Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 60 of 12328
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 10:05 [p.2605]
Expand
There are three motions in amendment standing on the Notice Paper for the report stage of Bill C-7.
The Chair has received letters sent by the hon. member for Fundy Royal and the hon. member for St. Albert—Edmonton, arguing that Motions No. 2 and 3, though previously defeated in committee, should be selected at report stage as they are of such exceptional significance as to warrant further consideration, in accordance with the note to Standing Order 76.1(5).
Motion No. 2 seeks to maintain the provisions of paragraph 241.2(3)(g) of the Criminal Code to ensure that there are at least 10 clear days between the day on which the request was signed by or on behalf of the person and the day on which the medical assistance in dying is provided in cases where natural death has become reasonably foreseeable.
Motion No. 3 seeks to increase from 90 to 120 the minimum number of days required between the first assessment of a person who seeks medical assistance in dying and the day on which medical assistance in dying is provided, this in the circumstance where natural death is not reasonably foreseeable.
The Chair appreciates the argument put forward by the members as to why they consider these amendments dealing with procedural safeguards to be of such significance as to warrant further consideration at report stage. As with the original medical assistance in dying legislation four years ago, I recognize that this is an important issue with profound legal, moral and constitutional dimensions and that members have strongly held and varied points of view on these matters.
For these reasons, the Chair is prepared on this occasion to give members the benefit of the doubt and to select Motions 2 and 3, even though they were previously defeated in committee.
The remaining motion, Motion No. 1, was also examined and the Chair is satisfied that it meets the guidelines expressed in the note to Standing Order 76.1(5) regarding the selection of motions in amendment at report stage.
Trois motions d'amendement figurent au Feuilleton des avis pour l'étude à l'étape du rapport du projet de loi C-7.
Les députés de Fundy Royal et de St. Albert—Edmonton ont écrit à la présidence pour faire valoir que, conformément au paragraphe 76.1(5) du Règlement, les motions nos 2 et 3 rejetées lors de l'étude en comité devraient être choisies à l'étape du rapport pour un nouvel examen compte tenu de leur importance exceptionnelle.
La motion no 2 vise à maintenir les dispositions de l'article 241.2(3)g) du Code criminel pour s'assurer qu'au moins 10 jours francs se sont écoulés entre le jour où la demande a été signée par la personne ou en son nom et celui où l'aide médicale à mourir est fournie, dans le cas où la mort naturelle est raisonnablement prévisible.
Selon la motion no 3, le délai d'attente minimal entre le jour où est faite la première évaluation et celui où l'aide médicale à mourir est fournie passerait de 90 à 120 jours. Cela s'appliquerait lorsque la mort naturelle n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible.
La présidence comprend la position des députés, selon laquelle les amendements sur les mesures de sauvegarde sont d'une importance si cruciale qu'elles devraient être choisies à l'étape du rapport pour un nouvel examen. À l'instar de la loi initiale sur l'aide médicale à mourir présentée il y a quatre ans, la mesure législative d'aujourd'hui touche un enjeu vital qui a de profondes répercussions sur les plans juridique, moral et constitutionnel. Les députés ont farouchement défendu leurs points de vue respectifs sur ces questions.
Pour ces raisons, la présidence est disposée, en l'occurrence, à accorder aux députés le bénéfice du doute et à choisir les motions nos 2 et 3, même si elles ont été rejetées par le comité.
La motion restante, portant le no 1, a également été examinée et la présidence est d'avis qu'elle respecte les critères énoncés dans le nota du paragraphe 76.1(5) du Règlement quant au choix des motions d'amendement à l'étape du rapport.
Collapse
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
View Garnett Genuis Profile
2020-11-27 10:07 [p.2605]
Expand
Madam Chair, in light of the selection of the motions from my colleagues, I would like to withdraw my motion.
Madame la présidente, puisque les motions proposées par mes collègues ont été retenues, je souhaite retirer la mienne.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 10:07 [p.2605]
Expand
Accordingly, Motion No. 1 will not be proceeded with.
Motions No. 2 and 3 will be grouped for debate and voted upon according to the voting pattern available at the table.
I will now put these motions to the House.
Par conséquent, la motion no 1 n'est pas retenue.
Les motions nos 2 et 3 seront groupées pour les fins du débat et mises aux voix selon les modalités que l'on peut consulter au Bureau.
Je vais maintenant soumettre ces motions à la Chambre.
Collapse
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michael Cooper Profile
2020-11-27 10:08 [p.2605]
Expand
moved:
Motion No. 2
That Bill C-7, in Clause 1, be amended by deleting lines 25 to 31 on page 3.
Motion No. 3
That Bill C-7, in Clause 1, be amended by replacing line 8 on page 5 with the following:
“(i) ensure that there are at least 120 clear days between”.
propose:
Motion no 2
Que le projet de loi C-7, à l'article 1, soit modifié par suppression des lignes 22 à 28, page 3.
Motion no 3
Que le projet de loi C-7, à l'article 1, soit modifié par substitution, à la ligne 6, page 5, de ce qui suit:
« i) s’assurer qu’au moins cent vingt jours francs ».
Collapse
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
He said: Madam Speaker, I am pleased to rise to speak at report stage of Bill C-7 and, in particular, with respect to the two very modest amendments that we in the official opposition have put forward to the legislation, namely, to maintain a 10-day reflection period and to extend the reflection period of 90 days to 100 days where death is not reasonably foreseeable. Both of these amendments are supported by the evidence that was heard at the justice committee in what was otherwise a very rushed process. It need not have been this way and it should not have been this way.
One year ago, the Attorney General should have done what we on this side of the House called on the Attorney General to do, and that was to appeal the Truchon decision. That would have provided clarity in the law and it would have provided Parliament with time to appropriately respond legislatively if necessary, but the Attorney General did not do that. Instead, he rushed ahead with legislation purportedly aimed at responding to the Truchon decision, legislation, I might add, that was introduced with very little consultation.
The legislation went well beyond responding to the Truchon decision. The legislation fundamentally changes the medical assistance in dying regime that was passed in this Parliament a mere four and a half years ago and in so doing, the Attorney General and the government pre-empted a legislative review that was mandated by Bill C-14.
As a result, what we have is a rushed process to deal with a shoddy piece of legislation that recklessly puts vulnerable Canadians at risk. It is why virtually every disability rights organization in Canada opposes this bill. Indeed, 72 national disability rights organizations wrote to the Attorney General and pleaded with him to appeal the Truchon decision. Those pleas fell on deaf ears.
More than 1,000 physicians have penned a letter to the Attorney General opposing this bill. The UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities expressed concern about Canada's medical assistance in dying regime and questioned whether Canada in fact was living up to its international obligations under the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
I will quote Krista Carr, the executive vice-president of Inclusion Canada, an organization that represents the rights of persons with disabilities, who said this of Bill C-7, “Bill C-7 is our worst nightmare.”
Catherine Frazee, professor at Ryerson University, former chief commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission and a leading advocate for the rights of persons with disabilities, said “our equality is, right now, on the line” with respect to Bill C-7. She noted that the careful balance between individual autonomy and equality carved out in Bill C-14 had been up-ended in Bill C-7.
Dr. Heidi Janz of the Council of Canadians with Disabilities said:
Bill C-7 would enshrine a legal form of ableism into Canadian law by making medical assistance in dying a legally sanctioned substitute for the provision of community-based supports to assist people with disabilities to live.
You must ensure that MAID does not weaponize systemic ableism in Canada.
In the face of those concerns right across the spectrum from physicians and experts to persons with disabilities and their advocates, we, on this side, thought it appropriate we proceed in a cautious and deliberate way, having regard for the complexity of the issue, the lack of consultation and the very short time frame before us to consider the radical changes brought forward by the government in Bill C-7.
Therefore, at the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights we put forward reasonable amendments, including maintaining a 10-day reflection period, having regard for the fact that people do change their minds and having regard for the feedback that was provided.
We put forward an amendment to ensure there be two independent witnesses. When one executes a will, one needs two witnesses. One would expect that at the very least there would be a safeguard at least as robust as in the case of executing a will when we are talking about ending one's life, but no, the government removed that safeguard.
We put forward an amendment to extend the reflection period where death is not reasonably foreseeable from 90 days to 120 days, having regard for the fact it is often not even possible to access palliative care or other supports within 90 days. What good is a reflection period of 90 days if one does not have access to alternatives within such a time frame? That amendment was rejected by the government.
Consistent with what the Minister of Disability Inclusion said, and having regard for the horrific evidence we heard of Roger Foley, who was coerced into making a request for medical assistance in dying, which he recorded, this should always be patient-initiated so coercion is limited and to guard against that.
In closing, let me just say that what we have is a piece of legislation that does the opposite of what the Supreme Court called on Parliament to do in Carter, namely to provide for a carefully designed and monitored system of safeguards. This legislation eviscerates those safeguards, and on that basis, is unsupportable. It needs to be defeated out of hand.
— Madame la Présidente, c'est un plaisir pour moi de pouvoir parler du projet de loi C-7 à l'étape du rapport, et plus particulièrement des deux très modestes amendements que propose l'opposition officielle. Ces deux amendements, qui auraient pour but de maintenir la période de réflexion de 10 jours et de faire passer de 90 à 100 jours la période de réflexion pour les cas où la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible, sont l'écho des témoignages entendus au comité de la justice, même si force est d'avouer que l'étude s'est faite de manière très précipitée. Les choses auraient très bien pu — et dû — se passer autrement.
L'année dernière, le procureur général aurait dû faire ce que l'opposition lui demandait de faire et interjeter appel de la décision Truchon. La loi n'en aurait été que plus claire, et si le Parlement s'était trouvé dans l'obligation de légiférer, il aurait eu le temps de le faire sans se presser. Ce n'est hélas pas ce que le procureur général a décidé de faire. Il s'est plutôt empressé de présenter un projet de loi censé donner suite au jugement Truchon — lequel projet de loi, disons-le, n'a été précédé d'à peu près aucune consultation.
La mesure législative ne se contente pas de donner suite à l'arrêt Truchon, loin s'en faut. Elle modifie fondamentalement le régime d'aide médicale à mourir adopté au Parlement il y a à peine quatre ans et demi, et, ce faisant, le procureur général et le gouvernement ont empêché l'examen législatif prévu par le projet de loi C-14.
En conséquence, nous devons examiner de façon précipitée une mesure législative bâclée qui, de façon inconsidérée, met en danger les Canadiens vulnérables. C'est pourquoi pratiquement tous les organismes de défense des droits des personnes handicapées au Canada s'opposent au projet de loi. En effet, 72 organismes nationaux de défense des droits des personnes handicapées ont écrit au procureur général pour l'exhorter à faire appel de l'arrêt Truchon. Leurs demandes sont restées lettre morte.
Plus de 1 000 médecins ont fait parvenir une lettre au procureur général pour lui signifier leur opposition au projet de loi. Le rapporteur spécial des Nations unies sur les droits des personnes handicapées a exprimé des inquiétudes au sujet du régime canadien d'aide médicale à mourir et il s'est demandé si le Canada respectait vraiment ses obligations internationales au titre de la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées.
Je vais citer Krista Carr, vice-présidente à la direction d'Inclusion Canada, un organisme de défense des droits des personnes handicapées, qui a déclaré ceci au sujet du projet de loi C-7: « Le projet de loi C-7 est notre pire cauchemar. »
Catherine Frazee, professeure à l'Université Ryerson, ancienne commissaire en chef de la Commission ontarienne des droits de la personne et ardente défenseure des droits des personnes handicapées, a déclaré que leur droit à l'égalité était maintenant en jeu avec le projet de loi C-7. Elle fait remarquer que l'équilibre délicat entre l'autonomie individuelle et l'égalité, dont il est question dans le projet de loi C-14, a été bouleversé par le projet de loi C-7.
La Dre Heidi Janz du Conseil des Canadiens avec déficiences a déclaré:
Le projet de loi C-7 inscrirait dans la loi canadienne une forme légale de capacitisme en faisant de l'aide médicale à mourir un substitut légalement sanctionné à la prestation de services de soutien communautaire pour aider les personnes handicapées à vivre.
Vous devez vous assurer que l'aide médicale à mourir ne transforme pas le capacitisme systémique en arme au Canada.
À la lumière de ces préoccupations exprimées par des médecins, des experts, des personnes handicapées et leurs défenseurs, nous avons pensé, de ce côté de la Chambre, qu'il serait approprié de procéder de façon prudente et réfléchie, en tenant compte de la complexité de la question, du manque de consultation et du peu de temps qui nous est alloué pour soupeser les changements radicaux proposés par le gouvernement dans le cadre du projet de loi C-7.
Par conséquent, au Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne, nous avons proposé des amendements raisonnables, visant notamment à maintenir en place la période de réflexion de 10 jours, de manière à tenir compte du fait qu'il arrive que les gens changent d'idée ainsi que de la rétroaction fournie.
Nous avons proposé un amendement visant à exiger la présence de deux témoins indépendants. Lorsqu'une personne exécute un testament, il lui faut deux témoins. On s'attendrait à ce qu'il existe une mesure de sauvegarde à tout le moins aussi robuste lorsqu'il est question de mettre un terme à la vie d'une personne, mais non, le gouvernement a éliminé cette mesure de sauvegarde.
Nous avons proposé un amendement visant à porter de 90 à 120 jours la période de réflexion lorsque la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible, de manière à tenir compte du fait qu'il n'est souvent même pas possible d'accéder à des soins palliatifs ou à d'autres formes de soutien en l'espace de 90 jours. Que vaut une période de réflexion de 90 jours si la personne concernée ne dispose pas de solutions de rechange dans ce délai? Le gouvernement a rejeté l'amendement.
Conformément à ce qu'a dit la ministre de l'Inclusion des personnes handicapées et à la lumière de l'horrible témoignage que nous avons entendu de Roger Foley, que l'on a forcé à présenter une demande d'aide médicale à mourir et qui a enregistré cette conversation, la démarche devrait toujours venir d'abord du patient de manière à limiter la coercition et à en protéger les patients.
En terminant, je dirai que le projet de loi fait l'opposé de ce que la Cour suprême a demandé au Parlement de faire dans l'arrêt Carter. Plutôt que de prévoir un régime de mesures de sauvegarde conçu avec soin et étroitement surveillé, le projet de loi affaiblit les mesures de sauvegarde. Pour cette raison, je ne peux l'appuyer. Le projet de loi doit carrément être rejeté.
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-11-27 10:18 [p.2606]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I have a couple points of clarification. I thank the member opposite for his contributions.
The 90-day period that is entrenched in the legislation is an assessment period, not a reflection period. I believe the member misspoke. The notion that little consultation has been done on this bill is patently incorrect. We consulted 125 experts and 300,000 people submitted questionnaires.
The point has been made about the Truchon decision. What I would say, on this side of the House, is that the Truchon decision informed the response that is before Parliament right now. It talks about the autonomy of the individual.
What we know about the 10-day reflection period, part of the motion that is being debated right now, is that the 10-day reflection period for people who have made a considered decision only prolongs suffering. We know the evidence shows that people were depriving themselves of pain sedative medication just so they could hold on to provide that final consent.
