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Wednesday, May 5, 2021 (No. 95)

Private Members’ Business


Items outside the Order of Precedence

The complete list of items of private members’ business outside the order of precedence is available on the House of Commons website at the following address: https://www.ourcommons.ca.

Public Bills (Commons)

C-201 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Health of Bill C-201, An Act to develop a national school food program for children.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — March 12, 2020
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — April 9, 2021
C-202 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights of Bill C-202, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (assault against a health care worker).
C-203 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on National Defence of Bill C-203, An Act to amend the National Defence Act (maiming or injuring self or another).
C-207 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Jowhari (Richmond Hill) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights of Bill C-207, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (presentence report).
C-209 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology of Bill C-209, An Act to amend the Copyright Act (Crown copyright).
C-211 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Health of Bill C-211, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (assaults against health care professionals and first responders).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Falk (Provencher) — February 27, 2020
Mr. Kmiec (Calgary Shepard) — March 2, 2020
Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — March 6, 2020
Mrs. Gray (Kelowna—Lake Country) — March 13, 2020
Mr. Melillo (Kenora) — September 28, 2020
C-212 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities of Bill C-212, An Act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (special benefits).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 21, 2020
C-227 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities of Bill C-227, An Act to amend the Employment Equity Act.
C-235 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights of Bill C-235, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Weiler (West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country) — March 10, 2020
Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — March 11, 2020
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — July 17, 2020
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
C-239 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities of Bill C-239, An Act to establish a national cycling strategy.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — March 12, 2020
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
C-240 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Health of Bill C-240, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (voting age).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — July 17, 2020
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
C-241 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics of Bill C-241, An Act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act (change of political affiliation).
C-242 — September 23, 2020 — Mrs. DeBellefeuille (Salaberry—Suroît) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities of Bill C-242, An Act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (illness, injury or quarantine).
C-243 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Brunelle-Duceppe (Lac-Saint-Jean) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-243, An Act to amend the Payment Card Networks Act (credit card acceptance fees).
C-244 — September 23, 2020 — Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development of Bill C-244, An Act to amend the Canadian Navigable Waters Act (North Thames River, Middle Thames River and Thames River).
C-245 — September 23, 2020 — Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development of Bill C-245, An Act respecting the development of a national strategy in relation to fresh water.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — July 21, 2020
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
C-246 — September 30, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities of Bill C-246, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act and the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — October 1, 2020
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
Mrs. Atwin (Fredericton) — February 23, 2021
C-247 — October 5, 2020 — Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights of Bill C-247, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (controlling or coercive conduct).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — May 3, 2021
C-248 — October 8, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on the Status of Women of Bill C-248, An Act to amend the Financial Administration Act (composition of boards of directors).
C-249 — October 23, 2020 — Mr. Barsalou-Duval (Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities of Bill C-249, An Act to amend the Canada Transportation Act (refund – cancelled air service).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — October 28, 2020
C-250 — October 26, 2020 — Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities of Bill C-250, An Act to amend the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (anchorage prohibition).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — October 26, 2020
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — October 27, 2020
C-251 — November 5, 2020 — Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities of Bill C-251, An Act to continue VIA Rail Canada Inc. under the name VIA Rail Canada and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — November 5, 2020
Mrs. Atwin (Fredericton) — February 23, 2021
C-252 — November 18, 2020 — Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on International Trade of Bill C-252, An Act to provide for transparency in entering trade agreements and foreign investment protection agreements.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
C-255 — November 25, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities of Bill C-255, An Act respecting the development of a national employment strategy for persons with disabilities.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — December 7, 2020
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
Mrs. Atwin (Fredericton) — February 23, 2021
C-256 — November 26, 2020 — Mr. Morantz (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-256, Act to amend the Income Tax Act (donations involving private corporation shares or real estate).
C-257 — November 27, 2020 — Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans of Bill C-257, An Act to amend the Fisheries Act (closed containment aquaculture).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — December 7, 2020
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
C-258 — December 3, 2020 — Mr. Duvall (Hamilton Mountain) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities of Bill C-258, An Act to amend the Canada Labour Code (replacement workers).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — March 4, 2021
C-259 — December 3, 2020 — Mr. Duvall (Hamilton Mountain) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities of Bill C-259, An Act to amend the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act, the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act and the Pension Benefits Standards Act, 1985 (pension plans and group insurance programs).
C-260 — December 8, 2020 — Mr. Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates of Bill C-260, An Act to amend the Canada Post Corporation Act.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend) — December 17, 2020
C-261 — December 9, 2020 — Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities of Bill C-261, An Act to amend the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (thermal coal).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
Mrs. Atwin (Fredericton) — February 23, 2021
C-263 — February 1, 2021 — Mr. Kmiec (Calgary Shepard) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-263, An Act to amend the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act (equalization).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — February 2, 2021
Mr. Kurek (Battle River—Crowfoot) — February 8, 2021
Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan) — February 15, 2021
Mr. Shields (Bow River) — February 18, 2021
C-264 — February 4, 2021 — Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-264, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (volunteer firefighting and search and rescue volunteer services).
C-266 — February 5, 2021 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Health of Bill C-266, An Act regarding the right to know when products contain toxic substances.
C-270 — February 18, 2021 — Mr. Dubourg (Bourassa) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-270, An Act to amend the Excise Tax Act (school supplies).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mrs. Atwin (Fredericton) — February 19, 2021
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
C-273 — February 22, 2021 — Ms. Dzerowicz (Davenport) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-273, An Act to establish a national strategy for a guaranteed basic income.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Van Bynen (Newmarket—Aurora) — February 26, 2021
Mr. Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York) — March 1, 2021
Mr. Turnbull (Whitby) — March 16, 2021
Mr. Kelloway (Cape Breton—Canso) — March 17, 2021
Ms. Fry (Vancouver Centre) — March 18, 2021
Mr. Fillmore (Halifax) — March 22, 2021
Mr. Gerretsen (Kingston and the Islands) — March 30, 2021
Mr. Long (Saint John—Rothesay) — April 15, 2021
C-274 — March 11, 2021 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-274, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (criminal interest rate).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe) — March 11, 2021
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — March 12, 2021
C-275 — March 11, 2021 — Mr. Duvall (Hamilton Mountain) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-275, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (travel expenses deduction for tradespersons).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — March 12, 2021
C-276 — March 22, 2021 — Ms. Koutrakis (Vimy) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage of Bill C-276, An Act to designate the month of March as Hellenic Heritage Month.
C-277 — March 23, 2021 — Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights of Bill C-277, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and An Act to amend the Criminal Code (exploitation and trafficking in persons).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — March 26, 2021
Mr. Falk (Provencher) — March 30, 2021
C-278 — March 23, 2021 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities of Bill C-278, An Act to amend the Civil Air Navigation Services Commercialization Act.
C-279 — March 24, 2021 — Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs of Bill C-279, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (voting age).
C-280 — March 24, 2021 — Mr. Bachrach (Skeena—Bulkley Valley) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-280, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (residents of northern or intermediate zones).
C-281 — March 25, 2021 — Mr. Blanchette-Joncas (Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities of Bill C-281, An Act to amend the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (certificate of competency).
C-282 — April 13, 2021 — Mr. Chiu (Steveston—Richmond East) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development of Bill C-282, An Act to establish the Foreign Influence Registry.
C-283 — April 13, 2021 — Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food of Bill C-283, An Act to establish National Food Waste Awareness Day and to provide for the development of a national strategy to reduce food waste in Canada.
C-284 — April 13, 2021 — Mrs. McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology of Bill C-284, An Act to amend the Department of Industry Act (financial assistance).
