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43rd PARLIAMENT, 2nd SESSION

Journals

No. 46

Wednesday, December 9, 2020

2:00 p.m.



The clerk informed the House of the unavoidable absence of the Speaker.

Whereupon, Mr. Stanton (Simcoe North), Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole, took the chair, pursuant to subsection 43(1) of the Parliament of Canada Act.

Prayer
National Anthem
Statements By Members

Pursuant to Standing Order 31, members made statements.

Oral Questions

Pursuant to Standing Order 30(5), the House proceeded to Oral Questions.

Motions

By unanimous consent, it was resolved, — That, given that COVID-19 has disproportionately impacted people who are homeless or unhoused, the House call upon the government, while respecting the jurisdiction of Quebec, the other provinces and Indigenous Nations, to:

(a) recognize that people who are homeless and unhoused, many of whom are Indigenous peoples, seniors, persons with disabilities, and low income people, do not have the resources to fully practice the necessary public health measures as recommended by federal, provincial and territorial officials on how to stay safe during the pandemic;
(b) make substantive investments in both long-term and short-term programs, including low-barrier shelters, transitional housing and permanent supportive housing for those who are chronically unhoused;
(c) put in place an urban Indigenous housing strategy led by Indigenous peoples; and
(d) increase funding for non-governmental organizations that help individuals needing to self-isolate due to COVID-19, including by providing mental health support, addiction services, meal programs and other measures.
Daily Routine Of Business

Tabling of Documents

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. MacAulay (Minister of Veterans Affairs) laid upon the table, — Annual Report 2019-20 of the Office of the Veterans Ombudsman. — Sessional Paper No. 8525-432-10.


Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Ms. Ng (Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade) laid upon the table, — Copy of the Agreement on Trade Continuity between Canada and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. — Sessional Paper No. 8532-432-14.


Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Duclos (President of the Treasury Board) laid upon the table, — Document entitled "Annual Report to Parliament for the 2019 to 2020 Fiscal Year: Federal Regulatory Management Initiatives". — Sessional Paper No. 8525-432-9.


Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:

— Nos. 432-00152, 432-00154 and 432-00159 concerning justice;

— No. 432-00153 concerning Indigenous affairs;

— No. 432-00155 concerning the democratic process;

— Nos. 432-00156, 432-00157 and 432-00158 concerning foreign affairs.


Introduction of Government Bills

Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Ms. Ng (Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade), seconded by Mr. Lametti (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada), Bill C-18, An Act to implement the Agreement on Trade Continuity between Canada and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


Introduction of Private Members' Bills

Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith), seconded by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), Bill C-261, An Act to amend the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (thermal coal), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


Presenting Petitions

Pursuant to Standing Order 36, petitions certified by the Clerk of Petitions were presented as follows:

— by Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith), one concerning the environment (No. 432-00377);
— by Ms. Gladu (Sarnia—Lambton), one concerning justice (No. 432-00378);
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning natural resources and energy (No. 432-00379);
— by Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan), one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00380);
— by Mrs. Jansen (Cloverdale—Langley City), two concerning justice (Nos. 432-00381 and 432-00382);
— by Mr. Fergus (Hull—Aylmer), one concerning social affairs and equality (No. 432-00383), one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00384) and one concerning taxation (No. 432-00385);
— by Mr. Redekopp (Saskatoon West), one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00386) and two concerning justice (Nos. 432-00387 and 432-00388);
— by Mr. Melillo (Kenora), one concerning economics and finance (No. 432-00389), one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00390) and two concerning justice (Nos. 432-00391 and 432-00392);
— by Mr. Shields (Bow River), one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00393);
— by Mr. Kurek (Battle River—Crowfoot), two concerning foreign affairs (Nos. 432-00394 and 432-00395) and two concerning justice (Nos. 432-00396 and 432-00397);
— by Mr. Williamson (New Brunswick Southwest), one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00398) and two concerning justice (Nos. 432-00399 and 432-00400);
— by Mr. Cooper (St. Albert—Edmonton), one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00401);
— by Mr. Vis (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon), one concerning public safety (No. 432-00402), four concerning justice (Nos. 432-00403, 432-00404, 432-00405 and 432-00407) and one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00406).

Questions on the Order Paper

Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the answers to questions Q-170, Q-184 and Q-202 on the Order Paper.


Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into orders for return:
Q-171 — Ms. Alleslev (Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill) — With regard to contracts signed since January 1, 2016, which are not subject to proactive disclosure due to receiving a national security exception (NSE), broken down by year and by department or agency: (a) how many contracts have received an NSE; (b) for which commodities has an NSE been applied; (c) what is the total dollar value of all contracts that have received an NSE; (d) how many of the contracts have a total value (i) under $200,000, (ii) between $200,000 and $1,000,000, (iii) over $1,000,000; and (e) for each NSE signed since January 1, 2020, where an official signed a letter invoking the NSE, what is the (i) date, (ii) name of official, (iii) title of official, (iv) commodity? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-171.

Q-172 — Mr. Warkentin (Grande Prairie—Mackenzie) — With regard to undertakings to allow government employees to work from home as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic since March 1, 2020: (a) what is the total amount of money the government has spent on providing technology resources, including monitors and computer mouses, to employees who are working from home, itemized by date and broken down by department, agency or Crown corporation; (b) what is the total amount of money the government has spent on providing office furniture, including chairs and desks, to employees who are working from home, itemized by date and broken down by department, agency or Crown corporation; (c) what is the total amount of money the government has spent on administrative expenses, such as internet or telecommunications bills, for employees who are working from home, itemized by date and broken down by department, agency or Crown corporation; (d) what is the total number of office chairs provided to federal employees from government warehouses for the purpose of working from home, itemized by date and broken down by department, agency or Crown corporation; and (e) what is the total amount of money the government has spent on the transport, including delivery, of items mentioned in (a) through (d) to employees who are working from home? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-172.

Q-173 — Mr. Seeback (Dufferin—Caledon) — With regard to the chart entitled "Canada's COVID-19 Economic Response Plan - Overview" on the government's website, under the "Related resources" tab of the COVID-19 Economic Response Plan webpage: (a) what is the actual amount of actual expenditures made to date, broken down by each initiative listed on the chart; and (b) what is the number of individuals or organizations who have received funding, broken down by each initiative listed on the chart? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-173.

Q-174 — Mr. Warkentin (Grande Prairie—Mackenzie) — With regard to car and driver services provided to employees of departments, agencies or Crown corporations, as of October 22, 2020, and excluding ministers and other elected officials: (a) how many employees are entitled to a car and driver; and (b) what are the titles of all employees who are entitled to a car and driver? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-174.

Q-175 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — With regard to all government advertising on Facebook, broken down by fiscal year and federal department, agency, Crown corporation, minister's office or other entity from 2009-10 to present: (a) how much was allocated in each departmental budget annually for overall advertising; (b) how much of those allocated funds were spent on Facebook advertising; and (c) how much was spent in total across government on Facebook advertising for each fiscal year from 2009-10? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-175.

Q-176 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — With regard to Canada’s official residences including The Farm, Harrington Lake, Rideau Hall, Stornoway, 7 Rideau Gate and 24 Sussex Drive: what are all telecommunications costs incurred annually since 2010, including, for each fiscal year, (i) the total annual cost per residence, (ii) the type of services provided (e.g. fiberoptic, wireless, other or multiple), (iii) who is the telecom service provider (TSP) and are these under contract, (iv) if the TSP holds a contract, for how long, (v) inventory of type of services, products, channels or stations, packages provided, (vi) amount of downloaded content, (vii) speed of downloaded content? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-176.

Q-177 — Mr. Masse (Windsor West) — With regard to the CRTC Broadband Fund, the Universal Broadband Fund and Connect to Innovate: (a) for each program and for each fiscal year it has been in operation, how much money was (i) allocated for the year, (ii) disbursed by the province and territory; (b) for each program and for each fiscal year it has been in operation, how many days elapsed between the application date and approval for each successful application; (c) for each program and for each fiscal year it has been in operation, how many days have elapsed since the submission of completed applications still under consideration; and (d) for each program, (i) how many applications have been submitted since applications opened, (ii) how many have been approved? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-177.

Q-178 — Mrs. Vecchio (Elgin—Middlesex—London) — With regard to government departments and agencies refusing to deem processing requests made under Access to Information and Privacy Act (ATIP) an essential service during the pandemic: (a) which department and agencies have deemed processing ATIP requests and producing responses an essential service and continue to process requests; (b) which departments and agencies refused to deem processing ATIP requests and producing responses an essential service; (c) for each department and agency in (b), did the minister responsible approve this refusal or decision and, if so, on what date did the minister approve the refusal or decision; and (d) of the departments in (b), which ones have resumed processing requests and producing responses and on what date did this the resumption occur? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-178.