Is prolonging that type of suffering what the member opposite wants to see in terms of the medical assistance in dying regime in Canada?
Madame la Présidente, je souhaite apporter quelques précisions. Je remercie le député d'en face pour sa contribution aux débats.
La période de 90 jours prévue dans la loi est une période d'évaluation et non de réflexion. Je crois que le député s'est mal exprimé. Quant à l'idée que ce projet de loi n'a bénéficié que de consultations très limitées, elle est carrément incorrecte. Dans les faits, nous avons consulté 125 experts, et 300 000 personnes ont rempli un questionnaire.
On a déjà parlé de la décision Truchon. Cette décision a guidé la réponse du gouvernement libéral dont le Parlement est actuellement saisi. Elle est fondée sur l'autonomie des personnes.
Pour ce qui est de la période de réflexion de 10 jours, qui figure dans la motion dont nous débattons actuellement, nous savons qu'elle ne fait que prolonger la souffrance des personnes qui ont déjà pris une décision bien réfléchie. Des preuves probantes révèlent que certaines personnes ont choisi de ne pas prendre de médicaments contre la douleur parce qu'elles tenaient à avoir la capacité de fournir le consentement final.
Le député souhaite-t-il que ce type de souffrance soit associé au régime canadien d'aide médicale à mourir?
Collapse
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michael Cooper Profile
2020-11-27 10:19 [p.2607]
Expand
Madam Speaker, with respect to the consultation period, the consultation that was undertaken by the government provided for an online survey that left out people who do not have access to the Internet, left out people with cognitive, mobility or other impairments, and left out people living in remote and northern communities. We heard evidence before the committee that the so-called consultations were an effort to arrive at a predetermined outcome. I would not stand in any way defending that shoddy process, which led to this shoddy piece of legislation.
With respect to the matter of the 10-day reflection period, I would note that Dr. Harvey Chochinov, who was chair of the expert panel on a legislative response to the Carter decision, noted that death wishes can be transient and, indeed, data before the Quebec court in Truchon indicated that 8% of persons who made a request for medical assistance in dying removed that request, underscoring the need for a reflection period.
Madame la Présidente, concernant la période de consultation, celle entreprise par le gouvernement a pris la forme d'un sondage en ligne auquel n'ont pas pu répondre les personnes qui n'ont pas accès à Internet, qui souffrent de handicaps cognitifs, moteurs ou autres ainsi que celles qui vivent dans des communautés isolées du Nord. Certains témoins ont affirmé au comité que les prétendues consultations visaient à atteindre un objectif prédéterminé. Je ne vais certainement pas défendre ce processus bâclé, qui a mené à cette mesure législative bâclée.
Quant à la période de réflexion de 10 jours, le Dr Harvey Chochinov, qui présidait le groupe d'experts réfléchissant aux mesures législatives à prendre en réponse à l'arrêt Carter, a fait observer que le désir de mourir peut être transitoire comme le confirment les données présentées à la cour québécoise dans l'affaire Truchon selon lesquelles 8 % des personnes ayant fait une demande d'aide médicale à mourir l'avaient ensuite retirée. Voilà qui souligne la nécessité d'une période de réflexion.
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2020-11-27 10:21 [p.2607]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for his speech.
He mentioned that he would have liked to see the government appeal Justice Baudouin's decision. Usually, when a decision is appealed, it is because an error of fact or law was made.
Can he tell me what errors of fact or law Justice Baudouin may have made in her decision?
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de son discours.
Il a mentionné qu'il aurait souhaité que le gouvernement appelle de la décision de la juge Baudouin. Généralement, quand on appelle d'une décision, c'est que l’on constate qu'il y a des erreurs de fait ou de droit.
Est-il capable de me donner une piste quant à quelques erreurs de fait ou de droit que la juge Baudouin aurait commises dans sa décision?
Collapse
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michael Cooper Profile
2020-11-27 10:21 [p.2607]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would note that Madam Justice Baudouin, in rendering her decision and finding that the reasonably foreseeable criteria contravened section 7 and section 15 of the charter, based her analysis on only one objective of Bill C-14, namely to protect vulnerable persons from being induced in a moment of weakness to ending their lives.
The justice ignored other objectives of law, including the sanctity of life, dignity of the elderly and disabled, and suicide prevention. On that basis alone, the decision should have been appealed.
Madame la Présidente, j'aimerais faire remarquer que la juge Baudouin, en rendant sa décision et en concluant que le critère de la mort raisonnablement prévisible contrevenait aux articles 7 et 15 de la Charte, ne s'est basée, pour ce faire, que sur un objectif du projet de loi C-14, à savoir empêcher que les personnes vulnérables soient incitées à se suicider dans un moment de faiblesse.
La juge a ignoré d'autres objectifs législatifs, comme le caractère sacré de la vie, la dignité des personnes âgées et handicapées et la prévention du suicide. Ne serait-ce que pour cela, la décision aurait dû faire l'objet d'un appel.
Collapse
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2020-11-27 10:22 [p.2607]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I will disagree that this legislation is shoddy. I think this piece of legislation is well crafted. There were some amendments that my hon. colleague from Nanaimo—Ladysmith would have liked to see pass in committee, which I supported, which would have done more to reassure the disability community. One of the amendments did go through.
It is similar to what my friend from the Bloc just said. It does not strike me that making the case that this matter should have been appealed deals with the immediate need that the first version of this bill did not meet the Carter decision requirements. I said it at that time in the House that we did not do what needed to be done to meet the Carter decision from the Supreme Court of Canada.
Does my colleague think it would have made any difference to appeal Truchon, only to have it reconfirmed when it got to the Supreme Court of Canada?
Madame la Présidente, je ne suis pas d'accord pour dire que le projet de loi est bâclé. Je pense qu'il est bien rédigé. Il y a eu des amendements que mon collègue de Nanaimo—Ladysmith aurait aimé qu'on adopte en comité et que j'ai moi-même appuyés. Ils auraient servi à rassurer davantage la communauté des personnes handicapées. Un de ces amendements a été adopté.
Je suis plutôt d'accord avec ce que ma collègue du Bloc vient de dire. Il me semble que faire valoir que cette décision aurait dû faire l'objet d'un appel ne traite pas du fait que la première mouture de ce projet de loi ne respectait pas les exigences de l'arrêt Carter. À l'époque, j'avais dit à la Chambre que nous n'avions pas fait le nécessaire pour répondre aux exigences de l'arrêt Carter de la Cour suprême du Canada.
Le député croit-il que cela aurait fait une différence si l'on avait décidé de faire appel de la décision Truchon, uniquement pour la voir réaffirmée par la Cour suprême du Canada?
Collapse
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michael Cooper Profile
2020-11-27 10:23 [p.2607]
Expand
Madam Speaker, let me just say that I believe, at the very least, it would have provided time for Parliament to respond legislatively, something that we have not had sufficient time to do, and it would have better provided clarity of the law.
Madame la Présidente, je dirai simplement que, au tout le moins, cela aurait donné au Parlement le temps d'agir sur le plan législatif, ce qu'il n'a pas eu le temps de faire. Cela aurait permis d'avoir une loi plus claire.
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-11-27 10:24 [p.2607]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am pleased to participate in the discussion on Bill C-7, an act to amend the Criminal Code regarding medical assistance in dying.
I have the privilege of being a member of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. The committee heard from quite a few eminent witnesses during its examination of the bill. Their testimony before the committee gave rise to a number of reasoned amendments that were the subject of a lively debate among committee members.
I would like to take this opportunity to give members of the House an overview of the committee's work on Bill C-7 because I believe it could help inform upcoming discussions on this important legislative measure.
Before I do that, I want to emphasize to members of this place the looming court-imposed deadline to pass this legislation by December 18. It is important that we move expeditiously on this piece of legislation to ensure we do not prolong the suffering of Canadians or create an uneven law in respect of medical assistance in dying across the country.
The most important change put forward by Bill C-7 is its repeal of the reasonable foreseeability of natural death criterion in response to the decision in Truchon. The committee heard from several disability organizations and individuals living with disabilities who shared powerful testimony about autonomy, what it means to make a truly informed and voluntary choice, and the inherent dangers they perceive in shifting Canada's MAID regime away from an end-of-life one toward one that, in their words, made disability a justification to end life.
I want to discuss some of the amendments that were not adopted. This is an important piece of legislation and a very challenging issue, and we faced some difficult questions at committee. The majority of the members at committee ultimately felt confident that the current eligibility criteria in the MAID provisions adequately protect Canadians. There is a requirement that for people to be eligible for medical assistance in dying, their suffering must either be due to illness, disease or disability, or an advanced state of decline in capability. Suffering that would be solely due to factors like a lack of supports or the experience of inequality would not make a person eligible for MAID.
Of course, people can experience intolerable suffering for different reasons, and that brings me to the eligibility criteria that will apply in all cases and how they protect people.
Individuals are eligible for medical assistance in dying only if they make a voluntary request that is not coerced and give informed consent. We are confident that these criteria, combined with the judgment of practitioners who assesses eligibility for medical assistance in dying, will address those concerns.
The committee also studied the two-track system proposed in Bill C-7, paying special attention to the fact that reasonably foreseeable natural death will no longer be one of the eligibility criteria, but the factor that determines which set of safeguards applies in a given case.
The committee examined the possibility of defining this criterion as meaning a person would have 12 months or less to live. The phrase “reasonably foreseeable natural death” requires a connection to death that is temporal but remains flexible. To some members and witnesses, that flexibility sacrifices certainty, which can make the job of practitioners more difficult. This concern is what prompted the suggestion that we define it as requiring a prognosis of 12 months.
The majority of the committee members chose not to adopt that amendment, as we believe practitioners are able to continue to make determinations on the basis of the flexible criterion they have been using to date. That evaluation is determined on a case-by-case basis. The reasonably foreseeable natural death criterion does not have an arbitrary 12-month outer limit, so this proposed amendment would have narrowed its meaning.
The committee also discussed possible amendments to maintain the 10-day reflection period for people whose death is reasonably foreseeable, which is what we are talking about today, to reduce that period to seven days and to maintain the safeguard requiring two independent witnesses.
In the end, those amendments to Bill C-7 were not adopted. I think that is the right decision because I feel that changes to the existing safeguards are in line with feedback we got from practitioners across the country who participated in the January 2020 consultations. A number of the witnesses who appeared before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights reiterated that.
I do not think these changes will cause any harm or make the process any less safe for those whose death is reasonably foreseeable. We do believe that these changes will alleviate suffering.
The committee also discussed amendments that would have lengthened the assessment period when death is not reasonably foreseeable to 120 days, and transformed it into a reflection period. The majority of the committee members did not accept these amendments, as we feel they would have prolonged suffering for those whose deaths are not reasonably foreseeable, without necessarily improving the safety of the regime.
The 90-day period is meant to be an assessment period, not a reflection period. I have already mentioned that in the course of today's debate. During that assessment period, practitioners evaluate eligibility, canvass other options for relieving a person's suffering and discuss these options with the person in question. It is not intended to impose a minimum waiting period after a person is found to be eligible.
We believe that Bill C-7 strikes the right balance between safety and patient autonomy, particularly given that we are amending the Criminal Code, which sets out the minimum requirements for a practitioner to rely on exemptions to otherwise applicable criminal offences. A practitioner could always spend more time assessing a patient, if they believe it to be necessary in the given case, again, underscoring the individualized nature of the assessment.
The committee did adopt an amendment, which the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands just mentioned, which I think will improve the second track of safeguards for those whose deaths are not reasonably foreseeable.
As introduced, Bill C-7 required that one of the two assessors have expertise in the condition that is causing the person's suffering. The committee heard that this requirement could pose significant barriers to access since experts are rarely made assessors. While they may be willing to provide their expert advice in a case, they may not be willing to undertake the entirety of an assessment for a patient that they do not know and may feel their time is better spent delivering that expert care to others.
The amendment, moved by the NDP member for Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, would allow the assessors to consult an expert when neither of them has the relevant experience. We appreciate this evidence-based adjustment to the bill.
The committee also accepted an amendment proposed by the member for Nanaimo—Ladysmith. Here is the reference made by the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands. This amendment would require the Minister of Health, in carrying out her duties related to subsection 241.31(3), to consult, when appropriate, with the minister responsible for the status of persons with disabilities. These duties would include developing regulations in support of monitoring medical assistance in dying and establishing guidelines for the death certificate reporting of medically assisted deaths.
While I am confident that the current Minister of Health has been and would continue to do this in any event, I am very happy to see this enshrined in the legislative package to ensure that the voices of the disability community are heard in this process.
I want to thank my colleagues, including the members opposite, who participated in the justice committee for their thoughtful interventions and their thoughtful deliberations. I want to emphasize to my colleagues the importance of moving quickly on this legislation because of the court-imposed deadline by the Truchon decision.
I want to raise one point that has come up in the context of what was raised by the member for St. Albert—Edmonton. This was the idea that the proposed package actually perpetuates discrimination vis-à-vis persons with disabilities. The issue of disability discrimination was canvassed directly in the Truchon decision, and in that case the court said, and I will quote from paragraph 681:
...the challenged provision perhaps perpetuates another probably more pernicious stereotype: the inability to consent fully to medical assistance in dying. Yet the evidence amply establishes that Mr. Truchon is fully capable of exercising fundamental choices concerning his life and his death. As a consequence, he is deprived of the exercise of these choices essential to his dignity as a human being due to his personal characteristics that the challenged provision does not consider. He can neither commit suicide by a method of his own choosing nor legally request this assistance.
[682] Individuals in the same position as Mr. Truchon must be allowed to exercise full autonomy not only at the end of life, but also at any moment during their life, even if this means death, where the other eligibility conditions for medical assistance in dying are met.
[683] The Court thus concludes that s. 241.2(2)(d) of the Criminal Code clearly infringes the applicants’ right to equality.
Equality is critical here. The point I am making is that discrimination against persons with disabilities cannot be tolerated and should never be countenanced. The point that was made in the court and the point we are making on this side of the House is that in order to entrench equality, to fulfill the promise of the charter in section 15, we must empower persons with disabilities to make the exact same choices, give consent and exercise the same autonomy over their bodies as persons who are not disabled. That is what the court drove at in the Truchon decision. That is what this bill reflects.
Madame la Présidente, je suis heureux d'ajouter ma voix aux discussions sur le projet de loi C-7, Loi modifiant le Code criminel relativement à l'aide médicale à mourir.
J'ai le privilège d'être membre du Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne de la Chambre des communes. Le Comité a entendu bon nombre d'éminents témoins au cours de son étude du projet de loi. Leur témoignage devant le Comité a donné lieu à plusieurs amendements judicieux qui ont suscité des débats animés parmi les membres du Comité.
J'aimerais profiter de cette occasion pour donner aux députés de la Chambre un aperçu des travaux du Comité concernant le projet de loi C-7, car j'estime que ces renseignements pourraient éclairer les discussions à venir sur cette importante mesure législative.
Cependant, je veux d'abord souligner aux députés que la date limite imposée par la cour pour adopter cette mesure législative arrive à grands pas: c'est le 18 décembre. Il est donc important que nous procédions rapidement afin de ne pas prolonger les souffrances des Canadiens ou nous retrouver avec une loi sur l'aide médicale à mourir qui est inégale à l'échelle du pays.