C-285 — April 15, 2021 — Mrs. Atwin (Fredericton) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Health of Bill C-285, An Act to amend the Pest Control Products Act (glyphosate).
C-286 — April 15, 2021 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Health of Bill C-286, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to enact the Expungement of Certain Drug-related Convictions Act and the National Strategy on Substance Use Act.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — April 19, 2021
C-287 — April 16, 2021 — Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development of Bill C-287, An Act to amend the Official Development Assistance Accountability Act.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Falk (Provencher) — April 26, 2021
C-288 — April 19, 2021 — Mr. Lefebvre (Sudbury) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-288, An Act to amend the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act.
C-289 — April 20, 2021 — Mr. Calkins (Red Deer—Lacombe) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights of Bill C-289, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (sentencing).
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner) and Mr. Mazier (Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa) — April 20, 2021
Mrs. Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville) and Mr. Kurek (Battle River—Crowfoot) — April 21, 2021
Mr. Ruff (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound) and Mr. Barlow (Foothills) — April 22, 2021
Mr. Falk (Provencher) — April 26, 2021
Mrs. Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek) — April 29, 2021
C-290 — April 26, 2021 — Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food of Bill C-290, An Act respecting soil conservation and soil health.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — April 28, 2021
C-291 — April 29, 2021 — Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration of Bill C-291, An Act to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.
C-292 — May 3, 2021 — Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs of Bill C-292, An Act to establish Canadian Armed Forces Members Day.

Notices of Motions

M-1 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, in the opinion of the House:
(a) it is the duty of the government to create a Green New Deal (i) to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions through a fair and just transition for all communities and workers, (ii) to create millions of good, high-wage jobs and ensure prosperity and economic security for all Canadians, (iii) to invest in Canada’s infrastructure and industry to sustainably meet the challenges of the 21st century, (iv) to secure for all people of Canada for generations to come clean air and water, climate and community resiliency, healthy food, access to nature, and a sustainable environment, (v) to promote justice and equity by stopping current, preventing future, and repairing historic oppression of Indigenous Peoples (First Nations, Métis, and Inuit), racialized persons, non-dominant cultural, ethnic, religious and linguistic communities, immigrants and newcomers, youth, LGBTQ2S+ persons, the poor, low-income workers, women, the elderly, the unhoused, people with disabilities, migrant communities, deindustrialized communities and depopulated rural communities (referred to in this motion as "frontline and vulnerable communities");
(b) the goals described in paragraph (a) above (referred to in this motion as the "Green New Deal goals") should be accomplished through a 10-year national mobilization (referred to in this resolution as the "Green New Deal mobilization") that will require (i) building resiliency against climate-change-related disasters, such as extreme weather, including by leveraging funding and providing investments for community-defined projects and strategies, (ii) repairing and upgrading Canada’s infrastructure, including by eliminating pollution and greenhouse gas emissions as much as technologically feasible, by guaranteeing universal access to clean water by reducing the risks posed by flooding and other climate impacts, and by ensuring that any infrastructure spending considered by Parliament addresses climate change, (iii) meeting 100 percent of the power demand in Canada through clean, renewable, and zero-emission energy sources, including by dramatically expanding and upgrading existing renewable power sources and by deploying new capacity, (iv) building or upgrading to energy-efficient, distributed, and ‘‘smart’’ power grids, and working to ensure affordable access to electricity, (v) upgrading all existing buildings in Canada and building new buildings to achieve maximal energy efficiency, water efficiency, safety, affordability, comfort, and durability, including through electrification, (vi) spurring massive growth in clean manufacturing in Canada and removing pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from manufacturing and industry as much as is technologically feasible, including by expanding renewable energy manufacturing and investing in existing manufacturing and industry, (vii) working collaboratively with Canada’s farmers to eliminate pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from the agricultural sector as much as is technologically feasible, including by supporting family farming, by investing in sustainable farming and land use practices that increase soil health, and by building a more sustainable food system that ensures universal access to healthy food, (viii) overhauling Canada’s transportation systems to eliminate pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector as much as is technologically feasible, including through investment in zero-emission vehicle infrastructure and manufacturing, and clean, affordable, and accessible public transportation, and high-speed rail, (ix) mitigating and managing the long-term adverse health, economic, and other effects of pollution and climate change, including by providing funding for community-defined projects and strategies, (x) removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and reducing pollution, including by restoring natural ecosystems through proven low-tech solutions that increase soil carbon storage, such as preservation and afforestation, (xi) restoring and protecting threatened, endangered, and fragile ecosystems through locally appropriate and science-based projects that enhance biodiversity and support climate resiliency, (xii) cleaning up existing hazardous waste and abandoned sites to promote economic development and sustainability, (xiii) identifying other emission and pollution sources and creating solutions to eliminate them, (xiv) promoting the international exchange of technology, expertise, products, funding, and services, with the aim of making Canada the international leader on climate action, and to help other countries achieve a Green New Deal;
(c) a Green New Deal must be developed through transparent and inclusive consultation, collaboration, and partnership with Indigenous Peoples, frontline and vulnerable communities, labour unions, worker cooperatives, civil society groups, academia, and businesses; and
(d) to achieve the Green New Deal goals and mobilization, a Green New Deal will require (i) providing and leveraging, in a way that ensures that the public receives appropriate ownership stakes and returns on investment, adequate capital (including through community grants, public banks, and other public financing), technical expertise, supporting policies, and other forms of assistance to communities, organizations, federal, provincial, and municipal governments, and businesses working on the Green New Deal mobilization, (ii) ensuring that the government takes into account the complete environmental and social costs and impacts of emissions through existing laws, new policies and programs, and ensuring that frontline and vulnerable communities shall not be adversely affected, (iii) providing resources, training, and high-quality education, including higher education, to all Canadians, with a focus on frontline and vulnerable communities, so those communities may be full and equal participants in the Green New Deal mobilization, (iv) making public investments in the research and development of new clean and renewable energy technologies and industries, (v) directing investments to spur economic development, deepen and diversify industry in local and regional economies, and build wealth and community ownership, while prioritizing high-quality job creation and economic, social, and environmental benefits in frontline and vulnerable communities that may otherwise struggle with the transition away from greenhouse gas intensive industries, (vi) ensuring the use of democratic and participatory processes that are inclusive of and led by frontline and vulnerable communities and workers to plan, implement, and administer the Green New Deal mobilization at the local level, (vii) ensuring that the Green New Deal mobilization creates high-quality union jobs that pay prevailing wages, hires local workers, offers training and advancement opportunities, and guarantees wage and benefit parity for workers affected by the transition, (viii) guaranteeing a job with a family-sustaining wage, adequate family and medical leave, paid vacations, and retirement security to all Canadians, (ix) strengthening and protecting the right of all workers to organize, unionize, and collectively bargain free of coercion, intimidation, and harassment, (x) strengthening and enforcing labour, workplace health and safety, antidiscrimination, and wage and hour standards across all employers, industries, and sectors, (xi) enacting and enforcing trade rules, procurement standards, and border adjustments with strong labor and environmental protections to stop the transfer of jobs and pollution overseas, and to grow domestic manufacturing in Canada, (xii) ensuring that public lands, waters, and oceans are protected, and that eminent domain is not abused, (xiii) obtaining the free, prior, and informed consent of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people for all decisions that affect First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people and their traditional territories, honouring all treaties and agreements with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people, and protecting and enforcing the sovereignty and land rights of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people, (xiv) ensuring a commercial environment where every businessperson is free from unfair competition and domination by domestic or international monopolies, (xv) providing all Canadians with high-quality health care, affordable, safe, and adequate housing, economic security, and access to clean water, clean air, healthy and affordable food, and nature.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford), Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe), Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) and Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East) — December 10, 2019
Mr. Masse (Windsor West) and Mr. Bachrach (Skeena—Bulkley Valley) — December 11, 2019
Ms. Ashton (Churchill—Keewatinook Aski), Ms. Collins (Victoria), Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona), Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay), Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke), Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River) and Mr. Green (Hamilton Centre) — December 12, 2019
Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — December 13, 2019
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — December 19, 2019
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — January 28, 2020
Ms. Qaqqaq (Nunavut) and Ms. Gazan (Winnipeg Centre) — February 6, 2020
M-2 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should: (a) ban the import, export and sale of dog and cat fur; (b) impose penalties on individuals and businesses who deal with unlabeled and falsely labeled dog and cat fur products; and (c) work with provincial counterparts and the international community to advance support for the implementation of a complete ban of the trade in all dog and cat fur products worldwide.
