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HOUSE OF COMMONS OF CANADA
42nd PARLIAMENT, 1st SESSION

Journals

No. 372

Monday, January 28, 2019

11:00 a.m.



Prayer
Vacancies

The Speaker informed the House that a vacancy had occurred in the representation in the House of Commons, for the Electoral District of Nanaimo—Ladysmith, in the Province of British Columbia, by reason of the resignation of Ms. Sheila Malcolmson, and that, pursuant to paragraph 25(1)(b) of the Parliament of Canada Act, he had addressed, on Monday, January 7, 2019, his warrant to the Chief Electoral Officer for the issue of a writ for the election of a member to fill the vacancy.

Private Members' Business

At 11:06 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 30(7), the House proceeded to the consideration of Private Members' Business.

Mr. Van Kesteren (Chatham-Kent—Leamington), seconded by Mr. Eyking (Sydney—Victoria), moved, — That, in the opinion of the House, in recognition of the sacrifices made by Canadians in the liberation of the Netherlands, as well as the contributions made to Canada by those of Dutch heritage, the government should recognize every May 5 as Dutch Heritage Day to honour this unique bond. (Private Members' Business M-207)

Debate arose thereon.

Pursuant to Standing Order 93(1), the Order was dropped to the bottom of the order of precedence on the Order Paper.

Government Orders

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change), seconded by Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons), — That a Message be sent to the Senate to acquaint Their Honours that, in relation to Bill C-57, An Act to amend the Federal Sustainable Development Act, the House:

agrees with amendments 1 and 3 made by the Senate;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 2 because the amendment seeks to legislate employment matters which are beyond the policy intent of the bill, whose purpose is to make decision-making related to sustainable development more transparent and accountable to Parliament.

The debate continued.

Statements By Members

Pursuant to Standing Order 31, Members made statements.

Certificates of Election

The Speaker informed the House that the Clerk had received from the Chief Electoral Officer a certificate of the election of Mr. Barrett (Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes).

Mr. Barrett (Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes), having taken and subscribed the oath required by law, took his seat in the House.

Oral Questions

Pursuant to Standing Order 30(5), the House proceeded to Oral Questions.

Motions

By unanimous consent, it was resolved, — That, given the enormous cultural significance of hockey in Canada, the House encourage the Hockey Hall of Fame to induct Paul Henderson in recognition of his incredible contribution to Canadian hockey and its history.

Daily Routine Of Business

Tabling of Documents

The Speaker laid upon the Table, — Report of the Parliamentary Budget Officer entitled "PBO and Finance Canada Long-term Projection Comparison" for the year 2019, pursuant to the Parliament of Canada Act, R.S., 1985, c. P-1, sbs. 79.2(2). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-1119-28.


The Speaker laid upon the Table, — Report of the Parliamentary Budget Officer entitled "Costing 2018 Fall Economic Statement and Off-Cycle Measures" for the year 2019, pursuant to the Parliament of Canada Act, R.S., 1985, c. P-1, sbs. 79.2(2). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-1119-29.


Pursuant to Standing Order 79(3), the Speaker read the following Message from Her Excellency the Governor General, presented by Mrs. Philpott (President of the Treasury Board):

Message on Estimates
Her Excellency the Governor General transmits to the House of Commons the Supplementary Estimates (B) of sums required for the public service of Canada in the fiscal year ending on March 31, 2019, and in accordance with section 54 of the Constitution Act, 1867, recommends those Estimates to the House of Commons.

Mrs. Philpott (President of the Treasury Board) laid upon the Table, — Document entitled "Supplementary Estimates (B), 2018-19" (USB key included). — Sessional Paper No. 8520-421-270.