En réponse à la décision Truchon, le projet de loi C-7 propose d'abroger la disposition exigeant que la mort naturelle soit raisonnablement prévisible. C'est la modification la plus importante qui y est prévue. Le Comité a entendu plusieurs personnes handicapées et représentants d'organisations œuvrant pour elles qui ont livré des témoignages percutants sur l'autonomie, l'importance de pouvoir faire un choix vraiment éclairé et volontaire et les dangers inhérents qu'ils perçoivent dans le passage du régime d'aide médicale à mourir du Canada d'un régime de fin de vie à un régime où, selon eux, les handicaps seraient utilisés pour justifier la décision de mettre fin à une vie.
Je veux discuter de certains des amendements qui n'ont pas été adoptés. Il s'agit là d'une mesure législative cruciale qui porte sur un enjeu très délicat, et nous avons dû répondre à des questions difficiles au Comité. En fin de compte, la majorité des membres du Comité avait la conviction que, sous leur forme actuelle, les critères d'admissibilité à l'aide médicale à mourir protègent adéquatement les Canadiens. Pour que les gens soient admissibles à l'aide médicale à mourir, leurs souffrances doivent être causées par une maladie, une affection ou un handicap, ou ils doivent connaître un déclin avancé de leurs capacités. Une personne ne serait pas admissible à l'aide médicale à mourir si ses souffrances étaient uniquement causées par des facteurs comme un manque de soutien ou un sentiment d'inégalité.
Certes, les souffrances intolérables d'une personne peuvent avoir différentes causes, ce qui m'amène à parler des critères d'admissibilité qui seront toujours applicables et de leur effet protecteur.
Une personne n'est admissible à l'aide médicale à mourir que si elle présente une demande volontaire, sans aucune pression externe, et qu'elle donne son consentement éclairé. Nous pouvons avoir la conviction que ces critères, combinés au jugement du praticien qui évalue l'admissibilité à l'aide médicale à mourir, permettront de remédier à ces préoccupations.
Le Comité s'est aussi penché sur le système à deux voies proposé dans le projet de loi C-7, et en particulier sur le fait que l'expression « mort naturelle raisonnablement prévisible » ne serait plus un critère d'admissibilité, mais le facteur permettant de déterminer quel ensemble de mesures de sauvegarde s'applique à un cas en particulier.
Le Comité a étudié la possibilité de définir ce critère pour indiquer qu'une personne n'aurait que 12 mois ou moins à vivre. L'expression « mort naturelle raisonnablement prévisible » suppose un lien temporel avec la mort tout en offrant une certaine souplesse. Aux yeux de certains membres et de certains témoins, cette souplesse compromet la certitude, ce qui peut compliquer la tâche aux praticiens. C'est de cette préoccupation que découle la suggestion de définir ce critère comme nécessitant un pronostic de 12 mois.
La majorité des membres du Comité ont choisi de ne pas appuyer l'amendement, car ils considèrent que les praticiens sont en mesure de continuer à prendre des décisions en fonction du critère souple utilisé jusqu'à maintenant. Cette évaluation est effectuée au cas par cas. Le critère de mort naturelle raisonnablement prévisible n'a pas de limite arbitraire de 12 mois. L'amendement proposé aurait donc restreint son sens.
Le Comité a également discuté de possibles amendements en vue de maintenir la période de réflexion de 10 jours pour les personnes dont la mort est raisonnablement prévisible, ce dont nous discutons aujourd'hui, et de réduire cette période à sept jours, et de maintenir la mesure de sauvegarde exigeant deux témoins indépendants.
Finalement, ces amendements au projet de loi C-7 n'ont pas été adoptés. J'estime qu'il s'agit de la bonne décision, parce que, selon moi, les changements apportés aux mesures de sauvegarde en place correspondent à l'avis des praticiens de partout au pays que nous avons entendus durant les consultations de janvier 2020. Cela a été réitéré par plusieurs témoins devant le Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne.
Selon moi, ces changements ne causeront aucun tort ni ne rendront le processus moins sûr pour ceux dont la mort est raisonnablement prévisible. Nous croyons toutefois qu'ils allégeront les souffrances.
Le comité a également discuté des amendements qui auraient prolongé la période d'évaluation, dans les cas où la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible, pour l'établir à 120 jours, et qui en auraient fait une période de réflexion. La majorité des membres du comité ont rejeté ces amendements, car ils pensent qu'ils ne feraient que prolonger les souffrances des personnes dont la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible, sans nécessairement rendre le régime plus sûr.
La période de 90 jours se veut une période d'évaluation, et non de réflexion. J'en ai déjà parlé dans le cadre du débat d'aujourd'hui. Pendant cette période, les médecins évaluent l'admissibilité du patient, examinent les autres options qui permettraient d'alléger ses souffrances et discutent de ces choix avec lui. Elle ne vise pas à imposer une période d'attente minimale une fois que la personne a été jugée admissible.
Nous pensons que le projet de loi C-7 établit un juste équilibre entre la sécurité et l'autonomie du patient, d'autant plus que nous modifions le Code criminel, lequel établit les exigences minimales qu'un médecin doit respecter pour être admissible aux exemptions qui s'appliquent aux infractions criminelles pertinentes. Un médecin pourrait toujours évaluer le patient pendant une période plus longue s'il le juge nécessaire dans un cas donné, ce qui nous ramène au fait que l'évaluation est individualisée.
Le comité a adopté un amendement — la députée de Saanich—Gulf Islands vient de le mentionner — qui améliorera le deuxième ensemble de mesures de sauvegarde, celui pour les personnes dont la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible.
Dans sa première version, le projet de loi C-7 exigeait que l'un des deux évaluateurs possède une expertise en ce qui concerne la condition à l'origine des souffrances de la personne. Le comité s'est fait dire que cette exigence pourrait constituer un important obstacle à l'évaluation, puisqu'il est rare qu'un expert évalue des demandeurs d'aide médicale à mourir. Il peut être prêt à donner son avis d'expert sur un dossier, mais il pourrait ne pas vouloir faire toute l'évaluation d'un patient qu'il ne connaît pas et être d'avis que son expertise serait plus utile s'il l'employait pour s'occuper d'autres patients.
L'amendement, proposé par le député néo-démocrate d'Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, permettrait aux évaluateurs de consulter un expert si aucun d'eux ne possède d'expérience pertinente. Nous appuyons cet amendement au projet de loi fondé sur les données probantes.
Le comité a aussi adopté un amendement proposé par le député de Nanaimo—Ladysmith. La députée de Saanich—Gulf Islands a précisé que cet amendement exigerait que la ministre de la Santé, dans l'exercice de ses responsabilités au titre du paragraphe 241.31(3), consulte, lorsque c'est indiqué, le ministre responsable de la condition des personnes handicapées. Ces responsabilités comprendraient l'élaboration d'un cadre de réglementation pour le régime de surveillance à l'égard de l'aide médicale à mourir ainsi que l'établissement de directives concernant la déclaration de renseignements relatifs aux certificats de décès des personnes ayant reçu l'aide médicale à mourir.
Même si je suis convaincu que la ministre de la Santé actuelle le fait déjà et continuerait de le faire de toute façon, je suis très heureux que ce soit prévu dans la mesure législative pour veiller à ce les personnes handicapées puissent se faire entendre dans le cadre de ce processus.
Je tiens à remercier mes collègues, y compris les députés d'en face qui ont participé aux travaux du comité, de leurs interventions et de leurs délibérations réfléchies. Je tiens aussi à souligner combien il est important de faire avancer rapidement ce projet de loi en raison de l'échéance imposée par le tribunal dans la décision Truchon.
Je veux revenir sur un point soulevé par le député de St. Albert—Edmonton, à savoir que les dispositions législatives proposées perpétuent en fait la discrimination envers les personnes handicapées. Le tribunal s'est penché expressément sur la question de la discrimination envers les personnes handicapées dans la décision Truchon. Voici ce qu'il dit au paragraphe 681:
[...] la disposition contestée perpétue peut-être un autre stéréotype probablement plus pernicieux — soit l'incapacité à pleinement consentir à l'aide médicale à mourir. Or, la preuve démontre amplement que M. Truchon demeure parfaitement apte à exercer des choix fondamentaux concernant sa vie et sa mort. Il se trouve par conséquent privé d'exercer ces choix essentiels à sa dignité d'être humain en raison de ses caractéristiques propres dont la disposition contestée ne tient pas compte. Il ne peut ni se suicider par un moyen qu'il choisirait, ni demander cette aide en toute légalité.
[682] La pleine autonomie des personnes placées dans la même situation que M. Truchon doit pouvoir s'exercer non seulement en fin de vie, mais aussi à tout moment au cours de leur vie et ce, même si cela signifie la mort, lorsque les autres conditions d'admissibilité à l'aide médicale à mourir sont satisfaites.
[683] Ainsi, le Tribunal conclut que l'alinéa 241.2(2)d) du Code criminel porte clairement atteinte au droit à l'égalité des demandeurs.
L'égalité est essentielle ici. Ce que j'essaie de dire, c'est que la discrimination à l'endroit des personnes handicapées ne peut pas et ne devrait jamais être tolérée. Ce que les tribunaux ont fait valoir, et ce que les députés de ce côté-ci de la Chambre font valoir, c'est que pour garantir l'égalité, pour remplir la promesse de l'article 15 de la Charte, nous devons donner aux personnes handicapées les moyens de faire exactement les mêmes choix que ceux présentés aux personnes qui ne sont pas handicapées, les moyens de donner leur consentement et de disposer de leur corps comme elles l'entendent. C'est ce que les tribunaux ont conclu dans l'affaire Truchon. C'est ce que prévoit le projet de loi.
Collapse
View David Sweet Profile
CPC (ON)
View David Sweet Profile
2020-11-27 10:33 [p.2609]
Expand
Madam Speaker, in a debate this important, I think it is important that my hon. colleague, whom I have respect for and have worked with on human rights, would not stoop so low as to impugn the motives of my colleague in regard to the 10-day period for reflection. The notion that he would want someone to suffer more is reprehensible.
It is a different situation, but my daughter took her own life and left a note. She took her own life in the context of having, at one point of her life, an unbelievable amount of stress so that she made a bad decision one evening, alone. It is not temporary. It is absolute.
The point that we are arguing is that, once this decision is made, it cannot be reversed. The notion that we are trying to make people suffer, as I said, is reprehensible. The idea is to make sure that someone who is in a bad situation, who might the next day find more light and hope, would not make a bad decision and completely eliminate the breath of their own life.
Madame la Présidente, dans le cadre d'un débat aussi substantiel, je pense que c'est important que le député, que je respecte et avec qui j'ai collaboré dans le dossier des droits de la personne, ne s'abaisse pas à mettre en doute les motifs de mon collègue au sujet de la période de réflexion de 10 jours. L'idée qu'il voudrait que quelqu'un souffre davantage est répréhensible.
Je sais que c'est une situation différente, mais ma fille s'est enlevé la vie et a laissé une note. Elle s'est enlevé la vie parce que, à un certain moment, elle combattait une quantité de stress énorme. Elle a pris cette mauvaise décision un soir, alors qu'elle était seule. Ce n'est pas une décision qui engendre des conséquences temporaires. Les conséquences sont permanentes.
Ce que nous disons, c'est qu'une fois la décision prise, il est impossible de revenir en arrière. Je le répète, l'idée voulant que nous essayions de faire souffrir les gens plus longtemps est répréhensible. Ce que nous voulons, c'est de veiller à ce que les personnes qui se retrouvent dans une mauvaise situation et qui pourraient, du jour au lendemain, trouver une lueur d'espoir ne prennent pas une mauvaise décision qui mettrait fin à leur vie.
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-11-27 10:35 [p.2609]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank the member for his contributions today and in this Parliament. I offer my sympathies to him for the loss within his family.
The point I was making earlier in this debate was simply to reflect what we heard during the consultations. The 10-day reflection period is entrenched in the old Bill C-14. When Canada was embarking on this for the first time in its history, it was deemed necessary to do the work of ensuring that consideration and time for reflection was available.
What we have found four years after the fact, after extensive consultations, is that the goal of that 10-day reflection period was not actually doing what it was intended to do. As an unintended consequence it was actually prolonging suffering.
The point underscoring this difference in views on either side of the House is that when people get to the stage of asking for medical assistance in dying, they have already reflected upon it. They have already considered it and have gotten to that point after very appropriate and measured determination.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie le député pour son apport au débat aujourd'hui, et à la Chambre en général. Je lui offre mes sincères condoléances pour la perte de sa fille.
Le point que j'ai soulevé plus tôt ne faisait que refléter ce que nous avons entendu au cours des consultations. La période de réflexion de 10 jours est prescrite dans l'ancienne version, le projet de loi C-14. Lorsque le Canada s'est lancé dans ce débat pour la première fois de son histoire, tous s'entendaient sur la nécessité de prévoir une période de réflexion.
Quatre ans après l'entrée en vigueur de la loi et après de vastes consultations, on a conclu que la période de réflexion de 10 jours n'accomplissait pas l'objectif voulu. Comme conséquence inattendue, elle prolongeait la souffrance inutilement.
L'élément à prendre en considération dans la divergence d'opinions entre les deux côtés de la Chambre est que lorsqu'une personne demande l'aide médicale à mourir, elle a déjà mûrement réfléchi sa décision. L'option a déjà été envisagée et la décision définitive repose sur une réflexion mesurée et pertinente.
Collapse
View Sébastien Lemire Profile
BQ (QC)
View Sébastien Lemire Profile
2020-11-27 10:36 [p.2609]
Expand
Madam Speaker, in an article yesterday, Joan Bryden of the Canadian Press reported that the Minister of Disability Inclusion believes that health practitioners should not be allowed to discuss the issue of medical assistance in dying until a patient asks about it, and that she is open to amending the legislation to make that clear. Some health care practitioners, however, disagree with that position, arguing that they have a duty to talk about all options available to patients. Have they ever thought about it? What are their thoughts on life and death? These are very simple questions.
The Canadian Nurses Association has urged the government to specifically clarify in the law that health practitioners can initiate discussions on medical assistance in dying with their patients. I would add that Jocelyn Downie, a professor of law and medicine at Dalhousie University in Halifax, said that informing patients about all options available to them is a fundamental principle of Canadian consent law. In her view, an amendment that prohibits raising the issue would be a cruel amendment and would fly in the face of well-established statutory and professional legal standards. She went on to say that it would also likely chill discussions of medical assistance in dying, as clinicians may fear liability.
I would like to know what the government really thinks about this matter.
Madame la Présidente, hier, par la plume de Joan Bryden de la Presse canadienne, on apprenait que la ministre de l'Inclusion des personnes handicapées estime que les professionnels de la santé ne devraient pas être autorisés à discuter de l'aide médicale à mourir avec leurs patients tant que ceux-ci ne posent pas de questions à ce sujet, et qu'elle est disposée à modifier la loi pour que ce soit clair. Certains praticiens de la santé ne sont cependant pas d'accord sur son point de vue, estimant que c'est leur devoir d'aborder toutes les options disponibles avec leurs patients. Est-ce qu'ils y ont déjà pensé? Qu'est-ce qu'ils pensent de la vie et de leur mort? Ce sont des questions très simples.