M-3 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should remove the goods and services tax from sign language interpretation services.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Melillo (Kenora) — September 28, 2020
M-4 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should: (a) recognize that health care is a basic human right and that no Canadian should be denied access to the prescription medicine they need to be healthy; (b) recognize that a “medical cannabis product” is a cannabis product sold for medical purposes pursuant to a license for the sale of cannabis for medical purposes granted in accordance with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act or the Cannabis Act; (c) recognize that although medical cannabis does not have a Drug Identification Number, it is produced and sold in a highly regulated regime known as the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations; (d) recognize that patients who are legally authorized or prescribed cannabis for medical purposes by a physician and prescribing healthcare practitioner can legally purchase quality-controlled cannabis for medical purposes from a Health Canada licensed producer; (e) recognize that the Canada Revenue Agency considers cannabis for medical purposes a tax-deductible medical expense; (f) allow for reasonable access to medical cannabis for all Canadians who have been authorized to use it by a health care practitioner; (g) recognize that medical cannabis patients, including pediatric patients, already pay sales tax and shipping costs on medical cannabis and are not eligible for reimbursement under most insurance plans in Canada; (h) recognize that its proposal to apply excise taxes to medical cannabis, in addition to the existing sales tax, disadvantages the more than 360,000 Canadian medical cannabis patients authorized to possess cannabis for medical purposes and their families; (i) not apply an excise duty to cannabis sold for medical purposes; (j) recognize that medical cannabis should be exempt from the federal goods and services tax; (k) exempt medical cannabis from any taxes including the new excise tax after the passage of Bill C-74, Budget Implementation Act, 2018, No. 1; and (l) zero-rate the medical cannabis tax in line with all other prescription medicine and exempt medical cannabis from any additional taxes by amending T 3 Amendments to the Excise Act, 2001 (Cannabis Taxation), the Excise Tax Act and Other Related Texts, 69(4) Section 2 of the Act, in order to allow for reasonable access to medical cannabis for all Canadians authorized to use it by a health care practitioner.
M-5 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should: (a) acknowledge the commitment and sacrifice made by military and veteran families who put their careers on hold to accompany their love ones abroad or to act as primary caregivers when the member of the military or veteran is mentally or physically injured; and (b) develop legislation for job protection for spouses, children and parents who make professional sacrifices to support our military and veterans.
M-6 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should: (a) recognize that there are only a dozen years of global warming to be kept to a maximum of 1.5 °C, beyond which even half a degree will significantly worsen the risks of drought, floods, extreme heat and poverty for hundreds of millions of people; (b) recognize that limiting global warming to a maximum of 1.5 °C requires rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes across Canada; and (c) ensure that Canada’s laws are in harmony with the recommendations outlined in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) "Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty".
M-7 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should work in collaboration with the provinces, territories, municipalities, Aboriginal communities, and housing providers to establish, develop, and implement an affordable housing strategy that: (a) affirms that access to adequate housing is a fundamental right of all Canadians, as guaranteed by the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights; (b) provides financial assistance, without discrimination, to those who are otherwise unable to afford adequate and secure housing; (c) ensures that the cost of housing does not compromise an individual’s ability to meet other basic needs, including food, clothing, healthcare, and education; (d) maintains and expands direct federal investments in social housing, including not-for-profit cooperatives, in order to increase the supply of low-income housing, preserve rent subsidies, and provide funds for renovations and maintenance; (e) sets targets and objectives to prevent, reduce, and end homelessness, particularly among vulnerable populations, with clear timelines and accountability measures; (f) examines and addresses the potential impact of investor speculation and housing vacancies on the high price of real estate in urban markets; and (g) takes into account the unique needs and housing priorities of different regions, including British Columbia.
M-8 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should recognize and give thanks for the great sacrifices made by Canadian veterans in protecting our society, and make Canadian passports available free of charge to all veterans of the Canadian forces.
M-9 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should conduct public hearings of the views of Canadians and stakeholders on privacy concerns relating to the outsourcing of work in the public and private sectors to companies in foreign countries or their subsidiaries located in Canada.
M-10 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should recognize the contribution made to Canadian society by all of its seniors and make Canadian passports available at not more than half-price to all Canadian citizens over the age of 65.
M-11 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — That a special committee of the House be created to study and develop recommendations needed for Canada's manufacturing industry and report back to the House: (a) identifying the manufacturing industry as a strategic sector for economic development; (b) reviewing the causes and consequences of manufacturing job loss; (c) reviewing ways to strengthen Canada's manufacturing sector; (d) detailing a comprehensive set of economic, fiscal, monetary, and trade policies that will both strengthen the domestic manufacturing industry and protect manufacturing jobs; and (e) enumerating the improvements needed in bankruptcy laws, wage protection, transition programs, training programs, relocation programs, employment insurance benefits and pension laws to ensure that workers are protected during job loss.
M-12 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should take action to address the varying costs of oil and gas that Canadians are paying across the country and between provinces, and that the government should create a new office for an Oil and Gas Ombudsman which would: (a) investigate complaints from Canadians regarding excessive prices at gas pumps and other sources of oil and gas; (b) have the ability to investigate independently and thoroughly the concerns made by Canadians; (c) be responsible for gathering and publishing a weekly petroleum inventory report, modelled on the United States Department of Energy's weekly Petroleum Status Report, that would give weekly updates on refinery oil inputs and petroleum productions; (d) be responsible to report to Parliament annually with an independent report about whether or not Canadians are paying too much for these products and whether the respective companies complied in full with any investigations; and (e) work with Canadians and producers to ensure that all Canadians and communities are paying fair prices and receiving fair product amount of the gasoline and oil that they purchase.
M-13 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should conduct an audit of the Passport Office to ensure that Canadians can acquire passports at the lowest possible cost and that passport processing fees do not generate surplus revenue.
M-14 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should: (a) create a petroleum-monitoring agency with a three-year mandate to collect and disseminate, on a timely basis, price data on crude oil, refined petroleum products, and retail gasoline for all relevant North American markets; (b) in consultation with stakeholders from the petroleum sector (major companies, independent companies, and consumer groups), appoint a director who would lead this agency; (c) require the agency to report to Parliament on an annual basis on the competitive aspects of the petroleum sector in Canada; and (d) request that the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology review the agency's performance and the need for an extension of its mandate following the tabling of the agency's third report.
