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View Ed Fast Profile
CPC (BC)
View Ed Fast Profile
2020-02-05 17:24
That's right. But for a state to engage on that typically requires something more than just a company being aggrieved. I think states are reluctant to take up one company's case. That certainly was my experience when I was in the trade role. I'm just surprised that suddenly we've said, well, you know what, we had ISDS there and we felt it was important back when we negotiated the original Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement that morphed into NAFTA. Chapter 11 stayed there and suddenly, Canada is of a different mind, that we suddenly trust Donald Trump and the court system in the United States. Do you understand my difficulty?
Let me follow up with another question. It has already been mentioned that we have an obligation to present any trade agreement with a non-market economy to the United States and Mexico if we want to sign one. Basically we'd be going cap in hand to the United States, to Donald Trump, and saying please may we sign a trade agreement with China.
The United States has an obligation going the other way, except they've already signed a managed trade agreement with China—at least phase one of it. So they no longer have to come to us cap in hand to ask us to review that agreement and ask for permission. I find that disturbing simply because I'm not aware of any other trade agreement that Canada has signed where we've agreed to those kinds of provisions, where we actually cede our sovereignty to two other countries to determine whether we can negotiate a free trade agreement with a country like China.
Doesn't that concern you?
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