L'Association des infirmières et infirmiers du Canada a exhorté le gouvernement à préciser explicitement dans la loi que les professionnels de la santé peuvent entamer des discussions sur l'aide médicale à mourir avec leurs patients. J'ajouterais aussi que Jocelyn Downie, une professeure de droit et de médecine à l'Université Dalhousie, à Halifax, a affirmé qu’informer les patients de toutes les options à leur disposition était un principe fondamental de la loi canadienne sur le consentement. Selon elle, un amendement qui interdirait de soulever la question serait un amendement cruel et irait à l'encontre des normes statutaires juridiques professionnelles bien établies. De plus, ajoutait-elle, cela refroidirait probablement aussi les discussions sur l'aide médicale à mourir, car les cliniciens pourraient craindre une responsabilité.
J'aimerais savoir ce que le gouvernement en pense concrètement.
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-11-27 10:37 [p.2609]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I appreciate the question from the member opposite. I want to point out two or three things.
First, there are quite a few protections for all doctors and nurses in the current legislation.
Second, they are quite free to discuss all options and the medical assistance in dying process before proceeding with that process. They are even encouraged to do so. That is exactly what is stated in the provisions concerning the second track, that is, in a situation where death is not reasonably foreseeable.
Third, in committee we discussed the position taken by the Canadian Nurses Association. It was noted that there is already a fairly wide range of protections for practitioners, whether nurses or doctors, against litigation or a complaint about their action, because they continue to have conscience rights, as well as the right to have an open discussion with their patients.
Madame la Présidente, j'apprécie la question du député d'en face. Je peux souligner deux ou trois choses.
Premièrement, il y a un assez grand nombre de protections pour tous les médecins et les infirmières dans le contexte de la loi actuelle.
Deuxièmement, ils sont tout à fait libres de discuter de toutes les options et du processus d'aide médicale à mourir avant d'entamer celui-ci. On les encourage même à le faire. C'est exactement ce qui est souligné dans les dispositions concernant la deuxième voie, c'est-à-dire celle où la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible.
Troisièmement, nous avons discuté de la position de l'Association des infirmières et infirmiers du Canada au comité, et on a souligné qu'il y avait déjà un assez large éventail de protections pour protéger les praticiens, que ce soit les infirmières ou les médecins, contre un litige ou une plainte vis-à-vis de leur action, parce qu'ils ont toujours le droit à la liberté de conscience, mais aussi le droit d'avoir une discussion libre avec leurs patients.
Collapse
View Andréanne Larouche Profile
BQ (QC)
View Andréanne Larouche Profile
2020-11-27 10:38 [p.2609]
Expand
Madam Speaker, as the saying goes, never two without three.
I rise today in the House of Commons to speak once again to the issue of medical assistance in dying as it pertains to Bill C-7, an act to amend the Criminal Code. However, this time we have a deadline set by Justice Baudouin, namely December 18, 2020, so there is a sense of urgency now.
I am likely repeating myself today, but many people here have had unique experiences involving the end of a loved one's life. I am thinking in particular of one of my old friends, Stéphane, who died in palliative care at a very young age, in his twenties. He was supported by the excellent Maison Au Diapason. He was one of the youngest patients to die there and one of the first as well. This type of assistance is essential and useful.
As the Bloc Québécois critic for the status of women and seniors, I naturally took a special interest in this bill. In this speech, I will be reminding everyone of all the work that my party has done on this important issue, while emphasizing the great sensitivity of Quebeckers when it comes to medical assistance in dying. I will conclude with the position that certain seniors' and women's groups have taken on this issue and the recommendations they made that are extremely useful, but that are already several years old. They too are starting to get impatient.
First, let's talk about the reason for this debate. In September 2019, the Superior Court of Quebec ruled in favour of Nicole Gladu and Jean Truchon, both of whom had incurable degenerative diseases. The court stated that one of the eligibility criteria for medical assistance in dying was too restrictive, both in the federal legislation covering MAID and in Quebec's Act respecting end-of-life care.
These two brave individuals, with whom I have mutual acquaintances, simply asked to be able to die with dignity, without needlessly prolonging their suffering. Mr. Truchon, who had cerebral palsy, had lost the use of all four limbs and had difficulty speaking. Ms. Gladu, who has post-polio syndrome, is not able to control her pain with medication and cannot stay in the same position for too long because of the constant pain. She has said that she loves life too much to settle for mere existence. That is what she said.
What we are talking about here is the criterion of a reasonably foreseeable death. Justice Christine Baudouin said it well in her ruling:
The Court has no hesitation in concluding that the reasonably foreseeable natural death requirement infringes Mr. Truchon and Ms. Gladu's rights to liberty and security, protected by section 7 of the Charter.
That is the crux of our debate. These advocates had been denied medical assistance in dying because their death was not reasonably foreseeable, even though they had legitimately demonstrated their desire to stop suffering. Jean Truchon had chosen to die in June 2020, but he moved up the date because of the pandemic. Nicole Gladu is still living, and I commend her for her courage and determination.
The Bloc Québécois's position on this ethical issue is very clear, and I want to thank the member for Montcalm for his excellent work. I will not be as technical as him, but he showed us that we are capable of working together, and I thank him for all of the improvements that he made to this bill.
As many members have already pointed out, legislators did not do their job properly with the former Bill C-14. As a result, issues of a social and political nature are being brought before the courts. We need to make sure that people who have irreversible illnesses are not forced to go to court to access MAID. Do we really want to inflict more suffering on people who are already suffering greatly by forcing them to go to court for the right to make the very personal decision about their end of life? This will inevitably happen if we cannot figure out a way to cover cognitive degenerative diseases.
Obviously, we agree that we need to proceed with caution before including mental health issues, but that is not the issue today, since MAID in mental health-related cases was excluded from the bill. Once again, this matter was brought before the Standing Committee on Health via a motion moved by my colleague from Montcalm.
Second, I want to talk about how important Quebec is in this context. Quebec enacted the country's first legislation on this subject. Wanda Morris, a member of a B.C. group that advocates for the right to die with dignity, talked about how a committee that got the unanimous support of all parties in the National Assembly was a model for the rest of Canada. She said it was reassuring to see how it was working in Quebec and that people were happy to have the option to die with dignity.
However, it is important to know that this bill was first introduced by Véronique Hivon and that it was the fruit of many years of research and consultations with individuals, doctors, ethicists and patients. Whereas 79% of Quebeckers are in favour of medical assistance in dying, only 68% of people in the rest of Canada are. Those numbers are worth knowing and mentioning.
In 2015, when all parties in Quebec's National Assembly unanimously welcomed the Supreme Court's ruling on medical assistance in dying, Véronique Hivon had this to say:
Today is truly a great day for people who are ill, for people who are at the end of their lives...for Quebec and for all Quebeckers who participated in this democratic debate...that the National Assembly had the courage to initiate in 2009.
I believe that, collectively, Quebec has really paved the way, and and we have done so in the best possible way, in a non-partisan, totally democratic way.
For the third part of my speech, I would like to tell you about a meeting I had with the Association féminine d'éducation et d'action sociale in my role as the Bloc Québécois critic for status of women, gender equality and seniors. At this meeting, these brave women shared with me their concerns about this issue.
I will quote the AFEAS 2018-19 issue guide:
Is medical assistance in dying a quality of life issue? For those individuals who can no longer endure life and who meet the many criteria for obtaining this assistance, the opportunity to express their last wishes is undoubtedly welcome. This glimmer of autonomy can be reassuring and make it possible to face death more calmly. ... As the process for obtaining medical assistance in dying is very restrictive, those who use it probably do so for a very simple reason: they have lost all hope. ... This process cannot be accessed by individuals who are not at the end of life. ... People with degenerative diseases, who are suffering physically and mentally, do not have access to medical assistance in dying.
A brief submitted in 2010, or 10 years ago, to the Select Committee on Dying with Dignity, explained that the last moments are not always difficult because there are standards to guide medical practice and medical advances help relieve pain. However, despite everyone's goodwill, some people do have unfortunate experiences. Consequently, to prevent prolonged agony from depriving some people of their dignity and control over their lives, there are those calling for as a last resort the right to die with dignity, or the right to die at a time of one's choosing with assistance in this last stage.
Another brief pointed out that there have been four separate attempts to introduce similar legislation, specifically in 1994, 2005, 2008 and 2009, but these bills have never gone further than first reading. This needs to pass.
I will now read the conclusion from the AFEAS brief, as it is really powerful:
Over the next few months, AFEAS members will continue to reflect on the framework in which individuals losing their autonomy or suffering from an incurable, disabling illness, or experiencing acute physical or mental pain without any prospect of relief will be able to clearly and unequivocally express their desire to stop fighting to live and seek assistance to die.
Establishing the framework in which these decisions are made will be critical to ensuring that abuse cannot occur. The guidelines must be clear and precise so that all individuals can freely express their own choices, without any constraints and with full knowledge of all available options. It will be essential that all end-of-life services, including palliative care, be available and effective throughout Quebec so that patients have a real choice and do not feel forced to accept a “default” option because of a lack of adequate services or undue pressure from others.
I will also close now, in the hope that all of these comments and the lived experiences of the people in Quebec who made the request and wanted to die with dignity will afford Bill C-7 the same unanimous support from all members of the House of Commons so that we may all freely choose when we die. Let's take action.
Madame la Présidente, comme on le dit, jamais deux sans trois.
Je prends la parole à la Chambre des communes aujourd'hui pour aborder encore une fois la question de l'aide médicale à mourir dans le cadre de l'étude du projet de loi C-7, Loi modifiant le Code criminel. Par contre, cette fois-ci, on arrive à une date ultime, celle fixée par la juge Baudoin, soit le 18 décembre 2020. On a donc un sentiment d'urgence, ici.
Je me répéterai fort probablement, aujourd'hui, mais de nombreuses personnes ici ont vécu des histoires singulières et uniques liées à la fin de vie de proches. J'ai une pensée toute particulière pour un de mes anciens copains, Stéphane, qui est décédé aux soins palliatifs à un très jeune âge, dans la vingtaine. Il a été accompagné par l'excellente Maison Au Diapason. Il a été l'un des plus jeunes à y mourir et l'un des premiers également. Ce genre d'aide est essentiel et utile.
En tant que porte-parole du Bloc québécois pour ce qui est de la condition féminine et des aînés, j'ai été naturellement interpellée par ce projet de loi. Je vais donc rappeler à tous, dans ce discours, tout le travail qui a été réalisé par mon parti sur cette importante question. Je vais aussi insister sur la grande sensibilité des Québécoises et des Québécois à l'égard de l'aide médicale à mourir. Enfin, je vais conclure avec la position de certains groupes d'aînés et de femmes qui poursuivent leur réflexion sur ce sujet avec des recommandations qui sont très pertinentes, mais qui datent déjà de plusieurs années. Eux aussi commencent à être impatients.
Parlons d'abord de la raison d'être de ce débat. En septembre 2019, la Cour supérieure du Québec a donné raison à Mme Nicole Gladu et à M. Jean Truchon, tous deux atteints d'une maladie dégénérative incurable. Elle affirmait qu'un des critères d'admissibilité à l'aide médicale à mourir était trop restrictif dans les deux lois des deux Parlements: la loi encadrant l'aide médicale à mourir, ici, à Ottawa, et la Loi concernant les soins de fin de vie, au Québec.
Ces deux braves personnes, que des gens que je connais ont côtoyées, demandent simplement à mourir dans la dignité sans éterniser inutilement leurs souffrances. Atteint de paralysie cérébrale, M. Truchon a perdu l'usage de ses quatre membres et il s'exprime avec difficulté. Souffrant d'un syndrome post-poliomyélitique, Mme Gladu ne voit plus ses douleurs allégées par les médicaments et elle ne peut plus rester dans la même position trop longtemps, vu la douleur constante. Elle a dit qu'elle aimait trop la vie pour se contenter de ce qui est devenu une existence. C'est ce qu'elle a affirmé.
Ce dont on parle ici, c'est le critère de mort raisonnablement prévisible. La juge Christine Baudouin l'a très bien exprimé dans son jugement:
Le Tribunal n’entretient aucune hésitation à conclure que l’exigence de la mort naturelle raisonnablement prévisible brime les droits à la liberté et à la sécurité de M. Truchon et de Mme Gladu, garantis par l’article 7 de la Charte.
C'est ce qui est au cœur de notre débat. Les défenseurs constataient que l'on avait refusé l'aide médicale à mourir à ces personnes parce que la mort n'était pas imminente, et ce, malgré la démonstration légitime de leur volonté de cesser de souffrir. Jean Truchon avait choisi de mourir en juin 2020, mais il a devancé la date de son décès à cause des difficultés liées à la pandémie. Nicole Gladu est toujours vivante, et je salue son courage et sa détermination.
La position du Bloc québécois sur cette question d'éthique est très claire, et je tiens à remercier le député de Montcalm de son travail exceptionnel. Je serai peut-être moins technique que lui, mais il nous a montré que nous sommes capables de collaborer, et je le remercie pour toutes les améliorations qu'il a apportées dans ce dossier.
En ce qui concerne l'ancien projet de loi C-14, comme plusieurs l'ont déjà démontré, les législateurs n'ont pas fait leur travail, et par conséquent, on risque de judiciariser des questions qui seraient plutôt d'ordre social et politique. On ne veut certainement pas que les personnes qui souffrent de maladies incurables se voient obligées d'aller devant des tribunaux pour avoir droit à l'aide médicale à mourir. Souhaitons-nous vraiment demander à des gens durement éprouvés d'alourdir leurs souffrances en judiciarisant leur choix le plus intime, celui de la façon dont ils veulent vivre leur mort? D'ailleurs, si nous n'arrivons pas à couvrir ultimement les personnes atteintes de maladies cognitives dégénératives, ce genre de situation va arriver.
Alors, évidemment, nous sommes d'accord pour dire qu'il faut être très prudent avant d'inclure les questions de santé mentale, mais là n’est pas la question aujourd'hui, puisque, de toute façon, cela a été exclu du projet de loi. Encore une fois, cela a été un travail qui a été apporté au Comité permanent de la santé par l'entremise d'une motion de mon collègue de Montcalm.
Deuxièmement, je tiens à rappeler l'importance du Québec relativement à cette question. En effet, la première loi portant sur ce sujet au Canada a eu lieu au Québec. Wanda Morris, qui est membre d'un groupe pour le droit de mourir dans la dignité en Colombie-Britannique, a mentionné qu'un comité qui faisait l'unanimité parmi tous les partis à l'Assemblée nationale était un modèle pour le reste du Canada. Elle se disait rassurée de voir que cela fonctionnait au Québec et que les gens étaient heureux d'avoir cette possibilité de mourir dans la dignité.
Cependant, il faut savoir que ce projet de loi avait été amené d'abord par Mme Véronique Hivon, et cela a été le fruit de plusieurs années de recherches et de consultations auprès de citoyens, de médecins, d'éthiciens et de patients. D'ailleurs, 79 % des Québécoises et des Québécois sont en faveur de l'aide médicale à mourir, contre 68 % des gens ailleurs au Canada. Ce sont des chiffres qui valent quand même la peine d'être connus et mentionnés.