Pursuant to Standing Order 81(5), the Supplementary Estimates (B) for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2019, were deemed referred to the several standing committees of the House as follows:

(1) To the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics

Office of the Senate Ethics Officer, Vote 1b

(2) To the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage

Department of Canadian Heritage, Votes 1b and 5b

(3) To the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration

Department of Citizenship and Immigration, Votes 1b, 10b and 15b

(4) To the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development

Parks Canada Agency, Vote 1b

(5) To the Standing Committee on Finance

Canada Revenue Agency, Votes 1b and 5b

Department of Finance, Votes 1b, L15b, L20b and L25b

(6) To the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans

Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Votes 1b and 10b

(7) To the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development

Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, Votes 1b, 10b, 15b, 20b and L25b

(8) To the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates

Department of Public Works and Government Services, Votes 1b, 5b and L10b

Shared Services Canada, Votes 1b and 5b

Treasury Board Secretariat, Votes 1b, 10b, 15b and 30b

(9) To the Standing Committee on Health

Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Votes 1b and 5b

Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Vote 5b

Public Health Agency of Canada, Vote 10b

(10) To the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities

Department of Employment and Social Development, Votes 1b, 5b and 10b

(11) To the Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Canadian High Arctic Research Station, Vote 1b

Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Votes 1b and 10b

Department of Indigenous Services Canada, Votes 1b and 10b

(12) To the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, Vote 5b

Canadian Tourism Commission, Vote 1b

Department of Industry, Votes 1b and 10b

National Research Council of Canada, Vote 10b

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Vote 5b

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Vote 5b

Statistics Canada, Vote 1b

(13) To the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada, Vote 1b

Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, Vote 1b

(14) To the Standing Joint Committee on the Library of Parliament

Library of Parliament, Vote 1b

(15) To the Standing Committee on National Defence

Communications Security Establishment, Vote 1b

Department of National Defence, Votes 1b and 5b

(16) To the Standing Committee on Natural Resources

Department of Natural Resources, Votes 1b and 10b

National Energy Board, Vote 1b

(17) To the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

Leaders' Debates Commission, Vote 1b

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, Vote 1b

(18) To the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

Correctional Service of Canada, Vote 1b

Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Vote 5b

Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Votes 1b, 5b and 10b

(19) To the Standing Committee on the Status of Women

Department for Women and Gender Equality, Votes 1b and 5b

(20) To the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

Department of Transport, Votes 1b, 5b, 10b and 15b

Office of Infrastructure of Canada, Vote 10b

The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc., Vote 1b

VIA Rail Canada Inc., Vote 1b

(21) To the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

Department of Veterans Affairs, Vote 5b


Pursuant to Standing Order 79(3), the Speaker read the following Message from Her Excellency the Governor General, presented by Mrs. Philpott (President of the Treasury Board):

Message on Estimates
Her Excellency the Governor General transmits to the House of Commons the Interim Estimates of sums required for the public service of Canada in the fiscal year ending on March 31, 2020, and in accordance with section 54 of the Constitution Act, 1867, recommends those Estimates to the House of Commons.

Mrs. Philpott (President of the Treasury Board) laid upon the Table, — Document entitled "Interim Estimates for the year 2019-20" (USB key included). — Sessional Paper No. 8520-421-271.

Pursuant to Standing Order 81(6), the Interim Estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2020, were deemed referred to the several standing committees of the House as follows:

