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Results: 1 - 30 of 2204
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Dr. Bigland-Pritchard, thanks for all the good work that you're doing in Saskatoon with the Roman Catholic Diocese. We've worked on some cases together, and I know that you've developed a great working relationship with my staff, Daniel, Lisa, Jared and Carol, so that's a great thing.
You spoke to my staff about an Iranian Christian woman and her child who were stuck in refugee limbo in Turkey, as she keeps getting rejected by the IRCC. This is after nine years of indentured slavery by her father to the Iranian revolutionary guard, and finally being raped before she could escape to Turkey.
More generally, we know that minority Christians throughout certain parts of the world are persecuted and live under threat every day. Unfortunately, the Liberals under Trudeau have made their disdain for Christians pretty clear and have basically put up the “do not enter” sign if you are one.
For private refugee sponsorship, which is what you specialize in, can you tell the committee what barriers you see are in place preventing minority Christians from getting fair hearings and getting refugee status in Canada?
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Chair, based on that, I would like to make a notice of motion as follows:
That the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration report the following to the House: that the committee condemns the persecution of minority Christians in all countries; and urges the Canadian government to provide assistance wherever possible to facilitate immigration of such individuals and families into Canada.
We'll distribute the French version of that as well.
You mentioned some systemic problems with immigration and backlogs. When the minister was here a while ago, we asked him about backlogs, and he didn't talk about that. He talked about inventory, business as usual.
In your opinion, what other systemic changes need to be made at the department to clear the ever-growing backlog?
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you. That's good.
I'd like to switch over to Madam Foster with the Hotel Association of Canada.
I know that temporary foreign workers are key to your sector. When you're looking at hoteliers, clerks, housekeepers, etc., these are the back-end jobs at the hotel. Last November, the IRCC told me that the average wait times for all categories of TFWs stretched many months. This can be a whole tourist season in your industry.
Can you tell me if the situation for temporary foreign workers has improved, or has it become worse in the last 12 months?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
I'm going to go back to the Saskatchewan Weekly Newspapers Association, if you don't mind.
You represent 56 members. You do know that with Bill C-18 you need two full-time employees in the newsroom, not at arm's length from the owners or the publishers. So, out of the 56 newspapers that you represent in my province of Saskatchewan, how many would be eligible for funding out of Bill C-18, and how many would not be eligible for funding out of Bill C-18? Can you give me those numbers?
Chris or Steve.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Four out of 56...and we're going to save the Saskatchewan Weekly Newspapers Association. So, if there are no amendments made to Bill C-18, despite what our friend from the NDP has said here at committee, this really does no good whatsoever for the weekly newspapers in Lanigan, in Lloydminster, in Langenburg, and others.
I have looked at your page. You know, I asked a question last week about The World-Spectator in Moosomin. How much money would it get if this bill passes? Nobody has been able to tell me what that newspaper is eligible for.
Steve, could you tell me if The World-Spectator in Moosomin today would receive any money if this Bill C-18 passes through the House?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
That's my problem with this bill. Rural newspapers, many of them held by Conservative seats in this country, in Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan.... That's why I invited you here, because there is a huge flaw in Bill C-18, as mentioned by my Bloc counterpart, in rural Quebec. It is a fallacy led by this Liberal government that this bill is going to save journalism. It's not going to save journalism at all. I know it won't.
I want more information from Saskatchewan. When I look at your 56 newspapers, many of them are hanging on by their bare minimum right now. They don't have two full-time employees in the newsroom. This bill does them no good whatsoever. In fact, I will say this: This bill harms them, because they're competing with big organizations like Glacier in my province of Saskatchewan who may have two full-time employees. This bill actually harms you more than it helps you.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you for mentioning the $40 million, but we don't know where it's going to go. Nobody has said where some of that money is going to go. When I look at your 56 members, I'm really worried that some of these will be off the web page here a year from now.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thanks very much.
Madam Chair, I'm going to move a notice of motion, if I can, as I did on Thursday, September 22. I just want to read this, in the few seconds I have left:
That the Minister of Canadian Heritage be invited to appear before the committee, regarding the federal funding provided to the Community Media Advocacy Centre (CMAC) by the Department of Canadian Heritage and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC).
We have Minister Hussen coming, Madam Chair, but it is my wish that we get the Minister of Canadian Heritage here. He has five different departments taking money out of Canadian Heritage. We need to hear from the minister himself dealing with CMAC and the funding of $133,000.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
We're having trouble to get the Minister of Canadian Heritage here at times, and this is a very good motion. I put the motion on notice last week. I just brought it up today. We have other witnesses coming on Bill C-18, including the Alberta Weekly Newspapers Association, so we're going to have time for Mr. Julian to talk about that when they come.
That's it. Thank you.
View Corey Tochor Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
My question is for André from the Department of Natural Resources.
You talked about net zero. With the current trend lines of emissions going up in Canada and not going down, if it's not nuclear, how do we get to net zero by 2050?
View Corey Tochor Profile
CPC (SK)
We always hear about net zero with the current demands, but if EVs take off—the projections do look like that—the demand for electricity is only going to increase. Regardless of what province you're in, and yes, some provinces have more hydro and not to tell the provinces how to generate electricity per se, there's not that much hydro left that is “easy” in many of the provinces. If it's not nuclear, how do we do it? This is the question everyone is asking.
If there have been studies on replacing all of that natural gas with, say, solar, how many acres or how much of Canada would be covered by something like that? It would be enormous. The promise of nuclear is hopefully to use fewer non-renewable resources. I'm just curious here. From the department side of things, what is the plan B then?