Lorsque les partis rassemblés à l'Assemblée nationale du Québec ont salué à l'unanimité, en 2015, le jugement de la Cour suprême sur l'aide médicale à mourir, Véronique Hivon a déclaré:
C'est vraiment un grand jour pour les personnes malades, pour les personnes qui sont en fin de vie [...] pour le Québec, pour tous les Québécois qui ont participé à ce [débat] démocratique [...] que l'Assemblée nationale a eu le courage de mettre en place en 2009.
Je pense que, collectivement, le Québec a vraiment tracé la voie et qu'il l'a fait de la belle manière possible, c'est-à-dire de manière non partisane et totalement démocratique.
En troisième lieu, j'aimerais faire rapport d'une rencontre que j'ai eue avec l'Association féminine d'éducation et d'action sociale dans le cadre de mes fonctions de porte-parole du Bloc québécois pour la condition féminine, l'égalité des genres et les aînés. Lors de notre réunion, ces braves femmes m'ont fait part de leurs préoccupations face à cette question.
Dans le guide d'animation 2018-2019 de l'AFEAS, on peut lire ceci:
Est-ce que l'aide médicale fait partie de la qualité de vie? Pour les personnes qui n'en peuvent plus d'attendre la fin et qui répondent aux nombreux critères que l'on doit rencontrer pour obtenir cette aide, cette occasion d'exprimer leurs dernières volontés est sans doute bienvenue. Ce sursaut d'autonomie peut être rassurant et peut permettre d'envisager la mort plus sereinement. [...] Les procédures pour obtenir l'aide médicale à mourir étant très contraignantes, les personnes qui y ont recours le font probablement pour une raison bien simple: elles n'ont plus d'espoir. [...] Cette procédure n'est pas accessible aux personnes qui ne sont pas en fin de vie [...] Des personnes qui sont atteintes de maladies dégénératives, qui souffrent dans leur corps et dans leur tête, n'ont pas accès à l'aide médicale à mourir.
Un mémoire présenté en 2010 — il y a donc déjà 10 ans — à la Commission spéciale de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec sur la question de mourir dans la dignité, expliquait que les derniers moments ne sont pas toujours pénibles puisque des normes guident la pratique médicale et que les progrès de la médecine aident à soulager le mal. Cependant, malgré la bonne volonté du monde, il arrive encore que des expériences malheureuses se produisent. Par conséquent, pour éviter qu'une agonie prolongée ne prive certaines personnes de leur dignité et du contrôle de leur vie, des voix s'élèvent pour réclamer en dernier recours le droit de mourir dignement, autrement dit le droit de mourir à l'heure de son choix en étant aidé dans cette ultime étape.
Un autre mémoire rappelait qu'à quatre reprises, soit en 1994, 2005, 2008 et 2009, des tentatives avaient été faites pour présenter ce type de projet de loi, mais qu'elles n'étaient jamais allées plus loin que l'étape de la première lecture. Il est temps que cela aboutisse.
Je vais maintenant lire la conclusion du mémoire de l'AFEAS, car c'était quelque chose:
Au cours des prochains mois, la réflexion des membres de l'AFEAS se poursuivra dans le but de préciser le cadre dans lequel une personne en perte d'autonomie ou souffrant d'une maladie incurable, invalidante ou éprouvant des douleurs physiques ou mentales aiguës sans perspective de soulagement, pourra exprimer clairement, sans équivoques, sa volonté de cesser son combat pour vivre et d'être aidée à mourir.
L'établissement du cadre dans lequel se prendront de telles décisions est primordial pour qu'aucune dérive ne soit possible. Il faut que les balises soient claires et précises pour que chaque individu puisse exprimer librement son propre choix, sans aucune contrainte et avec la parfaite connaissance des options qui s'offrent à lui. Il sera essentiel que tous les services de fin de vie (soins palliatifs ou autres) soient disponibles et efficaces, et ce, partout au Québec pour que les malades aient un véritable choix et ne se sentent pas forcés d'aller vers une option « par défaut » faute de services adéquats ou suite à des pressions indues d'autres personnes.
Je vais moi aussi conclure en espérant que tous ces commentaires et toutes ces expériences vécues au Québec dans le respect des personnes qui ont fait la demande et qui ont choisi de mourir dans la dignité permettront au projet de loi C-7 de soutenir l'aide médicale à mourir avec la même unanimité des députés à la Chambre des communes pour nous permettre de choisir librement le moment de notre mort. Agissons.
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-11-27 10:47 [p.2611]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I really appreciated the comments and speech from the hon. member on the other side.
On a number of occasions, here in the House today and in the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, it has been suggested that we are wrong not to appeal the Truchon decision to the Supreme Court of Canada.
On this side of the House, we believe that Justice Baudouin's ruling in Truchon and Gladu was well documented, well expressed and well supported by the evidence.
What does the member think about the possibility of appealing this decision to the Supreme Court? Would that risk prolonging the pain and suffering of Canadians?
Madame la Présidente, j'ai beaucoup apprécié les commentaires et le discours de l'honorable députée de l'autre côté de la Chambre.
Il a été soulevé à plusieurs reprises, tant au Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne qu'à la Chambre aujourd'hui, que l'on a tort de ne pas porter la décision Truchon en appel auprès de la Cour suprême du Canada.
De ce côté-ci de la Chambre, nous sommes d'avis que la décision rendue par la juge Baudouin dans l'affaire Truchon et Gladu était bien documentée, bien articulée et bien étayée par les faits.
De quel avis est la députée sur la possibilité d'en appeler de cette décision en Cour suprême? Cela risque-t-il de prolonger la souffrance et la douleur des Canadiens?
Collapse
View Andréanne Larouche Profile
BQ (QC)
View Andréanne Larouche Profile
2020-11-27 10:48 [p.2611]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for his comments.
I remind members that we have a deadline: December 18, 2020. This is our deadline to appeal the decision to the Supreme Court, after the original deadline was extended because of the COVID-19 crisis.
However, I think we are ready to make a decision. Everyone in the House can move this forward and pass the bill.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie beaucoup mon collègue de son commentaire.
Je rappelle que nous avons une date: le 18 décembre  2020. Cette deuxième date — la première ayant été reportée en raison de la crise de la COVID-19 — est la date limite pour en appeler de la décision auprès de la Cour suprême.
Cependant, je pense que nous sommes prêts à prendre une décision. Tout le monde à la Chambre peut faire avancer le dossier et adopter ce projet de loi.
Collapse
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2020-11-27 10:48 [p.2611]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank the member for Shefford for her excellent speech.
She mentioned my colleague from Joliette, Véronique Hivon, who did outstanding work in the Quebec National Assembly. She did politics differently. She talked to every party and said that they all needed to put partisanship aside, because this matter was too important.
Does my colleague from Shefford believe that the same kind of work has been done here, in the House?
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à remercier la députée de Shefford de son excellent discours.
Elle a parlé de ma collègue de Joliette, Véronique Hivon, qui a fait un travail exceptionnel à l'Assemblée nationale. Elle a fait de la politique autrement. Elle est allée voir chaque parti en disant qu'il fallait mettre la partisanerie de côté parce que ce sujet était trop important.
Ma collègue de Shefford croit-elle que le même genre de travail a été fait ici, à la Chambre?
Collapse
View Andréanne Larouche Profile
BQ (QC)
View Andréanne Larouche Profile
2020-11-27 10:49 [p.2611]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague from Joliette for the question.
Unfortunately, that was not the case. I recently had some conversations with Mrs. Hivon and she looks forward to seeing this file come to a close. She brought this legislation to Quebec City with a lot of heart and passion.
I do not want to pass judgment, but it is too bad that here in the House certain religious beliefs have coloured the debate on medical assistance in dying and delayed passage of the bill. There was not the same unanimity in the House of Commons as there was in the National Assembly.
It is a shame because this file should go beyond our political persuasions. This issue should be rooted in science and based on the advice of ethicists, doctors and experts. I think everyone has the right to choose freely how they will die, and that goes beyond beliefs. People who do not want to use medical assistance in dying can make that choice, and the bill allows for that.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon honorable collègue de Joliette de sa question.
Malheureusement, cela n'a pas été le cas. J'ai eu des échanges dernièrement avec Mme Hivon, et elle a bien hâte de voir ce dossier aboutir. Elle a porté ce projet de loi à Québec avec beaucoup de cœur et de passion.
Je ne veux pas porter de jugement, mais, ce qui est dommage, c'est que, à la Chambre, certaines croyances religieuses ont biaisé le débat sur l'aide médicale à mourir et ont retardé l'adoption de la Loi. Il n'y a donc pas eu la même unanimité à la Chambre des communes qu'à l'Assemblée nationale.
On peut le déplorer, parce que ce dossier devrait aller au-delà de nos allégeances. Cette question doit être basée sur la science et sur l'avis d'éthiciens, de médecins et de spécialistes. Je pense que chacun a le droit de choisir librement la façon dont il va mourir et que cela va au-delà des croyances. Les gens qui ne veulent pas avoir recours à l'aide médicale à mourir peuvent en faire le choix, et le projet de loi le permet également.
Collapse
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
View Randall Garrison Profile
2020-11-27 10:50 [p.2611]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank the hon. member for Shefford for bringing the individual situations of the plaintiffs in the Truchon case before the House again and for recognizing their bravery.
My question has to do with the unfortunate line I have heard in public, and even from some members of the official opposition, that somehow we have no obligation in Parliament to meet the deadline imposed by the decision of Madam Justice Beaudoin in the Truchon case. Not meeting that deadline would have serious consequences in Quebec.
I would like to hear the hon. member's comments on the question of the importance of meeting the court deadline.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie la députée de Shefford de rappeler à la Chambre la situation personnelle des demandeurs dans l'affaire Truchon et de souligner leur courage.
Ma question porte sur des propos malheureux que j'ai entendus de la part du grand public, et même de certains députés de l'opposition, à savoir que le Parlement n'a aucune obligation de respecter l'échéance fixée par la juge Beaudoin dans l'affaire Truchon. Ne pas respecter cette échéance entraînera de sérieuses conséquences au Québec.
J'aimerais entendre l'opinion de la députée concernant l'importance de respecter l'échéance fixée par la cour.
Collapse
View Andréanne Larouche Profile
BQ (QC)
View Andréanne Larouche Profile
2020-11-27 10:50 [p.2612]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for the question.
Indeed, the Superior Court of Quebec ordered federal and provincial legislation to be changed. That was supposed to be done before March 11, 2020. An extended deadline was granted by Justice Christine Baudouin and the deadline was pushed to December 18. I think there will be problems if we do not meet the December 18 deadline. That is why we must all move forward together and meet this deadline to avoid the problems that will come up if we do not comply with Justice Baudouin's order.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de sa question.
Effectivement, la Cour supérieure du Québec a ordonné que les lois fédérales et provinciales soient modifiées. Cela devait être fait avant le 11  mars 2020. Un délai supplémentaire a été accordé par la juge Christine Baudouin, et l'échéance a été repoussée au 18 décembre. Je pense qu'il va y avoir des problèmes si on n'arrive pas à respecter la date du 18 décembre. C'est pour cela que nous devons tous aller de l'avant, ensemble, et respecter cette date butoir afin d'éviter les problèmes qui pourraient survenir si nous ne réussissions pas à respecter cette demande de la juge Baudoin.
Collapse
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2020-11-27 10:51 [p.2612]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my Bloc Québécois colleague for her very interesting and very important speech.
The details she shared about Jean Truchon's case enabled us to understand the situation and the plans that have to be made in such a case. As my friend from Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke said, we really have to understand the importance and wisdom of Justice Baudouin's decision.
I just want to emphasize how important this bill is for reducing suffering across Canada. This bill will finally—
Madame la Présidente, je remercie ma collègue du Bloc québécois de son discours vraiment intéressant et très important.
Les détails qu'elle a donnés sur le cas de Jean Truchon nous ont permis de bien comprendre la situation et les plans qu'il faut faire dans un tel cas. Comme mon ami d'Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke l'a déjà dit, il faut absolument comprendre l'importance et l'intelligence de la décision de la juge Baudoin.
Je veux seulement ajouter qu'il faut souligner à quel point ce projet de loi est important pour réduire la souffrance partout au Canada. En effet, ce projet de loi va enfin...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 10:52 [p.2612]
Expand
Unfortunately, I have to ask the member for Shefford to keep her comment very brief.
Je dois malheureusement demander à la députée de Shefford de faire un très bref commentaire.
Collapse
View Andréanne Larouche Profile
BQ (QC)
View Andréanne Larouche Profile
2020-11-27 10:52 [p.2612]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for her comment.
She stressed the importance of this bill. Its primary purpose is to reduce everyone's suffering. Death is unavoidable. It is part of life. We are born and we know that, ultimately, we will die. We do not choose the moment of our birth, but—
Madame la Présidente, je remercie ma collègue de son commentaire.
Elle rappelle l'importance de ce projet de loi. Il vise, d'abord et avant tout, à limiter les souffrances de tout le monde. La mort est incontournable. Elle fait partie de la vie. On naît et on sait que, ultimement, on va mourir. On ne choisit pas le moment de sa naissance, mais...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 10:52 [p.2612]
Expand
Resuming debate.
The hon. member for Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke.
Nous reprenons le débat.
L'honorable député d'Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke a la parole.
Collapse
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
View Randall Garrison Profile
2020-11-27 10:52 [p.2612]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am very surprised we are debating these two motions from the official opposition again in the House when these had been dealt with in committee. Without reflecting on the past decision of the Speaker, I have some concerns with respect to future precedence in declaring something particularly important, that it not open the Chair to the accusation of having a position on a particular question.
With that aside, I will turn to what is now before us.
Everyone in the House has sincerely held beliefs on this very important and difficult question of how we deal with end of life in Canada. It is important we all be careful not to impute motives to our fellow members in this debate however difficult that may be for us to do.
Turning to the content of these two motions, and again, I am surprised we are having a redo in the House.
Motion No. 2 talks about what is referred to officially as reflection period. What happens in actual fact is that those who request medical assistance in dying, where death is reasonably foreseeable, go through a very long and involved process with their spiritual advisers, their family and with the clinicians who are advising them on the end-of-life issues.
It is important to note that people are not choosing to end their lives when asking for medical assistance in dying. What they are doing is attempting to establish how they will deal with their inevitable death and to maintain their personal autonomy and control over the way that plays out. The New Democrats, in debate on medical assistance in dying, have always stated our priority is to keep in mind that what medical assistance in dying is designed to do is to reduce unnecessary suffering and not unduly prolong that suffering.
It is not just suffering for the patients, although that is one of the qualifications for being able to apply for medical assistance in dying, patients must be suffering intolerably, but also to reduce suffering for the families that are forced to bear witness to the suffering their loved ones are undergoing as they approach end of life.
What we have heard very clearly from those who are assessing and providing medical assistance is dying is that this 10-day period is not really a reflection period. It is a period that is imposed as a waiting period.
When I hear hon. members talk about people changing their minds, we need to look very carefully at what the evidence actually says. Yes, people who apply for medical assistance in dying do sometimes withdraw that request, but they almost always do so during the assessment period. Very few people do so during the waiting period. Of course, at any time they can still withdraw that consent, right up to the last moment.
