Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 1 of 1
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2017-11-20 12:05 [p.15267]
moved that:
Bill C-59, An Act respecting national security matters, be referred forthwith to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security.
He said: Madam Speaker, the Government of Canada has no greater responsibility than keeping Canadians safe. We must fulfill that essential and solemn obligation while at the same time safeguarding Canadian rights and freedoms.
This double objective of protecting Canadians while defending their rights and freedoms was the basis of our commitments regarding national security during the last election, and it informed everything we have done in the area since we have been in government.
We have, for example, created a committee of parliamentarians with unprecedented access to classified information to scrutinize the activities of all national security and intelligence agencies. We have launched the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence to help Canada become a world leader in counter-radicalization.
We have issued new ministerial directions that more clearly prohibit conduct that would result in a substantial risk of torture. Our starting point was the most extensive and inclusive consultations about national security ever undertaken by the Government of Canada. Beginning in the spring of 2016, that effort involved individual stakeholders, round tables, town halls, various renowned experts, studies by parliamentary committees, and a broad solicitation of views online. More than 75,000 submissions were received.
All of this fresh input was supplemented by earlier judicial inquires by Iacobucci, O'Connor, and Major, as well as several parliamentary proposals, certain court judgments, and reports from existing national security review bodies. It all helped to shape the legislation before us today, Bill C-59, the national security act of 2017.
The measures in this bill cover three core themes, enhancing accountability and transparency, correcting problematic elements from the former Bill C-51, and updating our national security laws to ensure that our agencies can keep pace with evolving threats.
One of the major advances in this legislation is the creation of the national security and intelligence review agency. This new body, which has been dubbed by some as a "super SIRC", will be mandated to review any activity carried out by any government department that relates to national security and intelligence, as well as any matters referred to it by the government. It will be able to investigate public complaints. It will specifically replace the existing review bodies for CSIS and the Communications Security Establishment, but it will also be authorized to examine security and intelligence activities throughout the government, including the Canada Border Services Agency.
In this day and age, security operations regularly involve multiple departments and agencies. Therefore, effective accountability must not be limited to the silo of one particular institution. Rather, it must follow the trail wherever it leads. It must provide for comprehensive analysis and integrated findings and recommendations. That is exactly what Canadians will get from this new review agency.
Bill C-59 also creates the brand new position of the intelligence commissioner, whose role will be to oversee and approve, or not approve, certain intelligence activities by CSIS and the CSE in advance. The intelligence commissioner will be a retired or supernumerary superior court judge whose decisions will be binding. In other words, if he or she says that a particular proposed operation is unreasonable or inappropriate, it will simply not proceed.
Taken together, the new comprehensive review agency, the intelligence commissioner, and the new committee of parliamentarians will give Canada accountability mechanisms of unprecedented scope and depth. This is something that Canadians have been calling for, and those calls intensified when the former Bill C-51 was introduced. We heard them loud and clear during our consultations, and we are now putting these accountability measures into place.
BillC-59 also brings clarity and rigour to internal government information sharing under the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act, or SCISA. This is the law that allows government institutions to share information with each other in respect of activities that undermine the security of Canada. Among other things, Bill C-59 would change the name of the law, in English, to the security of Canada information disclosure act, to be clear that we are talking only about the disclosure of existing information, not the collection of anything new. Government institutions will now be required to keep specific records of all disclosures made under the act, and to provide these records to the new review agency.
Importantly, Bill C-59 clarifies the definition of activities “that undermine the security of Canada”. For example, it is explicit in stating that advocacy, protest, dissent, and artistic expression are not included. The new legislation would also provide more precision in the definition of “terrorist propaganda”, in line with the well-known criminal offence of counselling.
The paramountcy of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms is an overriding principle in Bill C-59. That is perhaps most evident in the updates that we are proposing to the CSIS Act. This is the law that created CSIS back in 1984, and it has not been modernized in any meaningful way since then.
The former Bill C-51 empowered CSIS to engage in measures to reduce threats to the security of Canada without clearly defining what those measures could and could not include. We are now creating a specific closed list of measures that CSIS will have the authority to take to deal with threats. If any such activity might limit a charter right, CSIS will have to go before a judge. The activity can only be allowed if the judge is satisfied that it is compliant with the charter.
Another concern we heard during the consultations and more generally has been about the no-fly list, especially the problem of false positives, which affects people whose names are similar to listed individuals. This is due to long-standing design flaws in the way that the no-fly list was first created many years ago. Those flaws require legislative, regulatory, and technological changes to fix them.
Bill C-59 includes the necessary legislative changes and paves the way for the others that will be necessary. In essence, Canada's no-fly list currently piggybacks onto the airlines' computer systems, which means that the government does not control the fields to be included nor the way that the whole system works. This bill would give us the authority we need to allow the government, instead of airlines, to screen passenger information against the no-fly list. The people who have been affected by this, especially those with children, feel frustrated and stigmatized by their no-fly problems. That is entirely understandable, and that is why we are working so hard to get this fixed. Passing Bill C-59 is a necessary step toward that end.