(1) To the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics

Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying, Vote 1

Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, Vote 1

Office of the Senate Ethics Officer, Vote 1

Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada, Votes 1 and 5

(2) To the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food

Canadian Dairy Commission, Vote 1

Canadian Grain Commission, Vote 1

Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Votes 1, 5 and 10

(3) To the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage

Canada Council for the Arts, Vote 1

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Votes 1, 5 and 10

Canadian Museum for Human Rights, Vote 1

Canadian Museum of History, Vote 1

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Vote 1

Canadian Museum of Nature, Vote 1

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, Vote 1

Department of Canadian Heritage, Votes 1 and 5

Library and Archives of Canada, Votes 1 and 5

National Arts Centre Corporation, Vote 1

National Capital Commission, Votes 1 and 5

National Film Board, Vote 1

National Gallery of Canada, Votes 1 and 5

National Museum of Science and Technology, Vote 1

Telefilm Canada, Vote 1

The National Battlefields Commission, Vote 1

(4) To the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration

Department of Citizenship and Immigration, Votes 1, 5 and 10

Immigration and Refugee Board, Vote 1

(5) To the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, Votes 1 and 5

Department of the Environment, Votes 1, 5 and 10

Parks Canada Agency, Votes 1 and 5

(6) To the Standing Committee on Finance

Canada Revenue Agency, Votes 1 and 5

Department of Finance, Votes 1 and 5

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada, Vote 1

Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions, Vote 1

(7) To the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans

Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Votes 1, 5 and 10

(8) To the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development

Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and L25

International Development Research Centre, Vote 1

International Joint Commission (Canadian Section), Vote 1

(9) To the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates

Canada Post Corporation, Vote 1

Canada School of Public Service, Vote 1

Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat, Vote 1

Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board, Vote 1

Department of Public Works and Government Services, Votes 1 and 5

Office of the Governor General's Secretary, Vote 1

Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer, Vote 1

Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner, Vote 1

Privy Council Office, Vote 1

Public Service Commission, Vote 1

Senate, Vote 1

Shared Services Canada, Votes 1 and 5

Treasury Board Secretariat, Votes 1, 5, 10, 20, 25, 30 and 35

(10) To the Standing Committee on Health

Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Votes 1 and 5

Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Votes 1 and 5

Department of Health, Votes 1, 5 and 10

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board, Vote 1

Public Health Agency of Canada, Votes 1, 5 and 10

(11) To the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Vote 1

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, Vote 1

Department of Employment and Social Development, Votes 1 and 5

(12) To the Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Canadian High Arctic Research Station, Vote 1

Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Votes 1, 5, 10, L15 and L20

Department of Indigenous Services Canada, Votes 1, 5 and 10

(13) To the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Votes 1 and 5

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, Votes 1 and 5

Canadian Space Agency, Votes 1, 5 and 10

Canadian Tourism Commission, Vote 1

Copyright Board, Vote 1

Department of Industry, Votes 1, 5, 10, L15 and L20

Department of Western Economic Diversification, Votes 1 and 5

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, Votes 1 and 5

Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario, Votes 1 and 5

National Research Council of Canada, Votes 1, 5 and 10

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Votes 1 and 5

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Votes 1 and 5

Standards Council of Canada, Vote 1

Statistics Canada, Vote 1

(14) To the Standing Committee on International Trade

Invest in Canada Hub, Vote 1

(15) To the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada, Vote 1

Canadian Human Rights Commission, Vote 1

Courts Administration Service, Vote 1

Department of Justice, Votes 1 and 5

Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs, Votes 1 and 5

Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, Vote 1

Registrar of the Supreme Court of Canada, Vote 1

(16) To the Standing Joint Committee on the Library of Parliament

Library of Parliament, Vote 1

(17) To the Standing Committee on National Defence

Communications Security Establishment, Vote 1

Department of National Defence, Votes 1, 5 and 10

Military Grievances External Review Committee, Vote 1

Military Police Complaints Commission, Vote 1

Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner, Vote 1

(18) To the Standing Committee on Natural Resources

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Vote 1

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Vote 1

Department of Natural Resources, Votes 1, 5 and 10

National Energy Board, Vote 1

Northern Pipeline Agency, Vote 1

(19) To the Standing Committee on Official Languages

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, Vote 1

(20) To the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

House of Commons, Vote 1

Leaders' Debates Commission, Vote 1

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, Vote 1

Parliamentary Protective Service, Vote 1

(21) To the Standing Committee on Public Accounts

Office of the Auditor General, Vote 1

(22) To the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

Canada Border Services Agency, Votes 1 and 5

Canadian Security Intelligence Service, Vote 1

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Vote 1

Correctional Service of Canada, Votes 1 and 5

Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Votes 1 and 5

Office of the Correctional Investigator of Canada, Vote 1

Parole Board of Canada, Vote 1

Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Votes 1, 5 and 10

Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee, Vote 1

Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, Vote 1

Security Intelligence Review Committee, Vote 1

(23) To the Standing Committee on the Status of Women

Department for Women and Gender Equality, Votes 1 and 5

(24) To the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, Vote 1

Canadian Transportation Agency, Vote 1

Department of Transport, Votes 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20

