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HOUSE OF COMMONS OF CANADA
42nd PARLIAMENT, 1st SESSION

Journals

No. 44

Thursday, April 21, 2016

10:00 a.m.



Prayer
Daily Routine Of Business

Tabling of Documents

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:

— No. 421-00112 concerning sex selection. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-25-03;

— Nos. 421-00115 and 421-00126 concerning impaired driving. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-7-05.


Presenting Reports from Committees

Mr. Bagnell (Yukon), from the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented the Eighth Report of the Committee (changes to the Standing Orders). — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-27.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meeting No. 16) was tabled.


Mr. May (Cambridge), from the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, presented the First Report of the Committee (Main Estimates 2016-17 — Vote 1 under Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Vote 1 under Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, and Votes 1 and 5 under Employment and Social Development). — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-28.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 5 and 6) was tabled.


Introduction of Private Members' Bills

Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou), seconded by Ms. Ashton (Churchill—Keewatinook Aski), Bill C-262, An Act to ensure that the laws of Canada are in harmony with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


Motions

By unanimous consent, it was resolved, — That the Eighth Report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented earlier today, be concurred in.


Presenting Petitions

Pursuant to Standing Order 36, petitions certified by the Clerk of Petitions were presented as follows:

— by Mr. Ouellette (Winnipeg Centre), one concerning health care services (No. 421-00195);

— by Mr. Shipley (Lambton—Kent—Middlesex), two concerning unborn children (Nos. 421-00196 and 421-00197);

— by Mr. Bagnell (Yukon), one concerning the electoral system (No. 421-00198) and one concerning genetic engineering (No. 421-00199).


Questions on the Order Paper

Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the return to the following question made into an Order for Return:

Q-70 — Mr. Stewart (Burnaby South) — With regard to the National Energy Board’s review of the Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project and the interim measures for pipeline reviews announced by the government on January 27, 2016: (a) how many Canadians applied to participate in the National Energy Board’s review of the Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project, broken down by (i) individuals, groups, and authorized representatives, (ii) province and territory, (iii) whether they wished to participate as a commenter or as an intervenor, (iv) whether they were “directly affected” by the proposed project or had relevant information or expertise; (b) of those Canadians identified in (a), how many were accepted by the National Energy Board to participate as intervenors, broken down by (i) individuals, groups, and authorized representatives, (ii) province and territory, (iii) whether they wished to participate as a commenter or as an intervenor, (iv) whether they were “directly affected” by the proposed project or had relevant information or expertise; (c) of those Canadians identified in (a), how many were accepted by the National Energy Board to participate as commenters, broken down by (i) individuals, groups, and authorized representatives, (ii) province or territory, (iii) whether they wished to participate as a commenter or as an intervenor, (iv) whether they were “directly affected” by the proposed project or had relevant information or expertise; (d) of those Canadians identified in (a), how many were rejected by the National Energy Board from participating either as a commenter or as an intervenor, broken down by (i) individuals, groups, and authorized representatives, (ii) province and territory, (iii) whether they wished to participate as a commenter or as an intervenor, (iv) whether they were “directly affected” by the proposed project or had relevant information or expertise; (e) of those Canadians identified in (d) who were rejected from participating by National Energy Board, will their applications be reconsidered as part of interim review measures for the Trans Mountain Expansion Project announced by the government on January 27, 2016; (f) of those Canadians identified in (d) who were rejected from participating by National Energy Board, will they have an opportunity to apply to participate in the interim review measures for the Trans Mountain Expansion Project announced by the government on January 27, 2016; (g) of those Canadians identified in (d) who were rejected from participating by National Energy Board, will their views and expertise be solicited by the “Ministerial Representative” appointed by the government to “engage communities, including Indigenous communities potentially affected by the project, to seek their views and report back to the Minister of Natural Resources”; (h) of those Canadians identified in (b) who were accepted to participate by National Energy Board as intervenors, will the government provide funding for these individuals or organizations to present evidence and cross-examine as part of the interim review measures; (i) do the interim review measures alter, in any way, the current legislated time limit of May 20, 2016, for the National Energy Board to issue its report on the Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project to the Governor in Council; and (j) as a result of the interim review measures, can any amendments be made to the National Energy Board’s final report after it has been issued to the Governor in Council? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-70.

Business of Supply

The Order was read for the consideration of the Business of Supply.

Ms. Brosseau (Berthier—Maskinongé), seconded by Ms. Quach (Salaberry—Suroît), moved, — That, since the government is signing trade agreements that are undermining supply management and that will have a negative impact on the Canadian dairy industry, the House: (a) recognize the magnitude of the economic losses to Canadian dairy producers from the importation of diafiltered milk from the United States, which totalled $220 million in 2015; (b) recognize that each day of government inaction contributes to the disappearance of a steadily increasing number of family farms across the country; (c) recognize that the entire industry is standing together to call for the problem to be resolved immediately; and (d) call upon the government to keep its election promises and honour the commitments made since the start of its mandate by immediately enforcing the compositional standards for cheese for all Canadian processors.

Debate arose thereon.

Statements By Members

Pursuant to Standing Order 31, Members made statements.

Oral Questions

Pursuant to Standing Order 30(5), the House proceeded to Oral Questions.

motions

By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, at the conclusion of today's debate on the opposition motion in the name of the Member for Berthier—Maskinongé, all questions necessary to dispose of the motion be deemed put and a recorded division deemed requested and deferred until Tuesday, May 3, 2016, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.

Business of Supply

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. Brosseau (Berthier—Maskinongé), seconded by Ms. Quach (Salaberry—Suroît), in relation to the Business of Supply.

The debate continued.

At 5:15 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 81(16), the Speaker interrupted the proceedings.

Pursuant to Order made earlier today, the question was deemed put on the motion and the recorded division was deemed requested and deferred until Tuesday, May 3, 2016, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.

Private Members' Business

At 5:16 p.m., by unanimous consent, the House proceeded to the consideration of Private Members' Business.

The Order was read for the second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights of Bill C-242, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (inflicting torture).

Mr. Fragiskatos (London North Centre), seconded by Mrs. Shanahan (Châteauguay—Lacolle), moved, — That the Bill be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

Debate arose thereon.

The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to.

Accordingly, Bill C-242, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (inflicting torture), was read the second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

Adjournment Proceedings

At 6:12 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 38(1), the question “That this House do now adjourn'' was deemed to have been proposed.

After debate, the question was deemed to have been adopted.

Accordingly, at 6:41 p.m., the Speaker adjourned the House until tomorrow at 10:00 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 24(1).