There is much more in Bill C-59 than I could possibly deal with in these 10 minutes, but in keeping with the open and inclusive approach that we have taken with this legislation since before it was even drafted, we are sending it to committee before second reading to ensure that the examination of the bill is as thorough as possible.
Professor Craig Forcese, a respected expert in national security law from the University of Ottawa, said Bill C-59 “appears to be more carefully crafted than anything we've seen in this area in a long time..”. I appreciate that, but there is still more work to be done.
I certainly hope to hear ideas and advice from colleagues in the House. We are open to constructive suggestions as we work together to ensure that Canada's national security framework is as strong and effective as it can possibly be.
propose:
Que le projet de loi C-59, Loi concernant des questions de sécurité nationale, soit renvoyé sur-le-champ au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale.
-- Madame la Présidente, la plus importante responsabilité du gouvernement du Canada est d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens. Nous devons nous acquitter de cette obligation essentielle et solennelle tout en protégeant les droits et libertés des Canadiens.
Ce double objectif, protéger les Canadiens et défendre leurs droits et libertés, a sous-tendu nos engagements en matière de sécurité nationale pendant la dernière élection, et il a guidé tout ce que nous avons fait dans ce domaine depuis que nous sommes au gouvernement.
Par exemple, nous avons créé un comité de parlementaires ayant un accès sans précédent à des renseignements classifiés dans le but d'examiner les activités de toutes les agences de sécurité nationale et de tous les services nationaux de renseignement. Nous avons mis sur pied le Centre canadien d'engagement communautaire et de prévention de la violence pour aider le Canada à devenir un chef de file mondial de la lutte contre la radicalisation.
Nous avons publié de nouvelles directives ministérielles qui interdisent plus clairement toute activité susceptible d'entraîner un risque élevé de torture. Les consultations les plus exhaustives et inclusives sur la sécurité nationale jamais entreprises par le gouvernement du Canada constituaient notre point de départ. Cette mesure, qui a été prise au début du printemps de 2016, a nécessité la participation d'intervenants et d'experts reconnus, la tenue de tables rondes et d'assemblées publiques et la réalisation d'études par des comités parlementaires et de vastes sondages d'opinion en ligne. Plus de 75 000 mémoires ont été reçus.
À ces nouvelles idées s'ajoutent les enquêtes judiciaires réalisées précédemment par les juges Iacobucci, O'Connor et Major, ainsi que plusieurs propositions parlementaires, quelques décisions des tribunaux et des rapports produits par des organismes existants d'examen des activités de sécurité nationale. Tout cela a permis de façonner la mesure législative dont nous sommes saisis aujourd'hui, le projet de loi C-59, la Loi de 2017 sur la sécurité nationale.
Les mesures présentées dans ce projet de loi portent sur trois thèmes principaux: accroître la responsabilité et la transparence, corriger les lacunes de l'ancien projet de loi C-51, et mettre à jour les lois nationales en matière de sécurité afin que les agences canadiennes soient en mesure de s'adapter à l'évolution des menaces.
Une des principales avancées que propose le projet de loi est la création de l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Ce nouvel organisme, qualifié par certains de « super CSARS », aura pour mandat d’examiner l’exercice par les ministères de leurs activités liées à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement et d'examiner toute question dont il est saisi par le gouvernement. Il pourra également faire enquête sur les plaintes qu'il recevra du public. Il remplacera les organismes de surveillance du SCRS et du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, mais son mandat s'étendra également aux activités liées à la sécurité et au renseignement dans l'ensemble du gouvernement, y compris à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada.
De nos jours, il est fréquent que de nombreux ministères et organismes doivent collaborer dans les opérations de sécurité. C'est pourquoi la responsabilisation, pour être efficace, ne doit pas être compartimentée et cibler un organisme en particulier. Il faut qu'elle suive chacune des étapes, peu importe qui les effectue. Les examens doivent permettre une analyse complète et produire des résultats et des recommandations intégrés. C'est exactement ce que ce nouvel office de surveillance fera pour les Canadiens.
Le projet de loi C-59 créé également un nouveau poste de commissaire au renseignement, dont le rôle sera de surveiller et de préapprouver ou non certaines activités de renseignement du SCRS et du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Le poste de commissaire au renseignement sera occupé par un juge à la retraite ou un juge surnuméraire d’une cour supérieure, dont les décisions seront exécutoires. Autrement dit, si ce juge détermine qu'une opération donnée est déraisonnable ou inappropriée, elle ne sera simplement pas menée.