Q-179 — Mrs. Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing) — With regard to Indigenous communities and the COVID-19 pandemic: (a) how much money has been spent through the Indigenous Community Support Fund, broken down by (i) province or territory, (ii) recipient community, (iii) date of application, (iv) date of disbursement; (b) for each day between February 1 and May 31, 2020, what telephone calls did the Minister of Indigenous Services, the deputy minister and any associate or assistant deputy ministers make to or hold with Indigenous communities, representative organizations (including National Indigenous Organizations, tribal councils, and major political organizations, such as the Nishnawbe Aski Nation) regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, broken down by (i) departmental official, (ii) day, (iii) topic, (iv) organization or community; (c) how many ventilators were available in Indigenous communities in March 2020, and how many are available now; (d) how many ventilators is the Department of Indigenous Services ready to transfer to Indigenous communities on an urgent basis, if needed; (e) how many isolation tents did the Department of Indigenous Services have available in March 2020, and how many does it have available now; (f) what is the daily patient capacity of air ambulance services funded by the Department of Indigenous Services; (g) how much personal protective equipment expressed in shipments and in units has been sent in total to Indigenous communities, broken down further by province and date sent; and (h) how much funding has been disbursed to Indigenous organizations and communities providing services to Indigenous peoples in urban centres or off reserve, broken down by (i) province or territory, (ii) recipient community or organization, (iii) date of application, (iv) date of disbursement? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-179.

Q-180 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — With regard to the Supplementary Estimates (A), 2020–21, with $48,710,504 in funding for communications and marketing (COVID-19) under Vote 1a, and $7,699,338 in funding to support regional presence, stabilize and enhance Privy Council Office capacity and the transfer of exempt staff in ministers’ regional offices under Vote 1a, requested for the Privy Council Office, broken down for each source of funding: how was the whole amount of this funding used, broken down by line item and expense? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-180.

Q-181 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), the Liechtenstein leaks and the Bahamas Leaks: (a) how many Canadian taxpayers were identified in the documents obtained, broken down by information leak and type of taxpayer, that is (i) an individual, (ii) a corporation, (iii) a partnership or trust; (b) how many audits did the CRA launch following the identification of taxpayers in (a), broken down by information leak; (c) of the audits in (b), how many were referred to the CRA’s Criminal Investigations Program, broken down by information leak; (d) how many of the investigations in (c) were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, broken down by information leak; (e) how many of the investigations in (d) resulted in a conviction, broken down by information leak; and (f) what was the sentence imposed for each conviction in (e), broken down by information leak? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-181.

Q-182 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — With regard to the Offshore Tax Informant Program, since fiscal year 2015-16: (a) how many calls have been received; (b) how many files have been opened based on information received from informants; (c) what is the total amount of the awards paid to informants; (d) what is the total amount recovered by the Canada Revenue Agency; (e) how many current investigations are the result of information received through the program; and (f) how much money is involved in the current investigations? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-182.

Q-183 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — With regard to negotiations between Canada and the United Kingdom toward a trade agreement: (a) how does the government define the terms (i) transitional trade agreement, (ii) comprehensive trade agreement; (b) when did negotiations between Canada and the United Kingdom begin for each type of agreement; (c) how many times and on what dates have officials from Canada and the United Kingdom met to discuss terms for each type of agreement; and (d) for each of these meetings, which Canadian officials were present? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-183.

Q-185 — Mr. Barlow (Foothills) — With regard to expenditures made by the government since December 1, 2019, under government-wide object code 3259 (Miscellaneous expenditures not elsewhere classified), or a similar code if the department uses another system: what are the details of each expenditure, including the (i) vendor name, (ii) amount, (iii) date, (iv) description of goods or services provided, including volume, (v) file number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-185.

Q-186 — Mr. Barlow (Foothills) — With regard to expenditures on social media influencers, including any contracts which would use social media influencers as part of a public relations campaign, since December 1, 2019: (a) what are the details of all such expenditures, including (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) campaign description, (iv) date of contract, (v) name or handle of influencer; and (b) for each campaign that paid an influencer, was there a requirement to make public as part of a disclaimer the fact that the influencer was being paid by the government and, if not, why not? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-186.