Marine Atlantic Inc., Vote 1

Office of Infrastructure of Canada, Votes 1, 5 and 10

The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc., Vote 1

VIA Rail Canada Inc., Vote 1

Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority, Vote 1

(25) To the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

Department of Veterans Affairs, Votes 1 and 5

Veterans Review and Appeal Board, Vote 1


Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:

— Nos. 421-02889 and 421-02917 concerning the tax system. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-1-41;

— Nos. 421-02897 and 421-03080 concerning Russia. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-222-02;

— Nos. 421-02901, 421-02909, 421-02916, 421-02926, 421-02946, 421-02949, 421-02953, 421-02956, 421-02961, 421-02962, 421-02964, 421-02975, 421-02978, 421-02981, 421-02982, 421-02984, 421-02989, 421-02993, 421-02996, 421-02998, 421-03003, 421-03005, 421-03006, 421-03008, 421-03009, 421-03010, 421-03011, 421-03024, 421-03027, 421-03033, 421-03034, 421-03044, 421-03048, 421-03059, 421-03062, 421-03064, 421-03067, 421-03068, 421-03075 and 421-03088 concerning organ transplants. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-138-12;

— No. 421-02915 concerning the pension system. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-98-15;

— Nos. 421-02918 and 421-03073 concerning cruelty to animals. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-41-19;

— Nos. 421-02920, 421-02935, 421-03001 and 421-03002 concerning China. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-13-30;

— No. 421-02921 concerning euthanasia. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-231-01;

— Nos. 421-02925 and 421-03012 concerning human trafficking. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-232-01;

— Nos. 421-02930, 421-03041 and 421-03091 concerning impaired driving. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-7-30;

— No. 421-02932 concerning food policy. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-113-07;

— Nos. 421-02933, 421-02958 and 421-02991 concerning oil and gas. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-67-09;

— Nos. 421-02937, 421-02987, 421-02988, 421-02999, 421-03021 and 421-03053 concerning a national day. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-131-08;

— Nos. 421-02939, 421-03013, 421-03014, 421-03015, 421-03016, 421-03017, 421-03018, 421-03029, 421-03035, 421-03042, 421-03082, 421-03083, 421-03084, 421-03085, 421-03086, 421-03087 and 421-03102 concerning the use of animals in research. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-42-08;

— Nos. 421-02940, 421-02951, 421-03040, 421-03058, 421-03092, 421-03095, 421-03096, 421-03097, 421-03098 and 421-03100 concerning discrimination. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-32-37;

— No. 421-02948 concerning international development and aid. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-43-15;

— No. 421-02960 concerning Egypt. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-233-01;

— No. 421-02972 concerning the labelling of food products. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-105-04;

— No. 421-02976 concerning housing policy. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-6-17;

— Nos. 421-02985, 421-02992, 421-03057, 421-03074, 421-03079 and 421-03101 concerning the protection of the environment. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-3-68;

— No. 421-03007 concerning Afghanistan. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-49-04;

— No. 421-03025 concerning Tibet. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-100-02;

— Nos. 421-03031, 421-03049, 421-03065, 421-03081 and 421-03094 concerning firearms. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-53-23;

— No. 421-03032 concerning the regulation of food and drugs. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-215-05;

— No. 421-03052 concerning the fishing industry. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-24-22;

— No. 421-03054 concerning Cambodia. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-194-02;

— Nos. 421-03055 and 421-03069 concerning marine transportation. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-92-20;

— No. 421-03056 concerning alcoholic beverages. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-162-02;

— No. 421-03066 concerning blood donations. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-95-02;

— No. 421-03070 concerning the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-115-06;

— Nos. 421-03076 and 421-03077 concerning immigration. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-23-27;

— No. 421-03090 concerning sex selection. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-25-19;

— No. 421-03093 concerning employment. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-224-02;

— No. 421-03099 concerning women's rights. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-130-03.


Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Cuzner (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour) laid upon the Table, — Document entitled "Canada's Report with Respect to the Recommendation Adopted at the 106th Session (June 2017) of the International Labour Conference, Geneva, Switzerland". — Sessional Paper No. 8525-421-92.


Presenting Reports from Committees

Mr. Finnigan (Miramichi—Grand Lake), from the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food, presented the 15th Report of the Committee, "Advancements of Technology and Research in the Agriculture and Agri-Food Sector that can Support Canadian Exports". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-506.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 92, 98, 100, 102, 104 to 106, 109, 116 to 118 and 122 to 124) was tabled.


Introduction of Private Members' Bills

Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington), seconded by Mr. MacKenzie (Oxford), Bill C-424, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (sexual exploitation), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


First Reading of Senate Public Bills

Pursuant to Standing Order 69(2), on motion of Mr. Morneau (Minister of Finance), seconded by Mr. Lametti (Minister of Justice), Bill S-6, An Act to implement the Convention between Canada and the Republic of Madagascar for the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to taxes on income, was read the first time and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


Presenting Petitions

Pursuant to Standing Order 36, petitions certified by the Clerk of Petitions were presented as follows:

— by Ms. Finley (Haldimand—Norfolk), one concerning the tax system (No. 421-03103) and one concerning hypothyroidism (No. 421-03104);

— by Mr. Van Kesteren (Chatham-Kent—Leamington), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-03105);

— by Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay), one concerning women's rights (No. 421-03106);

— by Mr. Kmiec (Calgary Shepard), one concerning the income tax system (No. 421-03107), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-03108) and one concerning loans (No. 421-03109);

— by Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-03110);

— by Mr. Lamoureux (Winnipeg North), one concerning health care services (No. 421-03111);

— by Mrs. Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek), one concerning impaired driving (No. 421-03112);

— by Mr. MacKenzie (Oxford), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-03113);

— by Mrs. Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke), one concerning firearms (No. 421-03114);

— by Mr. Webber (Calgary Confederation), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-03115);

— by Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan), one concerning refugees (No. 421-03116), one concerning Afghanistan (No. 421-03117), one concerning China (No. 421-03118), one concerning firearms (No. 421-03119), one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-03120) and one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-03121);

— by Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-03122);

— by Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-03123);

— by Mr. Fast (Abbotsford), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-03124);

— by Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-03125);

— by Mr. Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-03126).


Questions on the Order Paper

Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the answers to questions Q-2035, Q-2037 to Q-2041, Q-2044, Q-2055, Q-2065, Q-2070 to Q-2072, Q-2075, Q-2076, Q-2083, Q-2085, Q-2101, Q-2102, Q-2105, Q-2106, Q-2117 and Q-2144 on the Order Paper.


Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into Orders for Return:

Q-2030 — Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — With respect to the Trans Mountain pipeline purchased by the government on August 31, 2018: (a) did the Minister of Natural Resources seek a cost-benefit analysis of acquiring the existing pipeline and of building an expansion; (b) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, (i) when was the analysis sought, (ii) when was the finalized analysis received, (iii) in what format was the finalized analysis received, for instance as a briefing note, a memo, a report, etc.; and (c) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, what are the details of the analysis, including (i) name and credentials of the author or authors, (ii) date of publication, (iii) the WTI/WCS differential used in the calculations, (iv) the range in years from which data on Canada’s oil industry was captured and analyzed for the study, (v) the impact of an expanded pipeline on jobs in the Parkland refinery, (vi) the estimated number of construction jobs and of permanent jobs created by the expansion project, (vii) the projected construction costs of the pipeline expansion project, (viii) an assessment of the impacts of a tanker spill or pipeline leak on British Columbia’s tourism and fisheries industries, (ix) the government’s liability in the event of a spill or leak, broken down by recovery costs for marine, alluvial, and land-based ecologies (including but not limited to remediation, rehabilitation and restoration of sites and species, especially endangered species) and financial compensation for loss of livelihood and involuntary resettlement of human populations? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2030.