Medical assessors and providers, as well as families, have said that the real impact of having such a 10-day period is simply to prolong suffering for everyone. When we look at the statistics on when those who applied for medical assistance in dying actually set a date for that assistance to be provided, we find that 50% or more of those are between the 11th and 14th day. In other words, they are being forced to wait out this period before they can assess medical assistance in dying.
It is very important we recognize that we may, and I believe we have, inadvertently prolong suffering through this so-called reflection period. Again, I remind members that we have heard again and again that this is not a snap decision people make; it is a decision that has been well considered with their families, spiritual advisers and with the physicians involved.
Motion No. 3 deals with those whose death is not reasonably foreseeable. It is important we remind ourselves that the condition of death being reasonably foreseeable was, in effect, taken out of medical assistance in dying legislation by the Truchon decision, not by Bill C-7.
The importance of Bill C-7 is that it would establish some special procedures that would be appropriate to those whose death is not reasonably foreseeable. In that case, it set a minimum period for assessment, which was set at 90 days. Again, people are calling this a reflection period. It is not a reflection period. Nor is it a deadline by which medical assistance in dying must be carried out.
The bill would set a minimum time for assessment. If the clinicians and the patient involved believe the assessment should take longer, it can take longer than the 90 days. Therefore, the 90 days is in fact an arbitrary number. I do not think it is reflected in any medical science. Extending that to 120 has that risk, once again, of inadvertently and unintentionally prolonging suffering for those who are at the end of life.
I will not go on too long today, but it is important that we not confuse suicide with medical assistance in dying. Suicide is very serious, and I send my condolences to all those who have lost loved ones.
Medical assistance in dying is not about taking one's own life. It is about the situation when one's life is ending and how one maintains a dignified end to that life and is able to do so without prolonging suffering. We have heard again and again from families and practitioners that no one involved in medical assistance in dying wants anyone to die. They are simply dealing with the realities that medical conditions have presented to them. With that, I will end my comments.
Madame la Présidente, je suis très surpris que nous débattions à nouveau de ces deux motions de l'opposition officielle, alors qu'elles ont été réglées en comité. Sans vouloir revenir sur la décision du Président, je suis un peu préoccupé par la priorité que l'on pourrait accorder à un sujet donné en le déclarant important. Ce faisant, je crains que la présidence ne prête flanc à l'accusation de prendre position sur une question donnée.
Cela dit, je vais maintenant passer à la question qui nous occupe.
Tous les députés ont des convictions sincères concernant la question très importante et difficile de la fin de vie au Canada. Aussi difficile que cela puisse être, il faut prendre garde à ne pas prêter de motifs aux autres députés.
Pour en revenir au contenu des deux motions, je m'étonne — comme je l'ai dit — que nous en discutions à nouveau.
La motion M-2 parle de ce que l'on appelle officiellement la période de réflexion. En fait, les personnes qui demandent l'aide médicale à mourir, lorsque la mort est raisonnablement prévisible, passent par un processus très long et complexe avec leurs conseillers spirituels, leur famille et les cliniciens qui les conseillent sur les questions de fin de vie.
Il est important de souligner que les personnes qui demandent l'aide médicale à mourir ne choisissent pas de mettre fin à leurs jours. Elles cherchent plutôt à établir comment elles souhaitent composer avec leur mort inévitable tout en maintenant leur autonomie personnelle et en ayant leur mot à dire sur la façon dont les choses se dérouleront. Pendant les débats sur l'aide médicale à mourir, les néo-démocrates rappellent toujours leur priorité, c'est-à-dire qu'il faut garder à l'esprit que l'aide médicale à mourir est conçue pour réduire la souffrance inutile et ne pas la prolonger indûment.
Cette souffrance ne touche pas que les patients, bien qu'une souffrance intolérable soit l'un des critères d'admissibilité à l'aide médicale à mourir. Il faut aussi penser à la souffrance des familles forcées de voir un être cher souffrir quand ses derniers jours approchent.
Les professionnels qui évaluent les demandes d'aide médicale à mourir et fournissent cette aide nous ont dit très clairement que cette période de 10 jours n'est pas vraiment une période de réflexion. C'est plutôt une période d'attente imposée.
Quand des députés parlent de gens qui ont changé d'idée, il faut examiner attentivement ce que disent réellement les données probantes. Oui, il arrive que des personnes annulent une demande d'aide médicale à mourir après l'avoir présentée, mais elles le font presque toujours pendant la période d'évaluation. Très peu d'entre elles le font pendant la période d'attente. Cela dit, elles peuvent évidemment retirer leur consentement en tout temps, et ce, jusqu'à la dernière minute.
Selon les évaluateurs et les fournisseurs de services médicaux, de même que les familles, la conséquence réelle de la période d'attente de 10 jours est simplement de prolonger la souffrance de tout le monde. Les statistiques relatives à la date de décès choisie dans les demandes d'aide médicale à mourir montrent qu'au moins 50 % de ces dates se situent entre le 11e et le 14e jour. Autrement dit, les gens sont forcés d'attendre la fin de la période d'attente pour avoir accès à l'aide médicale à mourir.
Il est très important de reconnaître que nous pouvons prolonger par inadvertance la souffrance pendant cette période dite de réflexion, et je crois que nous l'avons fait. Je rappelle aux députés que nous avons entendus à maintes reprises que les gens ne prennent pas cette décision sur un coup de tête; il s'agit d'une décision mûrement réfléchie qui est prise en consultation avec leur famille, leurs conseillers spirituels et les médecins concernés.
La motion no 3 porte sur les personnes dont le décès n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible. Il est important de se rappeler que la condition voulant que la mort soit raisonnablement prévisible a essentiellement été retirée de la loi sur l'aide médicale à mourir par la décision Truchon, et non par le projet de loi C-7.
Le projet de loi C-7 est important parce qu'il établira des procédures spéciales appropriées pour les personnes dont le décès n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible. Dans ce cas, il a fixé une période minimale de 90 jours aux fins d'évaluation. Là encore, les gens parlent d'une période de réflexion. Il ne s'agit pas d'une période de réflexion. Il ne s'agit également pas d'un délai dans lequel l'aide médicale à mourir doit être administrée.
Le projet de loi fixera un délai minimal pour l'évaluation. Si les cliniciens et le patient concerné estiment que l'évaluation devrait prendre plus de temps, elle peut durer plus longtemps que les 90 jours prévus. Par conséquent, le délai de 90 jours est un nombre arbitraire. Je ne pense pas qu'il tient compte des sciences médicales. Faire passer ce délai à 120 jours risque, une fois de plus, de prolonger involontairement et par inadvertance la souffrance des personnes en fin de vie.
Je ne parlerai pas trop longtemps aujourd'hui, mais il est important que nous ne confondions pas le suicide avec l'aide médicale à mourir. Le suicide est très grave, et j'offre mes condoléances à tous les gens qui ont perdu des proches.
L'aide médicale à mourir n'a rien à voir avec le suicide. Elle concerne les situations où une personne est en fin de vie et souhaite garder sa dignité jusqu'à la fin et ce, sans prolonger ses souffrances. Les familles et les professionnels l'ont maintes fois répété: personne dans le processus de l'aide médicale à mourir ne souhaite voir quelqu'un mourir. Tous doivent simplement faire face à la réalité des problèmes de santé qu'ils constatent. Sur ce, je conclus mon discours.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 10:59 [p.2613]
Expand
The hon. member will have five minutes of questions after Oral Questions.
Le député aura droit à cinq minutes pour les questions après la période des questions.
Collapse
View Majid Jowhari Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Majid Jowhari Profile
2020-11-27 10:59 [p.2613]
Expand
Madam Speaker, on Saturday, November 21, our office collaborated with the Richmond Hill Lawn Bowling Club to hold a holiday food drive in support of the Richmond Hill Community Food Bank. A team of 20 volunteers led by Ted Pickles braved the cold from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. to help collect 2,500 pounds of food and $2,500 of donations for the food bank.
I want to thank them, the mayor and the councillors for ward 4 and ward 5, who lent their support, as well as Bristol Car and Truck Rentals for providing us with a truck for the donation. The Richmond Hill Community Food Bank has helped over 1,300 clients a month this year and continues to support residents during these difficult times. I encourage all Canadians to donate to their local food bank if they can.
I thank the team of volunteers, Ted, the Richmond Hill Lawn Bowling Club and our community partners for their work in supporting our food bank. I am so proud to represent such an amazing community. I thank Richmond Hill.
Madame la Présidente, le samedi 21 novembre, notre bureau, en collaboration avec le club de boulingrin de Richmond Hill, a organisé une collecte d'aliments au profit de la banque alimentaire communautaire de Richmond Hill. Une équipe de 20 bénévoles menée par Ted Pickles a bravé le froid de 10 heures à 13 heures et recueilli 2 500 livres de denrées et 2 500 $ en dons pour la banque alimentaire.
Je tiens à les remercier, ainsi que le maire et les conseillers des quartiers 4 et 5, qui sont venus donner un coup de main, et Bristol Car and Truck Rentals, qui nous a prêté un camion pour la collecte. La banque alimentaire communautaire de Richmond Hill est venue en aide à plus de 1 300 bénéficiaires par mois cette année et elle continue de soutenir les gens de la région en cette période difficile. J'invite tous les Canadiens à faire des dons aux banques alimentaires de leur région s'ils en ont les moyens.
Je remercie l'équipe de bénévoles, Ted, le club de boulingrin de Richmond Hill et nos partenaires de la région de leurs efforts pour soutenir la banque alimentaire. Je suis très fier de représenter une collectivité aussi formidable. Je remercie Richmond Hill.
Collapse
View Doug Shipley Profile
CPC (ON)
View Doug Shipley Profile
2020-11-27 11:00 [p.2613]
Expand
Madam Speaker, today I rise in the House to recognize the tragic shooting that ultimately took the life of 12-year-old Dante Andreatta. Dante and his mother were walking home after grocery shopping when two gang members started shooting at rivals. Horrifically, Dante was struck in the neck in the crossfire.
The two men charged with the murder have a long history of violent criminal activity. They are not sport shooters, duck hunters or legal firearms owners; they are criminals.
This brazen shooting, which took place in broad daylight, has impacted me greatly. As a father, I cannot imagine the pain Dante's mother, family and the community are going through.
After consultation with a boots-on-the-ground organization, the One by One Movement, we have learned there is a gang war raging in Toronto. However, the Prime Minister is waging his own war on legal firearms owners.
Community groups are begging for resources and to be heard. When will the Prime Minister step up for this family and this community?
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole aujourd'hui pour souligner la tragique fusillade qui a coûté la vie à Dante Andreatta, un enfant de 12 ans. Dante et sa mère rentraient chez eux à pied après avoir fait des courses lorsque deux membres d'un gang criminel ont commencé à tirer sur les membres d'un gang rival. Dante a été pris dans le feu croisé, il a reçu une balle dans le cou et il est mort d'une horrible façon.
Les deux hommes accusés de cet homicide ont de longs antécédents de crimes violents. Il ne s'agit pas de tireurs sportifs, de chasseurs de canards ni de propriétaires légitimes d'armes à feu; ce sont des criminels.
Cette fusillade révoltante, qui s'est déroulée en plein jour, m'a beaucoup marqué. En tant que père, je peux à peine imaginer la souffrance que doit vivre la mère de Dante, sa famille et sa communauté.
Après avoir consulté un organisme présent sur le terrain, le One by One Movement, nous avons appris qu'une guerre de gangs fait rage à Toronto. Or, pendant ce temps, le premier ministre mène sa propre guerre contre les propriétaires légitimes d'armes à feu.
Des groupes communautaires tentent d'obtenir davantage de ressources et souhaitent qu'on les écoute. Qu'attend le premier ministre pour défendre les intérêts de cette famille et de cette communauté?
Collapse
View Marwan Tabbara Profile
Ind. (ON)
View Marwan Tabbara Profile
2020-11-27 11:01 [p.2613]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the United Nations General Assembly will meet on December 2 to vote in the matter of the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people, including their right to self-determination. Israel and Palestine have been embroiled in a conflict for over 72 years and have faced numerous failed peace negotiations.
There are many major factors standing in the way of a two-state solution and the creation of a Palestinian state. Grievances need to be acknowledged and peace must be made the main focus. Israel's allies, like Canada, need to make it increasingly clear that continued support for Israel is contingent on its willingness to enter serious negotiations.
The House should be supporting the government and an overwhelming majority of other countries in intensifying and broadening its support for pro-Palestinian resolutions.
Madame la Présidente, l'Assemblée générale des Nations unies se réunira le 2 décembre pour se prononcer sur la question des droits inaliénables du peuple palestinien, y compris son droit à l'autodétermination. Israël et la Palestine sont engagés dans un conflit depuis plus de 72 ans, et ont été confrontés à de nombreux échecs lors de négociations de paix.
Bon nombre de facteurs majeurs nuisent à une solution à deux États et à la création d'un État palestinien. Les griefs doivent être reconnus et l'instauration de la paix doit figurer au centre des préoccupations. Les alliés d'Israël, comme le Canada, doivent faire savoir de plus en plus clairement que le soutien continu à Israël dépend de sa volonté de participer à un processus sérieux de négociations.
La Chambre devrait appuyer le gouvernement et une grande majorité d'autres pays en intensifiant et en élargissant son soutien aux résolutions pro-palestiniennes.
Collapse
View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
View René Arseneault Profile
2020-11-27 11:02 [p.2613]
Expand
Madam Speaker, on November 21, the Edmundston and Upper Madawaska chambers of commerce held the 2020 SME Gala to mark small business week.
It was a successful evening that made it possible to honour, even in times of pandemic, entrepreneurs and companies.
Here are the winners in each category. Northwest Plumbing and Heating Inc. won the young entrepreneur award. Bobby's Car Wash and Auto Sales Inc. won the highest merit award. Frontière FM radio won the innovation award. Jack & Jill Pools won the evolution award. Hermance Laplante Alliance Realty won the civic engagement award. EMS Group won the Samuel E. Burpee award. Dr Aucoin Dentisterie intégrale won the entrepreneurial spirit award. Janel Ouellet Design won the Bâtisseur Louis-Philippe Nadeau award. Waska won the business of the year award.
I want to congratulate all these dynamic northwestern New Brunswick businesses for their outstanding work, even in a pandemic.
Madame la Présidente, le 21 novembre dernier, on soulignait la Semaine de la petite entreprise lors du Gala de la PME 2020, organisé entre autres par la Chambre de commerce de la région d'Edmundston et celle du Haut-Madawaska.
Ce fut une soirée mémorable lors de laquelle, même en pleine pandémie, nous avons pu rendre hommage à des entrepreneurs et à des commerces.
Les lauréats sont les suivants: Northwest Plumbing and Heating Inc a remporté le Prix Jeunes entrepreneurs; le Prix Haut-Mérite a été attribué à Bobby's Car Wash and Auto Sales Inc.; radio Frontière FM a reçu la Mention Innovation; la Mention Évolution, quant à elle, a été remise à Piscines Jack & Jill; la Mention Implication communautaire a été donnée à Hermance Laplante Alliance Realty; le Groupe EMS a remporté le Prix Samuel E. Burpee; la Mention Dynamisme entrepreneurial a été accordée à Dr Aucoin Dentisterie intégrale; le Prix Bâtisseur Louis-Philippe Nadeau a été remis à Janel Ouellet Design; et Waska a reçu le Prix Entreprise de l'année.
