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Results: 1 - 15 of 57
View Brenda Shanahan Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, today is World Milk Day and I would like to thank all our farmers. In Quebec, 11,000 producers on 5,000 farms produce the milk, butter, cream, yogourt, and cheese that we are proud of and even the ice cream that I love.
In 1972, the Trudeau Liberal government put in place the supply management system that protects our Canadian producers.
Would the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food tell us about what our government is doing for the dairy sector?
View Marie-Claude Bibeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, our government recognizes the importance of Canada's dairy producers, and we keep our promises to them.
They have already received more than $1 billion in compensation for the agreements signed with the European Union and the trans-Pacific region. They already know what they will receive in 2022 and 2023 and compensation for the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement will follow. We remain committed to protecting the supply management system and not giving up any more market share.
I wish everyone a happy World Milk Day.
View Richard Lehoux Profile
CPC (QC)
View Richard Lehoux Profile
2021-06-01 15:03
Mr. Speaker, today being World Milk Day, my question is for the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.
Over the past year, the government has finally made some announcements for dairy farmers, but our dairy processors are still waiting. Negotiations on compensation under CUSMA have stalled. Meanwhile, our American counterparts are already disputing the tariff rate quotas.
What will the minister do to better protect the Canadian dairy sector and the products that cross our borders? When will we see real help for processors?
View Marie-Claude Bibeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I would remind my hon. colleague that in the last budget, we announced compensation for Canada's dairy, poultry and egg processors. I am also working closely with the Minister of International Trade to follow up with the Canada-Quebec committee. We are confident that we are applying the tariff rate quotas in accordance with the agreement we very carefully negotiated with the United States.
I want to reassure all milk producers that we have their backs.
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:04 [p.7676]
Madam Chair, good evening to all members attending today's committee.
With the rapid rollout of vaccines, I am optimistic that we will be able to reopen our economy, and with the investments we are making in budget 2021, we can look forward to a strong, sustainable and inclusive economic recovery.
Our government's COVID-19 economic response plan has protected millions of jobs, provided emergency supports to countless families and kept businesses afloat throughout the pandemic. We have had the backs of Canadians and businesses since day one.
Budget 2021 sets us up to finish this fight against COVID-19 and to keep Canadians healthy and safe, all the while building a better, fairer and more prosperous future for generations to come. The time to act is now and this budget puts us on the right path. However, this is not 2009. We cannot afford to take a decade to recover from the COVID recession.
We are taking prompt, decisive, responsible action.
We are making ambitious and targeted investments to accelerate job and business growth, driving toward faster recovery than if we did not take any action. This is the most small-business friendly budget in Canadian history.
We are extending the Canada emergency wage subsidy and the Canada emergency rent subsidy to September, with flexibility to go further than that if public health measures require it.
We are also announcing new supports to bridge the recovery, such as the Canada recovery hiring program, as 500,000 Canadians are still unemployed or have reduced hours because of the pandemic. We will invest $600 million so that businesses can hire more workers or increase hours and compensation for those they already have.
We also announced significant investments to support the success of diverse entrepreneurs through the Black entrepreneurship program, the women entrepreneurship strategy and investments for indigenous entrepreneurs. This is part of the greater action our government is taking to make our economy more inclusive and to bridge the gaps that racialized and under-represented entrepreneurs and businesses have faced for far too long.
Budget 2021 is ambitious.
It will not just get us onto the road to recovery. It will take us where we need to go to be competitive, to be more prosperous and to become even more resilient. Since my first day as minister, I have been focused on ensuring that businesses have the tools they need to start up, scale up and access new global markets. COVID-19 and our economic recovery have only increased the importance of this work.
Our businesses need the tools and the financing to compete in today's economy. That is why we are expanding the Canada small business financing program loans of up to $500,000, with a potential line of credit of up to $150,000, to provide liquidity for start-up costs and intangible assets, such as software for data management and supports for intellectual property. We have also committed to taking decisive action to lowering credit card fees for small businesses, helping to make consumer interactions more beneficial so that our main streets can be even more competitive.
Beyond financing, we want to ensure that our Canadian entrepreneurs have the expertise and tools to protect their Canadian innovations in the increasingly intangible global economy. The pandemic has greatly expedited the shift to the digital economy. More businesses have gone online in the last six months than in the last 10 years.
The pandemic has also shown the importance of businesses needing the latest tools, technologies and expertise to compete. In budget 2021, we are investing $4 billion for small and medium-sized businesses to go digital and to adopt new technology so they can grown and be even more competitive. This will support some 160,000 businesses and create jobs for nearly 30,000 young Canadians.
It will ensure long-term post-recovery growth and competitiveness.
Today, our small businesses are just a click away from being exporters, and we want to support as many as possible to grow around the world, while anchoring their success here in Canada, and to create jobs.
We have seen another global shift, one to sustainability. We know that the environment and the economy go hand in hand, which is why we have also announced $1 billion over five years to help draw in private sector investment for Canadian clean tech projects, ensuring that they remain competitive and on the cutting edge of innovation. This will help us reach our target of net-zero emissions by 2050. Through this budget, we are setting up our businesses to start up and scale up now, and to be ready to succeed and thrive in the economy of the future.
While travel has been limited through COVID-19, I have not let it slow us down in our efforts to create opportunities for trade and investment, to diversify our trade and to develop solutions to supply chain challenges, especially for essential goods. COVID-19 should not and cannot be used as an excuse to stop trading or to turn inward with protectionist policies.
