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Seating Plan


Chamber Orientation

The House of Commons chamber is rectangular in shape. It is separated into two halves by a centre aisle. Each half has six rows of between 27 and 30 seats. The Speaker’s chair is located at one end of the chamber. Opposite to the chair at the other end is the bar, a brass rod extending across the floor of the chamber past which non-Members are not permitted.

Each member of Parliament is assigned a seat in the Commons chamber. The Prime Minister and cabinet sit in the front rows to the Speaker’s right. Other members of the governing party are also seated to the Speaker’s right. The Leader of the Opposition and other leading members of the opposition parties sit in the front rows to the Speaker’s left. Other members of the official opposition and all other recognized parties are also seated to the Speaker’s left. If there are more government members or opposition members than can be accommodated on one side, the larger group will have members seated on both sides of the chamber. Members of parties not recognized in the House and independent members are assigned seats by the Speaker.

Seating Plan

The seat position of each member of Parliament, including their name, political affiliation, constituency and province are as follows.


Legend

337 members currently have seats in the House of Commons (98 women, 239 men)

PM
Prime Minister
Cabinet Member
Liberal : 156
Conservative : 121
Bloc Québécois : 32
NDP : 24
Green Party : 3
Independent : 1
Unoccupied seat
A political party must have at least 12 members in the House of Commons to be a "recognized party" for the purposes of parliamentary proceedings.