J'offre mes félicitations à toutes ces entreprises dynamiques de la région du Nord-Ouest du Nouveau-Brunswick, qui ont su se démarquer, et ce, même en temps de pandémie.
Collapse
View Jenny Kwan Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jenny Kwan Profile
2020-11-27 11:03 [p.2614]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the Minister of Health said she has the highest regard for Dr. Patricia Daly, Dr. Bonnie Henry and Mayor Kennedy Stewart. Why, then, has the minister refused to follow their sound advice and decriminalize simple drug possession to help save lives?
In B.C. alone, 1,386 people have died from overdose. Across the country, over 16,000 people have been taken by the war on drugs. The Downtown Eastside is under siege, with record overdose deaths, and it now has the highest COVID-19 infection rates in the city. Our communities are also grappling with the largest homeless encampments in the country.
We need urgent help from the federal government. Vancouver's city council is calling on the government to decriminalize, and the province wants the federal government to cost-share, fifty-fifty, in its aggressive pandemic housing plan to house the homeless. Housing advocates want the port to stand down and not pursue civil proceedings against those who acted in solidarity with the people—
Madame la Présidente, la ministre de la Santé a dit qu'elle tient en haute estime les Dres Patricia Daly et Bonnie Henry ainsi que le maire Kennedy Stewart. Pourquoi la ministre refuse-t-elle alors d'accéder à leur suggestion avisée de décriminaliser la possession simple de drogues afin d'aider à sauver des vies?
La Colombie-Britannique enregistre à elle seule 1 386 décès par surdose. À l'échelle du pays, plus de 16 000 personnes ont perdu la vie en raison de cette guerre contre la drogue. Le Downtown Eastside fait face non seulement à un nombre record de décès par surdose, mais aussi au plus haut taux d'infection à la COVID-19 de toute la ville. Nos collectivités doivent aussi composer avec les plus gros campements de sans-abri au Canada.
Nous avons besoin d'aide de toute urgence de la part du gouvernement fédéral. Le conseil municipal de Vancouver exhorte le gouvernement à décriminaliser les drogues, et la province appelle le gouvernement fédéral à partager les coûts à parts égales dans le cadre de son plan d'hébergement d'urgence pour contrer l'itinérance durant la pandémie. Les défenseurs du droit au logement demandent à l'Administration portuaire de Vancouver de changer son fusil d'épaule et de ne pas entamer de poursuites judiciaires contre les personnes qui ont manifesté leur solidarité à l'égard de ceux...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 11:04 [p.2614]
Expand
The hon. member for Labrador.
La députée de Labrador a la parole.
Collapse
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2020-11-27 11:05 [p.2614]
Expand
Madam Speaker, northerners have shown incredible strength and resilience in protecting their communities and loved ones from COVID-19. As cases continue to rise in Nunavut, we have heard the call from the Government of Nunavut, Inuit partners and community organizations for additional federal support—
Madame la Présidente, les habitants du Nord ont fait preuve d'une force et d'une résilience incroyables pour protéger leur collectivité et leurs proches contre la COVID-19. Dans le contexte de l'augmentation des cas au Nunavut, nous prenons acte du soutien fédéral supplémentaire demandé par le gouvernement territorial, les partenaires inuits et les organismes communautaires...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 11:05 [p.2614]
Expand
The hon. member for Gaspésie—Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine on a point of order.
L'honorable députée de Gaspésie—Les Île-de-la-Madeleine invoque le Règlement.
Collapse
View Diane Lebouthillier Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Speaker, I would ask my colleague to use her headset, since we are not getting the French interpretation. We do not understand what she is saying.
Madame la Présidente, je demanderais à ma collègue de mettre ses écouteurs, parce que l'interprétation en français ne peut pas se faire. Nous ne comprenons pas ce qu'elle dit.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 11:06 [p.2614]
Expand
Could the hon. member for Labrador please put on her headset so the interpreters can interpret?
La députée de Labrador peut-elle mettre son casque d'écoute afin que les interprètes puissent l'entendre?
Collapse
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2020-11-27 11:06 [p.2614]
Expand
Madam Speaker, unfortunately, my headset is not available. With consent, I will continue.
Madame la Présidente, malheureusement, je n'ai pas mon casque d'écoute. Avec le consentement de la Chambre, je vais poursuivre ma déclaration.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 11:06 [p.2614]
Expand
Does the hon. member have the consent of the House to continue?
An hon. member: No.
L'honorable députée a-t-elle le consentement de la Chambre pour poursuivre?
Une voix: Non.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 11:06 [p.2614]
Expand
I am sorry but there is no consent. We have to have interpretation for oral statements.
The hon. member for Calgary Shepard.
Je suis désolée, mais il n'y a pas de consentement. Les déclarations orales doivent être interprétées.
Le député de Calgary Shepard a la parole.
Collapse
View Tom Kmiec Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tom Kmiec Profile
2020-11-27 11:07 [p.2614]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the COVID-19 pandemic is serious. Compared with the Hong Kong flu in the late 1960s, COVID-19 has resulted in almost three times as many deaths.
This pandemic affects more than just our physical well-being. April to June saw 302 opioid-related deaths in Alberta, a 43% increase from the height of the opioid crisis in 2018.
A university study suggests the socio-economic upheaval surrounding the virus could result in over 2,100 more suicide deaths, above the Canadian average, by the end of 2021. The rising toll of suicides, marital breakdowns and spousal abuse must give pause to every decision-maker when looking at new restrictions and considering lockdowns. All factors need to be considered when choosing strategies to end this pandemic, including social wellness, mental health and economic survival.
My constituents are worried that the infringement on our constitutionally guaranteed rights, both big and small, by governments is not being offset by real, substantive gains that end the pandemic. We cannot continue this way forever.
Madame la Présidente, la pandémie de COVID-19 est grave. Comparativement à la pandémie de grippe survenue à Hong Kong à la fin des années 1960, la COVID-19 a causé près de trois fois plus de morts.
La pandémie ne touche pas seulement notre bien-être physique. D'avril à juin, 302 décès liés aux opioïdes sont survenus en Alberta, soit 43 % de plus qu'au plus fort de la crise des opioïdes en 2018.
Selon une étude universitaire, les bouleversements socioéconomiques entourant le virus pourraient entraîner plus de 2 100 suicides supplémentaires d'ici la fin de 2021, ce qui est au-dessus de la moyenne canadienne. L'augmentation du nombre de suicides ainsi que les ruptures et la violence conjugales doivent susciter une réflexion chez tous les décideurs lorsqu'ils examinent de nouvelles restrictions ou envisagent un confinement. Il faut tenir compte de tous les facteurs quand on choisit des stratégies pour mettre fin à la pandémie, y compris le bien-être, la santé mentale et la survie économique.
Mes concitoyens craignent que les atteintes portées par les gouvernements aux droits garantis par la Constitution, qu'elles soient sévères ou légères, ne soient pas compensées par des gains réels importants qui permettent de mettre fin à la pandémie. Nous ne pouvons pas continuer ainsi éternellement.
Collapse
View Soraya Martinez Ferrada Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Soraya Martinez Ferrada Profile
2020-11-27 11:08 [p.2615]
Expand
Madam Speaker, Hochelaga is at the heart of Montreal East.
This vast part of Montreal has a long industrial past. Several million square feet of land are contaminated, and there is a desperate need for transportation infrastructure. However, we in the east end strongly believe that this area is a hub for future economic, social and environmental development, the kind of development that acknowledges the importance of fighting climate change.
To successfully revitalize Montreal East, we must take environmental action, such as decontaminating the soil, developing public transit, encouraging the creation of businesses that support the circular economy, and more.
Last week, our government introduced the Canadian net-zero emissions accountability act. This bill will ensure that the government will be accountable to Canadians with respect to environmental targets. It will take many years to realize the full potential of Montreal East, but I am committed to working with all stakeholders to achieve this.
Madame la Présidente, Hochelaga est au cœur de l'Est de Montréal.
Ce vaste territoire de Montréal a un lourd passé industriel: plusieurs millions de pieds carrés de terrain sont contaminés et il y a un manque criant de transports structurants. Cependant, nous, dans l'Est, sommes convaincus que ce territoire est un pôle de développement économique social et environnemental d'avenir, un développement qui respecte l'importance de combattre les changements climatiques.
Pour réussir la revitalisation de l'Est de Montréal, nous devons prendre des actions environnementales, entre autres, décontaminer les sols, développer le transport collectif, encourager la construction d'entreprises qui perpétuent l'économie circulaire, et plus encore.
La semaine dernière, notre gouvernement a introduit la Loi canadienne sur la responsabilité en matière de carboneutralité. Ce projet de loi assurera que le gouvernement rende des comptes aux citoyens et aux citoyennes par rapport aux cibles environnementales. Cela prendra plusieurs années pour bien déployer le plein potentiel de l'est et je suis déterminée à travailler avec tous les acteurs pour y arriver.
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2020-11-27 11:09 [p.2615]
Expand
Madam Speaker, during Joseph Stalin's Russian regime in 1932-33, he forced starvation upon the Ukrainian people. That genocide has become recognized as the Holodomor.
When we look at the 1.3 million Canadians of Ukrainian heritage, we get an appreciation of why this is such an important event to remember. Whether people are of Ukrainian heritage or not, the brutal policy of starving people as a form of genocide is horrific. Children having to go into fields looking for food were being shot. A population was forced to eat roots and rats. All kinds of things of a horrific nature took place.
In Canada, we recognize the fourth Saturday of November as a time to reflect on that horrific incident and remember it.
Madame la Présidente, en 1932 et 1933, Joseph Staline était à la tête de la Russie et, pendant ces deux années, il a poussé le peuple ukrainien à la famine. C'est ce génocide que l'on appelle aujourd'hui l'Holodomor.
Quand on sait que 1,3 million de Canadiens sont d'origine ukrainienne, on comprend pourquoi cet événement doit absolument être commémoré. Qu'on soit ukrainien ou pas, cela ne change rien à la cruauté de quiconque essaie d'exterminer un peuple en le faisant mourir de faim. Les enfants qui s'aventuraient dans les champs afin d'y trouver de quoi manger étaient abattus d'une balle. La population était réduite à se nourrir de racines et de rats. Toutes sortes d'actes plus terribles les uns que les autres ont marqué cette période.
Au Canada, le quatrième samedi de novembre sert à méditer sur ce chapitre sombre de l'histoire et à le commémorer.
Collapse
View Joël Godin Profile
CPC (QC)
View Joël Godin Profile
2020-11-27 11:10 [p.2615]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to ask this government's Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food to pay just a little attention to the people who work every day to feed Canadians.
Farmers are the lifeblood of many of our rural communities. They have given a lot and we need to respect them. The Liberal government has made some fine promises to buy their silence and get them to agree to the concessions made during the most recent trade agreement negotiations. Now, it is time to provide the timeline for the promised payments to all eligible farmers and agriculture processors. That is the least this government can do to recognize the importance of the men and women who work in this critical sector of our economy.
Supply management must be protected, and our leader has committed to never use supply management as a bargaining chip in future negotiations. Enough is enough. Why put these business owners through that kind of stress? When someone is just trying to give the impression that they respect a group, they act like the Minister of Agriculture is acting. They are evasive and change the rules of the game.
I am asking the Minister of Agriculture to stop playing cat and mouse and to show respect for our farmers by keeping her word.
Madame la Présidente, j'aimerais demander à la ministre de l'Agriculture et de l'Agroalimentaire du gouvernement actuel de porter un minimum d'attention aux gens qui travaillent au quotidien pour nourrir les citoyens canadiens.
Les agriculteurs sont le poumon de plusieurs de nos communautés rurales. Ils ont beaucoup donné et on se doit de les respecter. Le gouvernement libéral a fait de bien belles promesses, afin d'acheter leur silence et de faire accepter les dernières concessions faites lors des négociations d'entente commerciale. Maintenant, il est temps de déposer le calendrier des versements promis à tous les producteurs et transformateurs du monde agricole qui y ont droit. C'est le minimum que ce gouvernement doit faire afin de reconnaître l'importance des hommes et des femmes de ce secteur vital de notre économie.
La gestion de l'offre doit être protégée et notre chef s'est engagé à ne pas utiliser cet élément dans les négociations futures. Assez, c'est assez. Pourquoi faire subir cette anxiété à ces entrepreneurs? Lorsque l'on donne l'illusion de respecter un groupe, on agit comme la ministre de l'Agriculture, on est évasif et on change les règles du jeu.
Je demande à la ministre de l'Agriculture d'arrêter de jouer au chat et à la souris et de respecter sa parole et surtout nos producteurs agricoles.
Collapse
View Greg Fergus Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Greg Fergus Profile
2020-11-27 11:11 [p.2615]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the first snowfall heralded an abrupt start to winter and people are beginning to prepare for the upcoming holiday season.
That is a good thing for the Old Aylmer Christmas Market, which has a warm and lively experience in store for shoppers in this its seventh year of operation. I want to commend the organizers for their dedication and creativity. They have done a great job making this year's market even more magical than ever while following the public health guidelines.
This is an opportunity to buy local and stock up on products from Outaouais farmers and artisans.
For 27 years now, the Christmas festivities in Aylmer have been an opportunity for the community to come together and showcase the contributions of volunteers. Although the Santa Claus parade must be cancelled this year, the Old Aylmer Christmas Market will still be held. It supports local farmers, producers and artisans.
I invite all to come and enjoy Aylmer's natural beauty and heritage.
Madame la Présidente, la première neige vient brusquement de nous plonger dans l'hiver, et tous les préparatifs pour la saison à venir s'enclenchent.
Cela fait le bonheur du Marché de Noël du Vieux-Aylmer, qui nous prépare une expérience chaleureuse et animée pour sa septième année. Je félicite les organisateurs pour leur dévouement et leur créativité. Ils nous offrent un événement encore une fois féérique, et qui respecte les consignes de santé publique. C'est du beau travail!
Ce sera l'occasion de soutenir l'achat local et de s'approvisionner auprès de nos fermiers et de nos artisans de l'Outaouais.
Depuis maintenant 27 ans, les festivités organisées à Aylmer à l'occasion de Noël permettent de se rassembler et de mettre en lumière les réalisations des bénévoles de la région. Le défilé du père Noël a peut-être été annulé cette année, mais le Marché de Noël du Vieux-Aylmer aura lieu malgré tout. Soutenons les agriculteurs, les producteurs et les artisans d'ici.
J'invite tous les Canadiens à venir profiter du cadre enchanteur et historique d'Aylmer.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 11:12 [p.2615]
Expand
The hon. member for Kildonan—St. Paul.
La députée de Kildonan—St. Paul a la parole.
Collapse
View Raquel Dancho Profile
CPC (MB)
View Raquel Dancho Profile
2020-11-27 11:12 [p.2615]
Expand
Madam Speaker, as the fall economic update draws near, I want to draw the attention of the Minister of Finance to the health and economic well-being of Canadian women who have been hit hardest by the pandemic. In fact, Canada is one of the few countries in the world where women account for a greater proportion of both COVID-19 cases and deaths than men.