International trade has been critical to create jobs and opportunities for growth. This is truer in our economic recovery more than ever. By working to implement the new NAFTA, CETA and the CPTPP, Canada's businesses are able to access new markets to expand their companies.
Canada and Canadian workers from coast to coast will benefit.
We have continued our work to ensure that Canada's 14 free trade agreements, including the new NAFTA and the recent trade continuity agreement with the United Kingdom, continue to serve Canadian interests and Canadian businesses, entrepreneurs, workers and families.
Earlier this month, I met with my Mexican and U.S. counterparts to discuss the implementation of the new NAFTA, and to work together on our shared priorities, such as the environment, labour and inclusive trade, for our shared economic recovery. From steel and dairy, to forestry and clean tech, we have the backs of Canadian businesses and workers in all sectors.
Our government has pivoted during the pandemic to support Canadian businesses through virtual trade missions to France, Singapore, Taiwan and South Korea; through the first Canada-Africa clean growth symposium; and through our virtual CETA road show last year. With over 2,000 entrepreneurs attending, we have made international trade more accessible. We have led over 150 business-to-business connections for our Canadian businesses.
We continue to take a team Canada approach to help businesses and entrepreneurs succeed here at home and abroad with Canada's trade tool kit: the Trade Commissioner Service, Export Development Canada, the Business Development Bank of Canada, the Canadian Commercial Corporation and Invest in Canada. They are all working together and focused on supporting Canadian businesses and their needs.
Budget 2021 will support the Trade Commissioner Service by providing $21.3 million over the next five years, and $4.3 million on an ongoing basis, to boost Canada's clean tech exports. We will work with our international partners and multilateral institutions to reduce unnecessary trade barriers and restrictions, keep supply chains open and build back a more resilient and inclusive economy. We will continue to work together, as we have done throughout the pandemic, including through our work on the WTO's trade and health initiative, to ensure that our essential health and medical supply chains remain open and resilient.
Crucially, we must also continue our hard work with one another and with all of our international partners to find solutions that accelerate the production and equitable distribution of affordable, effective life-saving vaccines. The pandemic is not over anywhere until it is over everywhere. We are committed to continuing our work toward a speedy and just global recovery.
I look forward to answering questions.
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Rachel Bendayan Profile
2021-05-31 20:14 [p.7678]
Madam Chair, I would like to ask the minister for a little more information on something she mentioned in her earlier remarks. I understand the minister was able to meet with her CUSMA counterparts.
For the benefit of all members in the House, I am not sure if everybody realizes that one in six jobs in Canada is supported by exports to either Mexico or the United States. I am hoping the minister could give us a few more details on this important meeting on the new NAFTA and its implementation.
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:15 [p.7678]
Madam Chair, very recently we, my colleagues from both Mexico and the United States and I, held our first free trade commission meeting. It was a terrific first meeting. I might also say it was a historic one, where the trade minister, the trade representative and the secretary of economy were all women. We met to discuss the new NAFTA's implementation. We also talked about our shared priorities for recovery, which include the environment, labour and inclusive trade.
Canada's long-standing relationship with the U.S. and Mexico is an important one. Trade in North America creates jobs and economic prosperity for people in all three countries. Our people ties, as well as our business ties, have built one of the most competitive trade regions in the world. We talked about how we could advance climate action, how we can promote digital trade in North America and how to make sure that our economic recovery from COVID-19 is both sustainable and inclusive.
The new NAFTA is historic. Ensuring that we work together to create North American competitiveness for our economic recovery was what our meeting was all about.
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2021-05-31 20:27 [p.7679]
Madam Chair, the comment had to do with having a minister, or a prime minister, make a statement that is then countered by another government disagreeing.
On February 27, 2020, the Conservative members from the trade committee wrote to the Deputy Prime Minister outlining all of the adverse impacts of CUSMA on softwood lumber, and how CUSMA does nothing to prevent the United States from applying anti-dumping and countervailing duties to Canadian softwood lumber.
Does the minister regret not negotiating softwood lumber into CUSMA?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:27 [p.7680]
Madam Chair, we have reiterated to the U.S. at every opportunity that a negotiated agreement is possible and in the best interests of both countries. I look forward to continuing to work with United States on this matter.
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 20:28 [p.7680]
Madam Chair, our work has been consistent in standing up for the interest of Canada's forestry sector and the workers that it employs and working with the—
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-05-31 21:19 [p.7687]
Madam Chair, I will be splitting my time with the member for Thornhill, and my questions are for the Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion.
First, concerning the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement, does the minister acknowledge that Canada gave up part of its sovereignty over dairy policy by eliminating class 7?
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 21:20 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, our supply management system is fundamental to the overall success of Canada's agriculture and agri-food industry. That is why in the negotiations for the new NAFTA our government fought hard to maintain three pillars of Canada's supply management system: production control, pricing mechanisms and import control. Let's remember—
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2021-05-31 21:20 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, tomorrow is World Milk Day, and I think that Canadian producers have the right to know if the Liberal government agreed to cap our exports of non-fat dairy solids and if it sees this as a gain for Canadian producers.
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mary Ng Profile
2021-05-31 21:21 [p.7688]
Madam Chair, it is important to remember that the U.S. administration was calling for a complete dismantling of the supply management system, and our government defended and preserved the system from a very strong U.S. attempt. Today, we continue to work to ensure that we are standing up and helping our Canadian dairy producers—
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