View Corey Tochor Profile
CPC (SK)
I want to switch gears to the regulatory side and the CNSC. It is my understanding that the SMRs will be classified as a class 1A nuclear facility, which is similar to the existing traditional plants out there. Could you expand more on this technology-neutral approach?
How does that break down? What are the benefits and disadvantages of having the same classification for SMRs versus the would-be CANDUs in Canada?
View Corey Tochor Profile
CPC (SK)
Just briefly, how safe is nuclear? Are you proud of the record that our country has with nuclear facilities?
View Corey Tochor Profile
CPC (SK)
View Michael Kram Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to all the witnesses for joining us this morning.
Mr. Wudrick from the Macdonald-Laurier Institute, I found your opening presentation very intriguing. For a minute there, I thought you were going to be very critical of small businesses compared to large businesses, but, as your presentation went on, the conclusion that I came to was that if we're going to increase the standard of living in this country, we need to grow small and medium-sized businesses into large businesses. Would you agree?
View Michael Kram Profile
CPC (SK)
Regarding those small and medium-sized businesses that have the potential to grow into large businesses, what do you see as the major barriers to growth in this country?
View Michael Kram Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you very much.
I would like to change gears right now for Mr. Pecman. I found the creation of the competitiveness council a very fascinating idea. I want to be clear. When we talk about anti-competitive behaviour, are we talking about price collusion and price-fixing or just a lack of competition in general?
View Michael Kram Profile
CPC (SK)
SMEs in Canada pay some of the highest credit card processing fees in the world. If we went with your approach and we adopted this competitiveness council, how would the council deal with high credit card fees?
View Michael Kram Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, I think I'm at time.
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
There's nothing we can do to improve [Inaudible—Editor].
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I want to thank both of the witnesses. I'm going to try to get to both of you in my time, but I'm going to start with Ms. Exner-Pirot.
Your third recommendation talked about the Arctic Council becoming an A7 going forward. You talk about the status of it currently being on pause as the reason that we must evolve.
I would be curious to hear your perspective on how that plays out in the element of what I understand on the Arctic Council to be the indigenous permanent participants process, where there are a number of organizations and entities that are represented there, and they don't have any kind of legal standing, but they are able to have significant input. Some of those organizations include representation from Russia as well, if I look at the history of that.
In the context of the Arctic Council becoming an A7 going forward, how does that translate through to the indigenous permanent participant process in that council in your opinion, please?
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you for that. I appreciate your very thoughtful and intelligent response to any of the questions we have.
I'm going to flip over to Ms. Nicol for a minute.
You opened up a line of questioning for me that I wasn't thinking about today, Ms. Nicol, when you talked about the James Smith Cree Nation events of the last few weeks here. You talked about community policing. I had the privilege of meeting with one of the vice-chiefs of the tribal council of which James Smith Cree Nation is a member nation. We talked about community policing, but beyond that we talked about a community safety program that's more than just first nations policing. We also talked about the need to educate local people to be part of both of those components.
I would like to give you an opportunity to flesh that out a little based on what you spoke of in your opening comments and give you more time to talk about that specifically, please.
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Dr. Nicol, I'm going to interject quickly because I have about 30 seconds.
I want to really quickly maybe speak to the cultural component that would be so very relevant in the training aspect of either community safety or community policing.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Chair, we've had multiple interruptions with Dr. Geist. Could we go back to the four minutes? We do need to hear from Dr. Geist. I think if you went back to after his first introduction it would be fine, but I think it would be fair to say the four-minute mark and let him go from there.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Welcome, all.
One of the things I've witnessed is that CBC is pilfering talent from the newspapers across this country, and that's going to continue with this bill. I'm going to tell you that right now. CBC develops little or no talent on its own, because it just pilfers from mid-to-lower newspapers in this country, and that isn't an issue this bill is going to deal with.
I'm going to start with News Media.
Mr. Deegan, I know my statement is correct. I've seen it. It's going to continue. With this bill going through, it will continue even more. We are going to get reporters with little or no experience put in rural Canada because there are no reporters. What are your thoughts on this?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
I couldn't agree with you more. They're competing with everybody, and they win because they're the CBC and The National.
The other question I have, Mr. Geist, is simply this: Can you or somebody else tell me...? The Moosomin World-Spectator was told that this was going to be worth a lot of money to local independent owners. What can the owner of the Moosomin World-Spectator expect from this deal? Is it $5,000 a year? Is it $10,000 a year? Is it $100,000 a year? If he has two employees in the newsroom, he's eligible.
I have not heard a figure that I can take back to an independent owner in this country to say that it's good: “Sure it's good: I'm getting $5,000 extra.” I need the figure, the exact figure that will be negotiated for the lower and medium newspapers. Can someone on this panel tell me what they can expect? I've heard outrageous numbers. I need to know exactly the number that they can expect.
Does anybody on this panel want to take a shot at that?
Go ahead, Mr. Geist.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
I'm going to ask her right now, Madam Chair.
View Michael Kram Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you for being here today, Mr. Carr, and welcome to the Standing Committee on Industry and Technology.
I read Bill C-235. It's my understanding that this bill applies to Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba only. Is that correct?
View Michael Kram Profile
CPC (SK)
Those three provinces are represented by 62 members of Parliament. When we voted on this bill last June, 51 of those MPs voted against it and only 10 voted in favour, with one MP abstaining.
The question has to be asked: Why do you suppose this bill is so unpopular in the only three provinces it actually affects?
View Michael Kram Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay. That's fair enough.
For years, provincial governments in western Canada and the oil and gas sector have been calling for more pipelines to get built, such as the Keystone XL, Trans Mountain and northern gateway pipelines. However, this bill talks about prioritizing projects such as tree planting and solar energy.
How will that help get more pipelines built in western Canada?
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