Q-187 — Mr. Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George) — With regard to the government's response to the Federal Communications Commission of the United States setting up the 988 telephone number as a National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and for mental health emergencies: what is the current timeline regarding when the 988 telephone number will be set up in Canada for a similar purpose? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-187.

Q-188 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — With regard to the Safe Return to Class Fund: (a) how much money has been spent through the fund, broken down by (i) province or territory, (ii) date of application, (iii) date of disbursement; (b) what are the details of all applications received for the fund, including the (i) amount requested, (ii) project description, (iii) province or territory of applicant; and (c) how many applications were rejected, broken down by (i) province or territory, (ii) amount requested, (iii) project description, (iv) reason for refusal? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-188.

Q-189 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — With regard to the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS), the Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility (LEEFF) and audits by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) into tax evasion and aggressive tax avoidance, since March 11, 2020, and broken down by the CEWS and LEEFF: (a) how many audits has the CRA conducted to ensure companies are not committing tax evasion and aggressive tax avoidance, broken down by number of companies; (b) of the companies audited by the CRA in (a), how many have benefited from support measures and how many have been refused support because of tax fraud or aggressive tax avoidance; (c) how many pre-payment reviews have been conducted; (d) of the applications reviewed in (c), how many were refused in relation to the total pre-payment verifications conducted; (e) how many post-payment reviews have been conducted; and (f) of the reviews conducted in (e), how many companies had to refund the money received in relation to the total post-payment reviews conducted, and what is the total amount of money refunded? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-189.

Q-190 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — With regard to the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS), the Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility (LEEFF) and Canadian businesses listed in the “Panama Papers” and the “Paradise Papers,” broken down by the CEWS and the LEEFF: (a) how many businesses benefited from the CEWS and the LEEFF; (b) for each of the businesses listed in (a), what was the total amount received; and (c) for each of the businesses listed in (a), was any screening carried out before or after the payment was made? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-190.

Q-191 — Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — With regard to the national risk assessment model (NRAM) used by the International and Large Business Directorate of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), from fiscal year 2011-12 to date: (a) how many taxpayers, considered to be at high risk of non-compliance, are subject to in-depth examination, broken down by (i) fiscal year, (ii) category of taxpayer; (b) what is the list of indicators that help auditors detect potential aggressive tax planning files; (c) what steps are being taken to assess the effectiveness of the NRAM in detecting aggressive tax planning; and (d) what deficiencies have been identified by the CRA in its most recent ongoing evaluation of the NRAM? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-191.

Q-192 — Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — With regard to aggressive tax planning schemes identified by the Canada Revenue Agency, from fiscal year 2011-12 to the present: (a) what are the aggressive tax planning schemes identified by the agency; and (b) what is the estimated total foregone tax revenue, broken down by aggressive tax planning scheme? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-192.

Q-193 — Mr. Scheer (Regina—Qu'Appelle) — With regard to the government’s announcement on October 1, 2020, regarding the Canada Infrastructure Bank’s three-year plan: (a) what specific modelling, if any, did the government use to substantiate its claim that the plan will create 60,000 jobs; (b) who conducted the modelling in (a); (c) what were the projections from the modelling; (d) what are the details of all documents sent to or received by the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, her office or her deputy minister concerning the October 1 announcement, including the (i) sender, (ii) recipient, (iii) date, (iv) title, (v) format (email, memorandum, etc.), (vi) summary of contents, (vii) file number; and (e) what are the details of all documents sent to or received by the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, her office or her deputy minister concerning or that refer to the Canada Infrastructure Bank, since January 1, 2020, including the (i) sender, (ii) recipient, (iii) date, (iv) title, (v) format (email, memorandum, etc.), (vi) summary of contents, (vii) file number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-193.

Q-194 — Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency, between fiscal years 2009-10 and 2018-19, broken down by fiscal year: a) how much was spent on training; and b) how much was spent on criminal investigations? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-194.

Q-195 — Mr. Scheer (Regina—Qu'Appelle) — With regard to government-funded infrastructure projects: (a) what is the complete list of projects the government funded that have been completed since January 1, 2020; (b) what are the details of all projects in (a), including the (i) expected date of completion, (ii) location, (iii) federal riding, (iv) project title or summary, (v) total federal contribution, (vi) date when the project began; (c) what is the complete list of all projects scheduled to be completed in the 2021 calendar year; and (d) what are the details of all projects in (c), including (i) expected date of completion, (ii) location, (iii) federal riding, (iv) project title or summary, (v) total federal contribution, (vi) date when the project began? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-195.