M-15 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should defer further review and any approval of the Deep Geologic Repository Project environmental assessment for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste at the Bruce Nuclear Site until such time as: (a) an independent technical body is established and has completed (i) an evaluation of the state of technical and scientific knowledge with respect to deep geological repositories for nuclear waste, (ii) an assessment as to whether Canada's regulatory regime is sufficiently robust to adequately support an environmental assessment and licensing review of proposals for deep geologic repositories; b) there is a full evaluation of alternatives to the proposed deep geologic repository, including alternative sites, alternative designs and alternative methods; and (c) residents, stakeholders and rights holders in the Great Lakes Basin, including in potential host communities, neighbouring communities, transportation corridor communities, and the broader Great Lakes community, are engaged in a direct and active dialogue facilitated by a trusted third party.
M-16 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should ensure that telecommunications services remain a tool for social, democratic, economic, and cultural growth by mandating government frameworks overseeing digital telecommunication services in Canada to abide by the following principles: (a) access to universal telecommunication services across Canada must be efficient and affordable for Canadians; (b) fees for access to services must be transparent so that Canadians can easily understand the charges they incur; (c) security must be a core responsibility for telecommunications service providers, affirming that the collection of personal information in the digital space includes a duty to proactively protect personal information and that a failure to meet a reasonable standard of due diligence constitutes negligence; (d) cybersecurity must be a continuous focus that prioritizes protecting Canadians from foreign or domestic cyber-attacks that compromise public safety, financial security, personal information, and our democracy; (e) judicial oversight governing surveillance, site-blocking, or disconnection is required; (f) net neutrality must be a legislated and regulated core principle for provision of digital services; (g) privacy rights in the digital world must be equivalent to those in the physical world, so that full informed consent must be stipulated prior to the collection, use and disclosure of personal information by private or public organizations; (h) personal data must be controlled by the individual to whom the data belongs; (i) Health Canada and any other appropriate federal departments must be provided the opportunity to study potential human or environmental impacts related to digital services and products and the disposal thereof in the Canadian market; (j) businesses operating in the digital industry must not undermine consumer rights through non-negotiated contracts and have a duty to be transparent regarding the maintenance of devices; (k) Canadians of all ages must be provided opportunities to develop digital literacy skills with a specific focus on children and seniors; (l) the internet must be free from cyber­bullying or harassment; and (m) open data frameworks must be consistent with recognized best practices that protect privacy and create greater transparency and accountability while helping to improve public sector service delivery.
M-17 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston) — That the House recognize that acts of violence and bigotry directed against religious believers, such as the June 23, 1985, bombing of Air India Flights 182 and 301, the September 15, 2001, firebombing of the Hindu Samaj Temple and the Hamilton Mountain Mosque, the April 5, 2004, firebombing of Montreal’s United Talmud Torah Jewish school, and the January 29, 2017, murder of Muslims at the Quebec City Islamic Cultural Centre, are inimical to a free, peaceful, and plural society, and declare January 29 of every year as National Day of Solidarity with Victims of Anti-religious Bigotry and Violence.
M-19 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should amend the Live-in Caregiver Program to: (a) provide live-in caregivers permanent residency immediately upon entering Canada; (b) allow live-in caregivers to bring their spouses and children with them upon entering Canada; (c) ensure live-in caregivers have the option of living outside the employer’s home; (d) require live-in caregivers, their spouses, and their children to pass only one medical examination prior to arriving in Canada; and (e) remove caps on the number of permanent resident visas available to live-in caregivers, as well as the requirement for post-secondary education for permanent residency.
M-20 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should establish a dental care plan for uninsured Canadians as a first step towards universal public dental care coverage.
M-21 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should renew and increase federal funding to Heart and Stroke's women's heart and brain health research to $5 million per year over five years.
M-22 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the federal government should provide funding for 40% of the cost of all major transit infrastructure projects across Canada and create permanent stable mechanisms to provide predicable long-term funding streams to meet this objective.
M-23 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should re-establish the Federal Co-op Housing Program.
M-24 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should establish a legislated guaranteed livable income for all Canadians.
M-25 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should establish a ministry of peace in order to promote peace, democracy and human rights in Canada and globally.
M-26 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should address the decline in elephant populations by introducing a ban on all domestic trade in elephant ivory, and prohibiting the import, export, and re-export of elephant ivory in order to close the existing trade gap, drive down demand, and improve conservation efforts of this endangered species.
M-27 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should work with domestic and international stakeholders to address the decline in the monarch butterfly population by increasing the collection and sharing of scientific data relating to the monarch’s habitats, reproduction, migration, and population levels, and by developing appropriate domestic and international policy responses with the goal of protecting, expanding, and enhancing the reproductive and migratory habitats of monarch butterflies.
M-28 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should: (a) facilitate the involvement of people living with HIV in all decisions made across government that relate to the health, well-being, and dignity of people living with and affected by HIV; (b) encourage people living with HIV to start and stay on treatment; and (c) work towards dismantling HIV stigma at the community, clinical, and personal levels by adopting the Ontario Accord and endorsing the Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U) campaign.
M-29 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should provide funding to construct a Vietnamese cultural centre in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia.
M-30 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should take immediate steps to address the alarming and dangerous loss of bee colonies and other pollinating insects in Canada and beyond by: (a) recognizing the vital role that bees and other pollinating insects perform ecologically, economically, and for our food security; (b) phasing out the widespread use of neonicotinoid pesticides and ensuring access to safe alternatives; and (c) developing a strategy to address the multiple factors related to bee colony deaths, such as the destruction and disturbance of habitat, as well as the use of pesticides and parasites.
M-31 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should ban the import of dog and cat fur products into Canada, and make it an offense to mislabel any garment product made from dog or cat fur.
M-32 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should enact legislation to establish a legal regime, mirroring the law enacted in 2008 by the United Kingdom and measures taken by Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Finland, to ensure that binding measures are in place to ensure greater transparency and accountability for sound decision-making in delivering on Canada’s commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, including: (a) prescribing legally binding reduction targets for greenhouse gases for 2030 and 2050 consistent with commitments under the United Nation’s Framework Convention on Climate Change, adopted and ratified by Canada, and targets committed to in the Paris Climate Agreement; (b) prescribing a duty to take measures to reduce or mitigate risks or impacts from climate change; (c) establishing an independent climate advisory committee of experts, appointed by the Governor in Council for a five-year term, mandated to (i) advise the government on measures to meet the targets based on scientifically, technologically and economically sound analysis, including by consulting with other orders of government, experts and the public, (ii) advise the government on measures, including best practices to reduce or mitigate risks or impacts from climate change, (iii) undertake audits, based on progress indicators, of the actions taken by the government to deliver on the prescribed greenhouse gas reduction targets and duties to reduce risks, (iv) submit to Parliament annual progress reports outlining the advice provided, the actions taken, and progress in achieving the prescribed reduction targets and mitigation measures; (d) requiring the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, in consultation with the climate advisory committee, to set binding five-year term carbon budgets which would specify the maximum amount of greenhouse gas emissions permissible in Canada during each budgetary period in order to map the course towards the 2030 and 2050 reduction targets; and (e) imposing a duty on the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to table in both Houses of Parliament annual reports on the government’s climate action and carbon account in relation to the carbon budget for that term, and to publicly respond to the climate advisory committee's annual reports within three months of receipt.
M-33 — September 23, 2020 — Ms. Sidhu (Brampton South) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should: (a) designate November 14 of each year as "Frederick Banting Day"; and (b) recognize that (i) one in four Canadians lives with prediabetes or diabetes, a chronic disease that can result in life-threatening complications if not treated, (ii) Canada, the birthplace of insulin, a hormone that has played a key role in the control of diabetes since being discovered by Frederick Banting, seeks to be a leader in promoting diabetes awareness and education.
