi C-59, certaines ambiguïtés doivent être clarifiées. Le Comité voudra peut-être les prendre en considération. Selon les modifications proposées à la Loi sur la GRC, la Commission doit refuser de traiter une plainte qui concerne une activité étroitement liée à la sécurité nationale et la renvoyer à l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Cela signifie que la Commission continuera d’accueillir toutes les plaintes du public liées à la GRC et, par conséquent, elle demeurera le point d’arrivée de ces plaintes. C’est à elle qu’il incombe de déterminer si la plainte, selon le libellé de la loi, est « étroitement liée à la sécurité nationale » avant de décider la façon de la trancher.
En l’absence d’une définition de « sécurité nationale », toutefois, la Commission doit décider si elle renvoie ou non la plainte à l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Si ce renvoi est effectué, l’Office doit recevoir la plainte et faire enquête conformément à l’article 19 de la nouvelle loi. Il n’existe aucun pouvoir à l’heure actuelle, cependant, permettant au nouvel Office de renvoyer le dossier à la Commission s’il estime, après l’avoir examiné, que la plainte n’est pas étroitement liée à la sécurité nationale. Il s’agit d’une modification que le Comité pourrait envisager d’apporter.
Par ailleurs, aux termes du projet de loi C-59, bien que la Commission ne puisse pas recevoir de plaintes ou enquêter sur les plaintes qui sont étroitement liées à la sécurité nationale ni examiner une activité de la GRC liée à la sécurité nationale, rien n'interdit au président de la Commission de déposer une plainte concernant la sécurité nationale. Actuellement, en vertu de la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, le président peut déposer une plainte s'il est convaincu qu'il existe des motifs raisonnables d'enquêter sur la conduite, dans l'exercice de ses fonctions, d'un membre de la GRC. Conséquemment, puisque le projet de loi C-59 ne modifie pas le paragraphe 45.59(1) de la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, le président pourrait déposer une plainte étroitement liée à la sécurité nationale. Je propose, avec le respect que je dois au Comité, qu'il se penche sur cette question pour déterminer si cela est conforme aux objectifs visés par la nouvelle loi.
Comme je l'ai mentionné au début de ma déclaration liminaire, je crois en l'importance de la surveillance civile de l'application de la loi, et, à la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC, nous sommes fermement résolus à travailler avec le nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement.
Pour terminer, j'aimerais remercier le Comité de m'avoir permis d'exprimer mon opinion sur le rôle important de l'examen civil indépendant. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.
Result: 1 - 1 of 1

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data