Q-196 — Ms. Collins (Victoria) — With regard to the Department of Crown-Indigenous and Northern Affairs’ nutrition programs, including but not limited to Nutrition North, for the fiscal years of 2010-11 to 2020-21, broken down by fiscal year: (a) how much money was committed to these programs and, if the final cost is not available, what is the best estimate of the cost; (b) how much of the committed money was left unspent and, if the final cost is not available, what is the best estimate of the cost; (c) what products were bought, broken down by (i) subsidy level, (ii) food type each fiscal year; (d) for each program, who was consulted, if anyone, to set subsidy levels or otherwise contribute to the programs development; and (e) for each program, what nutrition data and targets were being used to determine program funding? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-196.

Q-197 — Ms. Collins (Victoria) — With regard to all federal funding committed to the creation and maintenance of housing stock in Nunavut, for each fiscal year from 2011-12 to 2020-21: (a) what was the total amount committed; (b) what was the total amount spent or best approximation; (c) how much new housing stock was created in Nunavut; and (d) what advocates, consultant lobbyists or business representatives, individuals or other organizations consulted with the relevant ministers regarding housing investments in Nunavut? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-197.

Q-198 — Ms. Collins (Victoria) — With regard to the direct delivery of mental health services and benefits for communities within Nunavut, including community-based mental health services for Inuit communities, non-insured drugs and short-term mental health crisis counselling for recognized Inuit people through the Non-Insured Health Benefits Program, addiction prevention, treatment and aftercare programs, mental health, emotional and cultural support services and transportation services to eligible former Indian residential school students, basic social services for Inuit communities, including income supports, home care services, and family violence prevention programs and services and the National Inuit Suicide Prevention Strategy, for the fiscal years from 2010-11 to 2020-21: (a) how much money was committed to these programs for each fiscal year, broken down by program; (b) what was the total spent and, if the final cost is not available, what is the best estimate of the cost for each fiscal year, broken down by program; (c) for each fiscal year of the programs, who was consulted, if anyone was consulted, to set subsidy levels or otherwise contribute to the programs development; and (d) for each year of the programs, what data and targets were being used to determine program funding? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-198.

Q-199 — Ms. Collins (Victoria) — With regard to RCMP operations in Nunavut, broken down by fiscal year from 2010-11 to 2020-21: (a) how much was spent on RCMP operations in the territory; (b) how much was spent on Inuit cultural training for RCMP officers who operated in the territory; (c) how many hours of cultural training were conducted; (d) how many officers were operating in Nunavut; (e) how much was spent on overtime for RCMP officers who were deployed to Nunavut; (f) how many complaints did the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP (CRCC) receive in Nunavut; (g) how many complaints were dismissed without being investigated; and (h) for requests for review in which the CRCC is not satisfied with the RCMP’s report, how many interim reports have been provided to complainants for response and input on recommended actions? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-199.

Q-200 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to the government’s capital expenditures on drinking water and wastewater infrastructure on reserve, and Indigenous Services Canada and its predecessors' expenditures on maintenance and operations for drinking water and wastewater infrastructure on reserve: (a) what amount has been allocated, broken down by program and by year (and, where applicable, by region), over the last five years; (b) what amount has been spent, broken down by program and by year (and, where applicable, by region), over the last five years; (c) over the past five years, how many boil water advisories have been active month to month; (d) over the past five years, which reserves have had water and wastewater infrastructure upgraded or built and what were they; (e) what are the companies that have received contracts to do the water and wastewater work on reserves; (f) where there any issues or problems in terms of fulfilling the contract and, if so, what were they; (g) out of the reserves that have had water and wastewater infrastructure built or repaired in the past five years, how many of them have had water issues, either with infrastructure or other issues, that resulted in renewed boil water advisories; (h) if so, which reserves, when did it occur and how long have they lasted; and (i) how long, according to the budgetary expectations, will it take to complete the government's promise to eliminate boil water advisories on First Nations reserves, based on the current level of funding? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-200.

Q-201 — Mr. Harris (St. John's East) — With regard to the demographics of the staff of the Correctional Service of Canada: what percentage of correctional officers self-identify as (i) Indigenous, (ii) Black, (iii) another visible minority, broken down by region (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario, Prairies, and Pacific)? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-201.