M-37 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should amend the Income Tax Act to make the disability tax credit refundable within the meaning of the act.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Melillo (Kenora) — September 28, 2020
M-39 — September 23, 2020 — Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should develop and implement a national natural gas framework to: (a) promote the export of liquified natural gas (LNG); (b) promote the development and use of natural gas in Canada’s rural, remote, northern, and Indigenous communities; (c) promote the development of critical infrastructure, including pipelines, to supply LNG plants; (d) provide investors and job creators with the certainty they require for the private sector to develop critical natural gas and LNG infrastructure, including Canada LNG, the associated Coastal Gaslink pipeline and the project Énergie Saguenay of GNL Québec; and (e) promote Canadian natural gas as a tool to help reduce global emissions.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — March 6, 2020
Mr. Melillo (Kenora) — October 6, 2020
M-40 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should designate the month of September, every year, as National Recovery Awareness Month to recognize and support Canadians recovering from addiction and to demonstrate that recovery from addiction is possible, attainable and sustainable.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) and Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — September 23, 2020
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
M-41 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should take immediate measures to end the current deferral policy governing blood and plasma donations from gay men, men who have sex with men, and transgender women given the current blood shortages during the COVID-19 crisis and the urgency of obtaining plasma donations for research into prevention and treatment of COVID-19, and Canadian Blood Services, Héma-Québec, and Health Canada should replace the current discriminatory policy with a science and behaviour-based policy that protects the integrity of the Canadian blood supply while treating all potential donors with equal dignity and respect.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Melillo (Kenora) — September 28, 2020
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) and Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — October 2, 2020
Mrs. Atwin (Fredericton) — October 6, 2020
Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — October 15, 2020
M-43 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should immediately implement a 1% wealth tax on fortunes over $20 million.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — September 30, 2020
Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — October 15, 2020
M-44 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke) — That, as mandated in section 45 of the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act, which received royal assent on November 6, 2014, the House appoint a special committee to undertake a comprehensive review of the provisions and operation of this act:
(a) that the committee be composed of 12 members, of which six shall be government members, four shall be from the official opposition, one shall be from the Bloc Québécois and one from the New Democratic Party;
(b) that a representative from the Canadian Alliance for Sex Work Law Reform be attached to the committee as an ex officio member, and as such have the right to participate in all meetings, to propose and question witnesses, to participate in drafting the report, and to be compensated for any expenses incurred in fulfilling this role in a manner similar to other members of the committee;
(c) that changes in the membership of the committee shall be effective immediately after notification by the whip has been filed with the Clerk of the House;
(d) that membership substitutions be permitted, if required, in the manner provided for in Standing Order 114(2);
(e) that the members shall be named by their respective whip by depositing with the Clerk of the House the list of their members to serve on the committee no later than September 21, 2020;
(f) that the Clerk of the House shall convene an organization meeting of the said committee for no later than October 2, 2020;
(g) that the committee be chaired by a member of the government party;
(h) that notwithstanding Standing Order 106(2), in addition to the Chair, there be one vice-chair from the official opposition, one vice-chair from the Bloc Québécois and one vice-chair from the New Democratic Party;
(i) that quorum of the committee be as provided for in Standing Order 118 and that the Chair be authorized to hold meetings to receive evidence and to have that evidence printed when a quorum is not present, provided that at least four members are present, including one member of the opposition and one member of the government;
(j) that the committee be granted all of the powers of a standing committee, as provided in the Standing Orders, as well as the power to travel, accompanied by the necessary staff;
(k) that the committee be allowed to meet virtually, if and as required, and have the power to authorize video and audio broadcasting of any or all of its proceedings; and
(l) that within six months after this review is undertaken or within such further time as the House may authorize, the committee present a report on the review to the House, including a statement of any changes the committee recommends.
M-45 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — That, given the unanimous declaration of the House on February 22, 2007, to condemn all forms of human trafficking and slavery, the House: (a) encourage Canadians to raise awareness of the magnitude of modern day slavery in Canada and abroad and to take steps to combat human trafficking; and (b) recognize the 22nd day of February as National Human Trafficking Awareness Day.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Melillo (Kenora) — September 28, 2020
Ms. Larouche (Shefford) — December 9, 2020
M-46 — September 23, 2020 — Ms. Gazan (Winnipeg Centre) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should introduce legislation and work with provincial and territorial governments and Indigenous peoples to ensure that a guaranteed livable basic income (i) accounting for regional differences in living costs, (ii) for all Canadians over the age of 18, including single persons, students, families, seniors, persons with disabilities, temporary foreign workers, permanent residents, and refugee claimants, (iii) paid on a regular basis, (iv) not requiring participation in the labour market, education or training in order to be eligible, (v) in addition to current and future government public services and income supports meant to meet special, exceptional and other distinct needs and goals rather than basic needs, including accessible affordable social housing and expanded health services, replace the Canada Emergency Response Benefit on an ongoing and permanent basis in a concerted effort to eradicate poverty and ensure the respect, dignity and security of all persons in respect of Canada’s domestic and international legal obligations.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — August 12, 2020
Mr. Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York), Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River), Mr. Green (Hamilton Centre) and Ms. Collins (Victoria) — August 17, 2020
Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) and Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East) — August 18, 2020
Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay), Mr. Bachrach (Skeena—Bulkley Valley), Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona), Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), Mr. Harris (St. John's East) and Ms. Ashton (Churchill—Keewatinook Aski) — September 23, 2020
Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke) — September 24, 2020
Mrs. Atwin (Fredericton) — October 7, 2020
Mrs. Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing) — October 19, 2020
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
Ms. Dzerowicz (Davenport) — April 26, 2021
M-47 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should work with the provinces and territories, along with key stakeholders including employers and labour unions, to encourage the adoption of a four day work week across Canada in order to increase employment, boost productivity, lower greenhouse gas emissions, reduce commuting hours, cut business operating costs, facilitate tourism, promote better work-life balance, and improve the health and well-being of workers, all especially important as the Canadian economy recovers from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.
M-48 — September 23, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should immediately implement a universal, comprehensive and public pharmacare program based on the final report of the Hoskins Advisory Council on the Implementation of National Pharmacare as part of Canada's COVID-19 economic response plan given that one in five Canadians were uninsured or underinsured prior to the emergence of COVID-19 and layoffs triggered by the pandemic have left millions of Canadians without access to employer-sponsored drug coverage.