Ensemble, le nouvel office de surveillance complète, le commissaire au renseignement et le nouveau comité de parlementaires offriront au Canada des mécanismes de responsabilisation d'une étendue et d'une portée sans précédent. Les Canadiens réclament de telles mesures depuis longtemps, et ces demandes se sont accrues lorsque l'ancien projet de loi C-51 a été présenté. Nous avons bien compris ces demandes lors des consultations, et ce sont ces mesures de responsabilisation que nous mettons présentement en place.
Le projet de loi C-59 apporte également des précisions et de la rigueur en ce qui concerne la communication d'information entre les organismes gouvernementaux aux termes de la Loi sur la communication d’information ayant trait à la sécurité du Canada. Cette loi permet aux organismes gouvernementaux de partager de l'information concernant les activités susceptibles de nuire à la sécurité du Canada. Le projet de loi C-59 modifie notamment le nom de la loi en anglais, qui devient « Security of Canada Information Disclosure Act », afin qu'il soit clair que la divulgation porte uniquement sur de l'information existante, non sur la collecte de nouveaux renseignements. Les institutions gouvernementales seront tenues de conserver des documents concernant les communications effectuées aux termes de la loi et de les présenter au nouvel office de surveillance.
Il importe de noter que le projet de loi C-59 précise la définition d'activités « portant atteinte à la sécurité du Canada ». Par exemple, il dispose explicitement que les activités de défense d’une cause, de protestation, de manifestation d’un désaccord ou d’expression artistique ne sont pas visées. La nouvelle mesure législative précise également la définition de « propagande terroriste » afin qu'elle corresponde à une infraction déjà connue, c'est-à-dire conseiller la commission d’une infraction.
La primauté de la Charte des droits et libertés constitue un principe fondamental du projet de loi C-59. C'est particulièrement évident dans les mises à jour que le gouvernement propose à la Loi sur le SCRS. Cette loi a donné lieu à la création du SCRS en 1984, mais elle n'a pas été modernisée de façon substantielle depuis.
L'ancien projet de loi C-51 donnait au SCRS le pouvoir de prendre des mesures en vue de réduire les menaces à la sécurité du Canada, sans toutefois définir clairement ce que les mesures pouvaient comprendre ou pas. Nous créons actuellement une liste exhaustive de mesures que le SCRS sera autorisé à prendre pour gérer les menaces. Si une activité limite un droit garanti par la Charte, le SCRS devra se présenter devant un juge. L'activité ne sera autorisée que si le juge est convaincu qu'elle est conforme à la Charte.
Une autre préoccupation que nous avons entendue pendant les consultations, notamment, a trait à la liste d'interdiction de vol, tout particulièrement les faux positifs, qui ont une incidence sur les personnes dont le nom est semblable à celui de personnes figurant sur la liste. Cette situation est attribuable à des défauts de conception de longue date, c'est-à-dire depuis la création il y a de nombreuses années de la liste d'interdiction de vol. Des modifications devront être apportées sur les plans législatif, réglementaire et technologique pour y remédier.
Le projet de loi C-59 prévoit les modifications législatives nécessaires et ouvre la voie aux autres modifications qui devront être apportées. En gros, la liste actuelle d'interdiction de vol du Canada se greffe aux systèmes informatiques des compagnies aériennes, ce qui signifie que le gouvernement n'a aucun contrôle sur les champs à inclure ou sur la façon dont l'ensemble du système fonctionne. Le projet de loi donnera au gouvernement, plutôt qu'aux compagnies aériennes, le pouvoir de vérifier les renseignements concernant les passagers en fonction de la liste d'interdiction de vol. Les gens touchés par cette situation, tout particulièrement ceux qui ont des enfants, se sentent frustrés et stigmatisés en raison des problèmes liés à la liste d'interdiction de vol. C'est tout à fait compréhensible, et c'est pourquoi nous ne ménageons aucun effort pour remédier à la situation. L'adoption du projet de loi C-59 est une étape essentielle pour atteindre cet objectif.
Il reste encore beaucoup à dire au sujet du projet de loi C-59, mais je ne dispose que de 10 minutes. Cependant, conformément à l'approche transparente et inclusive que nous avons adoptée à l'égard de cette mesure législative, et ce, avant même qu'elle soit rédigée, nous la renvoyons au comité avant l'étape de la deuxième lecture pour qu'elle fasse l'objet d'un examen le plus exhaustif possible.
Le professeur Craig Forcese, un expert réputé du droit relatif à la sécurité nationale de l'Université d'Ottawa, a déclaré que le projet de loi C-59 semble être plus soigneusement conçu que n'importe quelle autre mesure législative produite depuis fort longtemps dans ce domaine. Je m'en réjouis, mais il reste beaucoup de travail à faire.
J'espère que mes collègues à la Chambre nous feront part de leurs idées et de leurs conseils. Nous sommes ouverts aux suggestions constructives, et nous avons à coeur de travailler en collaboration afin que le cadre de sécurité nationale du Canada soit aussi rigoureux et efficace qu'il peut l'être.
Result: 1 - 1 of 1

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data