Q-203 — Mr. Harris (St. John's East) — With regard to the demographics of the RCMP: (a) what percentage of RCMP members self-identify as (i) Indigenous, (ii) Black, (iii) from another visible minority; (b) what percentage of RCMP staff self-identify as (i) Indigenous, (ii) Black, (iii) from another visible minority; (c) what percentage of RCMP members identify as (i) female, (ii) male, (iii) other; and (d) what percentage of RCMP staff identify as (i) female, (ii) male, (iii) other? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-203.

Q-204 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to surveillance technologies and their procurement, study, and use by federal government institutions: (a) what direct contacts (i.e. phone calls, emails, or in-person meetings) have taken place between ministers and public servants at the deputy minister, assistant deputy minister, chief of staff or senior policy advisor level or equivalent, and Palantir, Clearview AI and any of their respective subsidiaries, and for each such instance, what was the date, the method of contact, the subject matter discussed and the job title of any public servants present for it; (b) has the government concluded any contracts, contribution agreements or other formal or informal agreements with Palantir, Clearview AI and any of their respective subsidiaries, and, if so (i) with which institution, (ii) for what purpose, product or intended outcome, (iii) beginning when, (iv) what is the value of the contract, contribution agreement or other agreement; (c) do any government institutions (including departments and branches of agencies and Crown corporations) use data analytic services or software in modeling or predicting human behaviour, such as predictive policing, and, if so, (i) with which institution, (ii) for what purpose, product or intended outcome, (iii) beginning when, (iv) what is the value of the contract, contribution agreement or other agreement; (d) what government institutions (including departments and branches of agencies and Crown corporations) are currently or are planning to start using facial recognition technology and (i) how long have they been using it, (ii) what are they using it for, (iii) how often do they use it, (iv) what suppliers (companies) are they using, (v) what is the value of any related contracts or agreements; and (e) have there been any privacy breaches related to this technology or uses that have been deemed improper? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-204.

Q-205 — Mr. Harris (St. John's East) — With regard to the use of force by RCMP members in the course of their duty: (a) how many interactions between members of the RCMP and members of the public occurred in each of the years from 2000 to 2020, inclusively, that resulted in the (i) death, (ii) bodily injury, of a person, whether such death occurred immediately or subsequent to the incident or while in police custody; and (b) for each incident, (i) what was the date, (ii) did the incident result in the injury, however minor, or death of the detained person, (iii) what was the province where the incident took place, (iv) which RCMP division was involved, (v) what was the community within the province where the incident occurred, or if the community is not possible, the RCMP detachment responsible for the geographic region where the incident occurred, (vi) did the incident take place in public, in a private home or other building, an RCMP vehicle, in an RCMP detachment building, or in an RCMP cell, (vii) was the RCMP acting in a contract policing role, (viii) what was the race, gender, sex, age of the person injured or deceased, (ix) was medical attention sought, (x) was an investigation launched, (xi) if an investigation was launched, what was the name of the investigating agency, (xii) what was the outcome of any of the investigations, including the date thereof, and whether any charges were recommended or laid? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-205.
Government Orders

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Lametti (Minister of Justice), seconded by Mrs. Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue), — That Bill C-7, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (medical assistance in dying), be now read a third time and do pass.

The debate continued.

Private Members' Business

At 5:31 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 30(7), the House proceeded to the consideration of Private Members' Business.

The order was read for the second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage of Bill C-226, An Act to amend the Canadian Multiculturalism Act (non-application in Quebec).

Mr. Thériault (Montcalm), seconded by Ms. Gaudreau (Laurentides—Labelle), moved, — That the bill be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage.

Debate arose thereon.

Pursuant to Standing Order 93(1), the order was dropped to the bottom of the order of precedence on the Order Paper.

Returns and Reports Deposited with the Clerk of the House

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(1), a paper deposited with the Clerk of the House was laid upon the table as follows:

— by Mr. Lametti (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada) — Charter Statement — Bill C-13, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (single event sport betting), pursuant to the Department of Justice Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. J-2, sbs. 4.2(1). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-432-1232-13. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights)

Adjournment Proceedings

At 6:31 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 38(1), the question “That this House do now adjourn” was deemed to have been proposed.

After debate, the question was deemed to have been adopted.

Accordingly, at 7:00 p.m., the Deputy Speaker adjourned the House until tomorrow at 10:00 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 24(1).