M-49 — September 23, 2020 — Ms. Collins (Victoria) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should recognize that: (a) Canada is facing dual crises of a global pandemic and the climate emergency; (b) even before the pandemic Canadians were struggling with growing inequality and the climate crisis was threatening our communities; (c) Canada is being left behind while other countries make bold investments to build sustainable economies; (d) we have an opportunity to address both the pandemic and the climate crisis by making immediate investments in a just and sustainable recovery that (i) puts people first, (ii) rebuilds an economy that is sustainable and resilient, (iii) invests in the infrastructure we need to fight climate change, (iv) builds livable communities while creating jobs across Canada; and (e) any recovery measures must be tied to (i) directly supporting workers and communities, not CEOs and shareholders, (ii) transitioning to a sustainable economy, (iii) ensuring climate accountability and progress towards our climate targets.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Bachrach (Skeena—Bulkley Valley) — October 5, 2020
M-50 — September 24, 2020 — Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should: (a) create a new Crown corporation called Renewable Canada to accelerate job creation for the economic recovery as well as the necessary transition to renewable energy, by building new geothermal, solar, wind, and tidal power projects, prioritizing projects in Northeast British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Newfoundland and Labrador where new transitional jobs are most needed and where the energy worker skill base already exists; and (b) fund this corporation from the savings gained from ending fossil fuel subsidies.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River), Ms. Collins (Victoria), Mr. Harris (St. John's East), Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), Ms. McPherson (Edmonton Strathcona), Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East) and Mr. Green (Hamilton Centre) — September 25, 2020
Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — September 28, 2020
Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — September 29, 2020
Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay) — October 1, 2020
Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — October 9, 2020
Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) and Mrs. Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing) — October 14, 2020
Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — October 22, 2020
M-51 — October 8, 2020 — Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke) — That, as mandated in section 10 of the Act to Amend the Criminal Code (medical assistance in dying), which received royal assent on June 17, 2016:
(a) the House appoint a special committee to undertake a comprehensive review of the provisions and operation of this act;
(b) the review conducted by the committee include, but not be limited to, issues relating to requests for medical assistance in dying by mature minors, advance requests, requests where mental illness is the sole underlying medical condition, the state of palliative care, and the adequacy of safeguards against pressure on the vulnerable to seek medical assistance in dying;
(c) the committee be composed of 12 members, of which six shall be government members, four shall be from the official opposition, one shall be from the Bloc Québécois and one from the New Democratic Party;
(d) changes in the membership of the committee shall be effective immediately after notification by the whip has been filed with the Clerk of the House;
(e) membership substitutions be permitted, if required, in the manner provided for in Standing Order 114(2);
(f) the members shall be named by their respective whip by depositing with the Clerk of the House the list of their members to serve on the committee no later than October 30, 2020;
(g) the Clerk of the House shall convene an organization meeting of the said committee for no later than November 6, 2020;
(h) the committee be chaired by a member of the government party;
(i) notwithstanding Standing Order 106(2), in addition to the Chair, there be one vice-chair from the official opposition, one vice-chair from the Bloc Québécois and one vice-chair from the New Democratic Party;
(j) the quorum of the committee be as provided for in Standing Order 118, and that the Chair be authorized to hold meetings to receive evidence and to have that evidence printed when a quorum is not present, provided that at least four members are present, including one member of the opposition and one member of the government;
(k) the committee be granted all of the powers of a standing committee, as provided in the Standing Orders, as well as the power to travel, accompanied by the necessary staff;
(l) the committee be allowed to meet virtually, if and as required, and have the power to authorize video and audio broadcasting of any or all of its proceedings; and
(m) within six months after this review is undertaken or within such further time as the House may authorize, the committee present a report on the review to the House, including a statement setting out any changes to the provisions that the committee recommends.
M-52 — October 21, 2020 — Ms. McPherson (Edmonton Strathcona) — That, given provincial governments such as Alberta’s are increasingly privatizing essential health services, it is the opinion of the House that the government should take immediate action to ensure that federal funds distributed for health purposes to provincial and territorial governments are used solely to strengthen and administer publicly delivered, universally accessible health care.
M-53 — November 12, 2020 — Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River) — That:
(a) the House recognize and honour that, (i) Canada, as a nation, has a rich history of resource-dependent rural communities providing the economic prosperity many Canadians have benefited from, (ii) this prosperity has often been at the expense of or specifically excluded local Indigenous peoples and communities, (iii) the future of these resource-dependent communities is at risk due to climate change, the movement of rural residents to urban centres, the loss of ecological diversity and integrity, and the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, (iv) the majority of the landscape in Canada is remote and sparsely populated and rural communities are crucial in our understanding and management of localized climate change impacts; and
(b) in the opinion of the House, for all federal COVID-19 relief and recovery funding, programming and legislation, the government should abide by the following principles: (i) be in harmony with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, (ii) it be applied and distributed equitably by federal riding, geographic region, and province or territory, (iii) prioritize and incentivize projects that reduce or eliminate greenhouse gas emissions or waste, (iv) prioritize and incentivize initiatives that improve the water-retentive capacities of soils and that facilitate the recharge of groundwaters, (v) prioritize and incentivize projects that can be built and managed by local businesses and agencies to create a diversity of local, long-term, well-paying employment opportunities and small business initiatives that keep profits and benefits within the community.
M-54 — November 12, 2020 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should adopt a requirement for tobacco companies to pay an annual fee in order to recover the annual costs of the federal government’s tobacco control strategy, with allocation of the fee to each company being based on market share.
M-55 — November 25, 2020 — Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan) — That the House, in light of the motion adopted by the House on November 18, 2020, respecting foreign state-backed interference and intimidation activities in Canada: (a) reiterate its concern about the presence of significant and sustained foreign interference activities in Canada and its call for a strong government response; (b) call upon federal government ministers to engage with their provincial, territorial, and municipal counterparts to collaboratively respond to the activities of foreign state-controlled or state-affiliated entities as they relate to institutions that fall outside federal jurisdiction; and (c) call upon the government to create new mechanisms of protection and support for Canadians who are targets of foreign state-backed interference and intimidation.
M-56 — November 30, 2020 — Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East) — That the House:
(a) recognize that,
(i) 3,000 new units of rapid housing is not enough when over 235,000 individuals experience homelessness in Canada each year, combined with additional strain brought on by the pandemic,
(ii) Indigenous peoples are 11 times more likely to use a homeless shelter,
(iii) people living in poverty face the greatest barriers for following public health measures and are disproportionately affected by COVID-19,
(iv) the 2017 National Housing Strategy nor any subsequent policy provided specific funding or policies for urban or rural and Indigenous housing; and
(b) call on the government to,
(i) implement an Indigenous-led urban, rural and northern Indigenous strategy,
(ii) accelerate action on Indigenous homelessness,
(iii) increase the supply of stable, safe, affordable housing by building 73,000 new units of housing for urban, rural and northern Indigenous peoples as called for by the Canadian Housing and Renewal Association,
(iv) create a dedicated rapid housing stream for rural, urban and northern Indigenous peoples to provide winter shelter and a place to isolate from COVID-19,
(v) provide support for tenants’ well-being and long-term success with wraparound Indigenous services.