The economic impact of the pandemic on Canadian women has also been severe, and the ongoing mismanagement by the current Liberal government will continue to hamper Canada's economic recovery. The failure of the Prime Minister to enact a comprehensive plan to protect jobs that predominantly employ women has led to more than 20,000 women leaving the workforce altogether. The proportion of women working in Canada now is at its lowest level in 30 years, which is as long as I have been alive. It is quite incredible.
The biggest obstacle to the economic success of women in Canada, and in my riding, is the availability of the vaccine so that the economy can return to normal. Canadian women deserve to know when the vaccine will be available to them and their loved ones. They need to plan.
I am hopeful the Minister of Finance will include a detailed—
Madame la Présidente, à l'approche de la mise à jour économique de l'automne, je veux attirer l'attention de la ministre des Finances sur la santé et le bien-être économique des Canadiennes, qui ont été les plus durement touchées par la pandémie. En fait, le Canada est l'un des quelques pays du monde où les femmes représentent une plus grande proportion des cas et des décès liés à la COVID-19 que les hommes.
Les répercussions économiques de la pandémie ont également fortement touché les Canadiennes, et l'incurie persistante du gouvernement libéral actuel continuera à nuire à la relance économique. En l'absence de plan exhaustif que le premier ministre aurait pu mettre en place pour protéger les emplois qui sont principalement occupés par des femmes, plus de 20 000 femmes ont carrément quitté le marché du travail. La proportion de femmes qui travaillent au Canada a atteint son niveau le plus bas en 30 ans, soit depuis que je suis née. C'est ahurissant.
Le principal obstacle au succès économique des femmes au Canada, et dans ma circonscription, c'est l'absence de vaccins qui permettraient à l'économie de revenir à la normale. Les Canadiennes méritent de savoir quand les vaccins seront disponibles pour leurs proches et pour elles-mêmes. Elles doivent penser à l'avenir.
J'espère que la ministre des Finances inclura un plan détaillé...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 11:13 [p.2616]
Expand
The hon. member for Louis-Saint-Laurent.
Le député de Louis-Saint-Laurent a la parole.
Collapse
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-11-27 11:13 [p.2616]
Expand
Madam Speaker, four years ago, six Canadians were murdered at the Quebec City mosque. The murderer was sentenced to 40 years in prison without parole, which is what the law allows for in the case of multiple murders.
Yesterday, the Quebec Court of Appeal reduced that sentence to 25 years. The president of the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec City said:
It's a sad day...It's not enough...he can get out in 25 years with good behaviour...but the people who died are gone, they will never come back.
The consecutive sentencing provision for multiple murders was enacted in a law passed in 2011. This is not a Conservative law. Yes, it was passed by our government, but it has remained in force for five years under the Liberal government. The appeal court judges called this law absurd, heinous and cruel.
In our mind, what is absurd, heinous and cruel is for six Muslim Canadians to gather at the Quebec City mosque and be murdered by a criminal.
Madame la Présidente, il y a quatre ans, six Canadiens ont été assassinés à la mosquée de Québec. L'assassin a été condamné, tel que le permet la loi en cas de meurtres multiples, à 40 ans de prison ferme avant une possible libération conditionnelle.
Hier, la Cour d'appel du Québec a réduit cette peine à 25 ans. Le président du Centre islamique de Québec a dit:
C’est un triste jour. [...] C’est comme s’il n’avait rien là. […] Mais il peut se tenir à carreau et dans 25 ans il va sortir [... ] Sauf que ceux qui sont morts ils sont partis, ils ne reviendront jamais.
La mesure sur le cumul de peines en cas de meurtres multiples a été adoptée par une loi votée en 2011. Cette loi n'est pas une loi conservatrice. Oui, elle a été adoptée par notre gouvernement, mais elle est maintenue en place depuis cinq ans par le gouvernement libéral. Les juges de la Cour d'appel ont qualifié cette loi avec ces mots: absurde, odieux, cruel.
Pour nous, ce qui est absurde, odieux et cruel, c'est la mort de six Canadiens musulmans rassemblés à la mosquée de Québec et assassinés par un criminel.
Collapse
View Alistair MacGregor Profile
NDP (BC)
View Alistair MacGregor Profile
2020-11-27 11:15 [p.2616]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the coastal waters of southern Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands are truly beautiful and home to a vast array of life and delicate marine ecosystems. They are among the most diverse in the world's temperate waters and offer fantastic recreation opportunities, including scuba diving, whale-watching, sea kayaking and coastal cruising.
For untold centuries, these waters have supported vibrant first nations coastal communities and continue to do so today. Unfortunately, the natural beauty of this area is under threat from the presence of large freighters that are using our waters as an overflow industrial parking lot for the Port of Vancouver.
At the same time, the federal government is actively pursuing the establishment of a national marine conservation area here. If the Liberals truly believe in the work to establish this NMCA, I urge them to support my bill, Bill C-250, which amends the Canada Shipping Act to prohibit freighters from anchoring in these waters.
Madame la Présidente, les eaux côtières du sud de l'île de Vancouver et des îles du Gulf sont vraiment magnifiques et abritent un vaste éventail de vie sauvage et d'écosystèmes marins fragiles, qui sont parmi les plus diversifiés des eaux tempérées du monde. Ils offrent de fantastiques occasions de loisirs, notamment pour les amateurs de la plongée sous-marine, de l'observation des baleines, du kayak de mer et des croisières côtières.
Depuis des temps immémoriaux, ces eaux ont soutenu de dynamiques communautés côtières de Premières Nations, et c'est encore le cas aujourd'hui. Malheureusement, la beauté naturelle de cette région est menacée par la présence de grands cargos qui se servent de nos eaux comme d'un stationnement de zone industrielle en attendant de pouvoir accoster au port de Vancouver.
En même temps, le gouvernement fédéral prend activement des mesures en vue d'y créer une aire marine nationale de conservation. Si les libéraux pensent sincèrement établir cette aire marine nationale de conservation, je les encourage fortement à appuyer mon projet de loi, le projet de loi C-250, qui vise à modifier la Loi de 2001 sur la marine marchande du Canada pour interdire aux bâtiments de mouiller dans ces eaux.
Collapse
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2020-11-27 11:15 [p.2616]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to note that November is social economy month.
To my colleagues from other provinces who are not so familiar with this concept, since it is another thing specific to Quebec, the social economy is about co-operatives, not-for-profit organizations, and collective and inclusive entrepreneurship in service of the community.
It is about courageous people coming together to serve the people in their community, their fellow citizens. It is about the 22 centres playing a pivotal role in Quebec's economic development and an even bigger role outside the major urban centres.
The social economy refers to 11,200 businesses that generate $48 billion in revenues. It refers to 220,000 employees and 269,000 volunteers who stimulate an economy of proximity that is 100% Quebec based, with spinoffs that are 100% local.
On behalf of the Bloc Québécois, I want to thank all those people for their initiatives, their creativity, and their commitment to their community. I hope they continue to innovate together. Long live the social economy—
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à souligner que, novembre, c'est le Mois de l'économie sociale.
Pour mes collègues des autres provinces qui connaissent moins cela, puisque c'est une autre spécificité québécoise, il s'agit de coopératives, d'organismes à but non lucratif, d'entrepreneuriat collectif et inclusif au service de la communauté.
Ce sont des gens courageux qui s'unissent pour servir les gens de leur milieu, leurs concitoyens. Ce sont 22 pôles au cœur du développement économique du Québec, qui jouent un rôle encore plus important hors des grands centres.
L'économie sociale, c'est 11 200 entreprises qui génèrent 48 milliards de dollars de revenus, c'est 220 000 employés et 269 000 bénévoles qui stimulent une économie de proximité à 100 % québécoise et aux retombées à 100 % locales.
Je veux dire à toutes ces personnes, au nom du Bloc québécois, merci pour vos initiatives, merci pour votre créativité, merci pour votre engagement envers votre communauté. Continuez d'innover ensemble. Longue vie à l'économie...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2020-11-27 11:16 [p.2616]
Expand
The hon. member for Haldimand—Norfolk.
L'honorable députée de Haldimand—Norfolk a la parole.
Collapse
View Diane Finley Profile
CPC (ON)
View Diane Finley Profile
2020-11-27 11:16 [p.2616]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I rise today to honour the Deans of the Conservative Caucus: the member for Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke and the member for Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston. They both are celebrating the 20th anniversary of their elections to this great chamber.
These two members have always been steadfast in their dedication: one to good governance and Constitution matters, the other to our Canadian military and common sense. I can say first-hand that they both approach their jobs today with the same passion and conviction as they did when I first met them, over 16 years ago. They both remain fearless when it comes to voicing their and their constituents' views.
I invite the House to join me in thanking and congratulating these two hon. members for a combined 40 years of service to our great country.
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole aujourd'hui pour rendre hommage aux doyens du caucus conservateur: la députée de Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke et le député de Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston. Ils fêtent tous les deux le 20e anniversaire de leur élection comme député siégeant dans cette grande enceinte.
Ces deux députés se sont toujours donnés à leur travail: l'une s'est dévouée à la bonne gouvernance et aux questions constitutionnelles, l'autre à l'armée canadienne et au gros bon sens. Je peux affirmer en toute connaissance de cause qu'ils font leur travail avec autant de passion et de conviction que lorsque je les ai rencontrés pour la première fois, il y a plus de 16 ans. Ils sont tous les deux aussi courageux que jamais lorsqu'ils présentent leur point de vue et celui de leurs électeurs.
J'invite la Chambre à se joindre à moi pour remercier et féliciter ces deux députés de leurs 20 années à servir notre grand pays.
Collapse
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Judy A. Sgro Profile
2020-11-27 11:18 [p.2617]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to celebrate the life of a remarkable man, Master Corporal Derek Selleck. Derek served as a loyal member of the Canadian Armed Forces for over 20 years. He was a recipient of numerous awards and recognitions, including the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal. He served his country valiantly, as well as his community.
Humber River—Black Creek was where Derek called home. It is where he founded a multicultural women's organization that empowers women from all cultural backgrounds through sport, specifically soccer.
He was a selfless, generous man, who was proud of his legacy in the Armed Forces. My thoughts and prayers go out to his family, his brothers and sisters, and to all the community who have suffered a significant loss.
Madame la Présidente, je profite de l'occasion pour honorer la mémoire d'un homme remarquable, le caporal-chef Derek Selleck, qui a servi loyalement dans les Forces armées canadiennes pendant plus de 20 ans. Il a reçu de nombreuses médailles et de nombreux honneurs, dont la Médaille du jubilé de diamant de la reine. Il a servi son pays vaillamment, ainsi que sa collectivité.
M. Selleck s'est établi dans Humber River—Black Creek. C'est là qu'il a fondé une organisation féminine multiculturelle qui autonomise les femmes de tous les milieux culturels par le sport, en particulier le soccer.
C'était un homme désintéressé et généreux qui était fier de la marque qu'il avait laissée dans les forces armées. Mes pensées et mes prières accompagnent sa famille, ses frères et sœurs, et toute la communauté qui a subi une perte importante.
Collapse
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-11-27 11:19 [p.2617]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the murderer who killed six Canadians at the Quebec City mosque four years ago had his sentence reduced from 40 years to 25 years. The Quebec Court of Appeal rendered that decision yesterday. The court found the law allowing for consecutive sentences unconstitutional.
That law was passed by the previous Conservative government and has been upheld by the current Liberal government for the past five years. This law is a Canadian law. We fervently hope the Attorney General of Quebec will appeal the ruling to the Supreme Court.
What does the government think?
Madame la Présidente, le meurtrier qui a assassiné six Canadiens à la mosquée de Québec il y a quatre ans a vu sa peine passer de 40 ans à 25 ans. C'est la Cour d'appel du Québec qui a rendu cette décision hier. Pour la Cour, la loi qui permet le cumul des peines est inconstitutionnelle.
Cette loi a été adoptée par le précédent gouvernement conservateur et maintenue depuis cinq ans par l'actuel gouvernement libéral. Cette loi est une loi canadienne. Nous souhaitons ardemment que le procureur général du Québec porte la cause en appel auprès de la Cour suprême.
Qu'en pense le gouvernement?
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-11-27 11:19 [p.2617]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I rise today as the parliamentary secretary, but also a Muslim Canadian member of this chamber. This decision will rekindle a great deal of hurt and anger among those who were affected by this terrible crime, including people like me in this chamber, as well the victims, their families, their friends, and people in Quebec and across the country.
Important questions are raised by this judgement, and we are going to examine this judgement fully. Our thoughts remain with the families and with the survivors. We have stood with them throughout, and we will continue to support them through this awful tragedy.
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole aujourd'hui non seulement en tant que secrétaire parlementaire, mais aussi en tant que député canadien musulman. Cette décision ravivera beaucoup de douleur et de colère chez les gens qui ont été touchés par ce terrible crime, y compris des personnes comme moi dans cette enceinte, ainsi que les victimes, leurs familles, leurs amis et des gens du Québec et de tout le Canada.
C'est une décision qui soulève des questions importantes, et nous allons l'examiner en détail. Les familles et les survivants demeurent dans nos pensées. Nous leur avons accordé notre soutien tout au long de ces événements et nous continuerons de les aider à surmonter cette terrible tragédie.
Collapse
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-11-27 11:20 [p.2617]
Expand
Madam Speaker, Canadians are unfortunately at the back of the pack when it comes to COVID-19.
The government was late in closing the borders. The government was late when it came to rapid tests, and now the government is late on vaccines.
I have a simple question for the government. When will Canadians be able to get the vaccine?
Madame la Présidente, les Canadiens sont malheureusement en queue de peloton quand il s'agit de la COVID-19.
Le gouvernement a tardé concernant la fermeture des frontières. Le gouvernement a tardé concernant les tests rapides et, actuellement, le gouvernement tarde concernant les vaccins.
J'ai une question toute simple pour le gouvernement: quand les Canadiens auront-ils droit au vaccin?
Collapse
View Steven MacKinnon Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Steven MacKinnon Profile
2020-11-27 11:21 [p.2617]
Expand
Madam Speaker, let's be very clear.
Every Canadian who chooses to be vaccinated will have access to a vaccine. This government has taken a dynamic, responsible approach to acquiring vaccines. We now have the best, most diverse portfolio of vaccines in the world. We have also laid the foundation for a distribution and logistics system, and we have been working with the provinces day and night since May to deploy it.
We will make sure that, when the vaccines are ready, Canada is ready.
Madame la Présidente, soyons très clairs.
Chaque Canadien qui choisira d'être vacciné aura accès à un vaccin. Ce gouvernement a adopté une approche dynamique et responsable pour l'achat de vaccins. Nous avons maintenant le meilleur carnet de commandes de vaccins au monde et le plus diversifié. Nous avons par ailleurs jeté les fondements d'un système de distribution et de logistique et nous travaillons avec les provinces depuis le mois de mai, jour et nuit, sur son déploiement.
Nous nous assurerons que, lorsque les vaccins seront prêts, le Canada sera prêt.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 60 of 12328 | Page: 1 of 206

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data