M-57 — January 21, 2021 — Mr. McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood) — That the House:
(a) condemn all forms of human trafficking and slavery;
(b) promote awareness of the magnitude of modern-day slavery in Canada and abroad;
(c) take steps to combat human trafficking; and
(d) call for the designation of February 22 of each year as National Human Trafficking Awareness Day.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — January 25, 2021
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
M-59 — January 21, 2021 — Ms. McPherson (Edmonton Strathcona) — That, given that the House agreed on November 22, 2007, to condemn all forms of human trafficking and slavery:
(a) the House encourage Canadians to raise awareness of the magnitude of modern-day slavery in Canada and abroad; and
(b) in the opinion of the House, the government should (i) take all the necessary steps to combat human trafficking, (ii) designate February 22 as National Human Trafficking Awareness Day.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — January 25, 2021
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
M-63 — February 2, 2021 — Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should: (a) recognize the urgent need for concrete legislative measures to (i) combat the scourge of sexual exploitation of minors, (ii) better protect children and other vulnerable persons from sexual exploitation; and (b) amend, as soon as possible, the provisions of the Criminal Code to implement the four important recommendations contained in the unanimous report of the Select Committee on the Sexual Exploitation of Minors established by the National Assembly of Quebec, namely, (i) the implementation of the consecutive sentencing provision for human trafficking, (ii) adding the crime of sexual exploitation to the proceeds of crime forfeiture mechanism, (iii) eliminating the preliminary inquiry in some sexual exploitation and human trafficking cases, (iv) giving law enforcement more effective legal tools to obtain evidence of sexual crimes committed against minors committed in the cyberspace.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — February 2, 2021
M-65 — February 3, 2021 — Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should introduce legislation to create a guaranteed livable income that is accessible to all Canadians, working with the provincial and territorial governments and Indigenous peoples in a coordinated approach to establish an income floor under which no Canadian can fall, that is adjusted to regional differences in living costs, in addition to current programs, public services and income supports meant to meet distinct needs, including disability supports, accessible and affordable social housing and expanded health services ensuring that the rights of Canadians are respected and meet Canada’s international legal obligations.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
M-66 — February 4, 2021 — Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — That:
(a) the House recognize that,
(i) housing unaffordability is a national crisis affecting every part of Canada,
(ii) 1.8 million Canadian households spend more than 30% of their income on rent, and 800,000 of those households spend more than 50%,
(iii) an estimated 2.4 million Canadian households experienced core housing need in 2020,
(iv) the definition of affordable housing is out of date and out of touch with the economic realities faced by millions of Canadian individuals and families,
(v) Canadian real estate is being inflated due to the financialization and commodification of housing,
(vi) the inflation of the Canadian housing market is exacerbated by our market being used to launder money and as a tax haven for domestic and international investors,
(vii) corporations, numbered companies and real estate investment trusts (REITs) are investing billions of dollars into residential housing stock with the goal of extracting maximum profits,
(viii) REITs inflate the real estate market while benefiting from massive tax exemptions,
(ix) while some parts of Canada have rent controls and/or vacancy controls, there are no national standards to protect renters in Canada,
(x) some of Canada’s current policies for increasing housing stock amount to a transfer of tax dollars to private-for-profit entities, and do nothing to protect existing affordable housing stock; and
(b) in the opinion of the House, the government should,
(i) recognize housing unaffordability and homelessness as twin national crises,
(ii) re-define affordable housing using a better, updated formula,
(iii) remove tax exemptions for REITs, unless they are being used to protect affordable housing units,
(iv) do more to regulate foreign investment in residential real estate,
(v) require restrictive covenants on affordable housing units built with taxpayer subsidies to ensure that those housing units remain affordable,
(vi) create national standards to establish rent and vacancy controls,
(vii) create an empty home tax for foreign and corporate residential property owners that leave buildings and units vacant,
(viii) increase access to affordable properties for Canadians buying homes by regulating investors out of the market for residential real estate priced below median regional prices,
(ix) prioritize funding for non-profit and cooperative housing.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
M-67 — February 11, 2021 — Mr. Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should ensure that any company that has bolstered its bottom line with hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars in funding through the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy is required to return an equal amount that it has either paid in dividends or used to buy back shares.
M-68 — February 11, 2021 — Mr. Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should address rising extreme wealth inequality and generational fairness concerns by implementing: (a) a one-time tax on extreme wealth to help pay for the pandemic response, namely a 3% tax on assets over $10 million, and a 5% tax on assets over $20 million; (b) new tax measures on the transfer of extreme wealth, including an inheritance tax on estates valued at over $5 million; and (c) changes in the tax treatment of investment income to ensure it is treated more equitably in relation to employment income earned by working Canadians.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — February 18, 2021
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — February 22, 2021
M-70 — February 22, 2021 — Mr. Bachrach (Skeena—Bulkley Valley) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should recognize that: (a) the northern residents deduction was created to offset higher costs of living faced by residents in Canada’s remote communities; (b) the deduction contributes to community stability by retaining skilled workers and other residents; (c) designating the prescribed northern zone based solely on latitude arbitrarily excludes many rural and remote communities with high costs of living; (d) it should review the criteria upon which the northern residents deduction is based, with the goal of better reflecting the relative remoteness and costs of living in Canada’s rural and remote communities; and (e) such a review would be best undertaken by a task force empowered to study the issue, consult with communities, and recommend alternative approaches.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Ms. Qaqqaq (Nunavut) and Ms. Ashton (Churchill—Keewatinook Aski) — February 23, 2021
Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — February 24, 2021
Mrs. Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing) — February 26, 2021
M-71 — February 23, 2021 — Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — That:
(a) the House recognize that,
(i) Indigenous peoples have rights and title to their traditional territories and have been stewards of these lands since time immemorial,
(ii) the climate crisis require action on the part of all levels of government and industry,
(iii) the federal government has pledged to plant two billion trees as part of its climate action plan,
(iv) a single old growth tree can absorb far more carbon in a year than an acre of seedlings,
(v) old growth forests are bio-diverse and provide ecosystem services both measurable and beyond what can be measured,
(vi) Indigenous peoples have used plant medicines from the ancient forests that modern medical science is only beginning to understand,
(vii) valley-bottom high productivity old growth ecosystems in British Columbia are endangered,
(viii) of the original 360,000 hectares of valley-bottom high productivity old growth on Vancouver Island and South West mainland BC, only 31,000 hectares or 9% remain today, of those only 9,400 hectares or 2.6% of the original are protected in parks,
(ix) on Southern Vancouver Island, Fairy Creek, the last intact old growth valley not protected as park, is slated to be logged along with the upper Walbran Valley and other remaining pockets of valley-bottom high productivity old growth,
(x) the Canadian old growth boreal forest provide ecosystem services to the planet equal to the Amazon rainforest, including carbon sequestration,
(xi) the majority of Canadians support sustainable harvesting of second and third growth forests, but there is no social license to log the last of the giant old growth trees in valley-bottom high productivity forests, or to destroy their surrounding ecosystems; and
(b) in the opinion of the House, the government should,
(i) work with the provinces and First Nations to put an immediate halt to the logging of endangered old growth ecosystems,
(ii) prioritize and fund the long term protection of endangered old growth forest ecosystems as a key component of Canada’s climate action plan and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples,
(iii) work with First Nations to protect the Canadian boreal forest as part of the climate action plan,
(iv) support value added forestry industry initiatives in partnership with First Nations aimed at ensuring that Canada can have a sustainable and vibrant forestry industry based on the harvesting of second and third growth forests,
(v) ban the export of raw logs and maximize the use of resources for local jobs.
M-72 — February 24, 2021 — Mr. Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should immediately establish an independent commission of inquiry to review all activities of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, to consider the force’s history, including workplace and sexual harassment, systemic racism, use of force, and role in contract policing, and to make recommendations for the future of the force, including with respect to its mandate, structure, culture, and governance.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — February 26, 2021
M-73 — February 24, 2021 — Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should work with the provinces and territories, stakeholders and labour unions to develop and implement a national strategy for the effective re-integration of workers who acquire a mental or physical health impairment while employed and are at risk of losing their job.
M-74 — March 11, 2021 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should invest without delay in the establishment of non-profit alternatives, such as cooperative or non-profit lending circles, to protect low-income and other vulnerable consumers from predatory lending practices and improve access to fair banking options.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — March 12, 2021
M-75 — March 18, 2021 — Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe) — That:
(a) the House recognize that,
(i) young people experience a great deal of stress and their mental health is impacted by them taking on huge debt loads to cover their post-secondary education tuition fees,
(ii) the rising cost of post-secondary education and the pandemic have worsened the impact on the mental health of post-secondary students,
(iii) on average a Canadian student will leave their post-secondary educational institution with $27,000 of debt, and that this debt delays young peoples’ ability to start a family, purchase a home and start the rest of their lives; and
(b) in the opinion of the House, the government should work in collaboration with the provinces and territories to,
(i) establish, develop, and implement a student relief package,
(ii) create short and long-term 50:50 post-secondary education grant matching programs,
(iii) create federal student debt elimination strategies that eliminate student debt at $10,000 per student, $20,000 per student, and $30,000 per student,
(iv) establish annual program values to ensure investments into post-secondary education are adjusted to inflation, enrollment growth, and institutional costs.
M-76 — March 22, 2021 — Ms. McPherson (Edmonton Strathcona) — That the House recognize that,
(i) Canadians cherish our Rocky Mountains and do not want to see the natural landscape and water quality diminished or destroyed by the introduction or continuation of destructive coal mining, coal exploration, or expansion of previous coal mining operations,
(ii) coal mining is a sunsetting industry with limited potential to provide economic benefit or long-term employment, but has significant legacy costs to Canadians,
(iii) coal exploration and development threaten vital fish and wildlife habitat and further endangers species at risk,
(iv) the federal government has an important role to play to ensure resource exploration and development proposals meet the highest standards of consultation and involvement with Indigenous peoples in accordance with section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the TRC 94 Calls to Action,
(v) the failure of the Alberta government to provide adequately environmental stewardship;
and that, in the opinion of the House, the government should amend the Impact Assessment Act as well as all other regulations in place to require that any coal mine expansion be subject to an environmental impact assessment.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — March 25, 2021
M-77 — March 22, 2021 — Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — That:
(a) the House recognize that,
(i) a humanitarian crisis has unfolded in Canada’s long-term care (LTC) homes during the COVID-19 pandemic,
(ii) seniors, residents and staff in LTC are most vulnerable to COVID-19,
(iii) many LTC residents live in inhumane conditions, a longstanding issue, which has been made worse by the pandemic,
(iv) the death and suffering in Canada’s LTC facilities is deplorable,
(v) Canada is known internationally as a caring nation, but that during the pandemic, we often ranked worst among OECD countries for deaths in LTC,
(vi) LTC residents must have the dignity, quality of life and care they deserve,
(b) in the opinion of the House, the government should,
(i) work urgently with the provinces and LTC experts to take immediate life-saving action to get COVID-19 cases to zero in LTC,
(ii) provide proper and adequate supplies of personal protective equipment for staff, family caregivers and residents,
(iii) increase rapid testing at facilities for residents, staff and family caregivers,
(iv) implement a basic care guarantee and increase the number of trained staff in LTC facilities to ensure a minimum of four hours of regulated personal care per day for every resident,
(v) pay LTC staff adequately for their work, and provide benefits and paid sick leave,
(vi) invest in training and education to support ongoing professional development and specialization for LTC workers,
(vii) support unions to better ensure workers’ safety and standards of care for residents and staff,
(viii) support LTC home family councils and ensure they are included in decision making and not kept out of the residences unnecessarily,
(ix) make LTC a publicly insured, core health care service that is accessible and universal,
(x) create a long term care act, modelled after the Canada Health Act that establishes national standards for care and staffing, and mechanisms to enforce these standards in all types of residences and facilities,
(xi) ensure enforcement of standards of care through accountability and penalties, including criminal prosecution,
(xii) end private, for-profit care and transition LTC facilities to non-profit and co-operative management structures and ownership,
(xiii) increase the proportion of LTC investment in community and home-based care from 13 to 35 per cent in order to match the OECD average,
(xiv) work with the provinces to support shifting LTC policy towards innovative community care, such as naturally occurring retirement communities, co-housing models, and enhanced home support programs, to allow people to stay in their own homes as long as possible.
M-78 — March 24, 2021 — Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should initiate a national program for all provincial farmers’ market nutrition coupon programs (FMNCPs) that would match provinces who are already contributing to their FMNCPs, and help provinces that do not have such program by assisting with framework and program development.
M-79 — April 8, 2021 — Ms. Collins (Victoria) — That:
(a) the House recognize that,
(i) the Trans Mountain expansion project poses significant risks to both our environment and our economy,
(ii) a seven-fold increase in tanker traffic would put our coast at risk,
(iii) recent reports from the Canada Energy Regulator and the Parliamentary Budget Officer show that the Trans Mountain expansion project will only be financially viable if the government takes no further action to fight climate change,
(iv) forecasting agencies are predicting the end of growth in oil demand as countries shift to clean energy, and major global oil companies are writing off their oil sands investments,
(v) the cost of the Trans Mountain expansion project has more than doubled to $12.6 billion, putting Canadian tax dollars at risk,
(vi) ambitious investments in the clean economy is required to meet Canada's Paris climate commitments and will create much needed jobs in sectors hard hit by the pandemic and by the downturn in the oil industry; and
(b) in the opinion of the House, the government should reconsider any additional financing for the Trans Mountain expansion project and prioritize investments in clean energy and a just transition for workers.
M-80 — April 8, 2021 — Mr. Arya (Nepean) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should recognize the contributions that Hindu Canadians have made to the socio-economic development of Canada and their services to the Canadian society, the richness of Hindu heritage and its vast contribution to the world of arts and science, astronomy to medicine, and its culture and traditions and the importance of educating and reflecting upon it for future generations by declaring September, every year, Hindu Heritage Month.
M-81 — April 8, 2021 — Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — That, in the opinion of the House, given Canada’s urgent need to transition to a green economy and a more just and equal society, the government should:
(a) recognize the integral role that a revitalized Canada Post can play in a green and just recovery, using its existing infrastructure and expertise; and
(b) adopt the Delivering Community Power proposal for Canada Post that has been put forward by the Canadian Union of Postal Workers, including,
(i) a renewable energy postal fleet,
(ii) charging stations for electric vehicles at post offices,
(iii) postal banking that provides inclusive financial services, especially to those underserved by commercial banks, like in rural and many Indigenous communities,
(iv) door-to-door mail carriers checking in on seniors and people with mobility issues, keeping more people in their own homes for longer,
(v) post offices as community hubs for digital access and social innovation, connecting communities and climate-friendly businesses to customers,
(vi) a consolidated last-mile delivery service that eases congestion in urban centres and reduces the environmental impact of our cities.
M-82 — April 23, 2021 — Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith) — That:
(a) the House recognize that multinational digital corporations, such as social media giants, exploit the personal information of individuals for profit, by
(i) collecting vast amounts of personal information and tracking the preferences, whereabouts, and behaviour of individuals,
(ii) developing algorithms that target said individuals, as well as their families and friends, with individualized advertisements, content, and behavioral manipulation techniques, often without their knowledge,
(iii) employing intentionally addictive techniques to keep individuals on their platforms for more time;
(b) the House further recognize that:
(i) privacy is a fundamental human right under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,
(ii) despite operating globally, multinational digital corporations avoid paying taxes by moving their operational centres to jurisdictions with the lowest tax rates; and
(c) in the opinion of the House, the government should take stronger action to regulate and disincentivize the exploitation of personal data for corporate profit, including by
(i) implementing taxes on personal data collection as well as the advertising revenue of multinational digital corporations,
(ii) working with international partners to develop a coordinated global approach for taxing multinational digital corporations.
M-83 — April 29, 2021 — Mr. Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell) — That, in the opinion of the House, given the fact that access to drug and treatment for Canadians with rare diseases is an ongoing issue, the government should:
(i) work to reduce the approval process for its Priority Review of drug submissions, which is currently set at 180 days,
(ii) ask the Canadian Agency for Drug and Technologies in Health, the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board, and the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance to draft a strategy to expedite the approval of drugs that deal with terminal rare diseases,
(iii) work with the provinces and territories to help identify current barriers to faster drug approval and accessibility.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Mr. Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George) — April 30, 2021

Notices of Motions (Papers)

P-2 — April 14, 2021 — Ms. Rempel Garner (Calgary Nose Hill) — That an order of the House do issue for a copy of all unredacted contracts, or purchase agreements, between the government and Pfizer regarding the procurement of the vaccine manufactured by Pfizer for immunization against the SARS-CoV2 virus, commonly known as COVID-19.

List for the Consideration of Private Members’ Business

The list for the consideration of Private Members’ Business is available on the House of Commons website at the following address: https://www.ourcommons.ca.