Q-2031 — Mr. Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend) — With regard to infrastructure projects which were approved for funding by Infrastructure Canada since November 4, 2015: what are the details of all such projects, including (i) location, (ii) project title and description, (iii) amount of federal funding commitment, (iv) amount of federal funding delivered to date, (v) amount of provincial funding commitment, (vi) amount of local funding commitment, including name of municipality or local government, (vii) status of project, (viii) start date, (ix) completion date, or expected completion date? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2031.


Q-2032 — Mr. Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry) — With regard to cyberattacks on government departments and agencies since January 1, 2016, broken down by year: (a) how many attempted cyberattacks on government websites or servers were successfully blocked; (b) how many cyberattacks on government websites or servers were not successfully blocked; and (c) for each cyberattack in (b), what are the details, including (i) date, (ii) departments or agencies targeted, (iii) summary of incident, (iv) whether or not police were informed or charges were laid? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2032.


Q-2033 — Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay) — With regard to communication between the Office of the Prime Minister or the Office of the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities and persons employed by or on the board of directors of Waterfront Toronto: what are all instances of communication from November 5, 2015, to date, broken down by (i) date, (ii) person in the Office of the Prime Minister or of the Minister, (iii) subject matter, (iv) persons with whom communication occurred and their titles, (v) method of communication? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2033.


Q-2034 — Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay) — With regard to the Elementary and Secondary Education Program offered by Indigenous Services Canada, broken down by province and territory: (a) how much funding was budgeted for the program for each fiscal year since 2014-15 to date; and (b) how much has been spent on the program for each fiscal year since 2014-15 to date? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2034.


Q-2036 — Mr. Albrecht (Kitchener—Conestoga) — With regard to the Canada Child Benefit: (a) how many recipients of the benefit (i) are permanent residents of Canada, (ii) are temporary residents of Canada, (iii) have received refugee status, (iv) have made asylum claims that have not yet been adjudicated; (b) what is the total amount of money that has been paid out to the recipients in (a)(iii); and (c) what is the total amount of money that has been paid out to the recipients in (a)(iv)? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2036.


Q-2042 — Ms. Rempel (Calgary Nose Hill) — With respect to border crossings occurring at unofficial Canadian ports of entry between January 1, 2017, and October 30, 2018: (a) how many border crossers have had family members later present themselves at an official point of entry to claim asylum using the exemption in the Safe Third Country Agreement for family members; and (b) how many of the cases described in (a) are currently at the Immigration and Refugee Board? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2042.


Q-2043 — Mr. Dusseault (Sherbrooke) — With regard to applications for cannabis licences approved by Health Canada and the Canada Revenue Agency under the Cannabis Act and the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations: (a) how many licensed producers are structured within family trusts; (b) how many licensed producers have a criminal history; (c) what measures were taken to ensure there was no criminal history; (d) were the criminal histories of the parent companies of licensed producers analyzed; (e) how many licensed producers are associated with individuals with a criminal history; (f) how many parent companies of licensed producers are directly or indirectly associated with individuals and businesses with a criminal history; (g) how many licensed producers were reported by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; (h) are the parent companies of licensed producers required to obtain a security clearance, and if so, how many parent companies of licensed producers are there; (i) what are the sources of financing of licensed producers, broken down by jurisdiction; (j) what is the detailed ownership structure of each licensed producer; and (k) what specific measures did Health Canada and the Canada Revenue Agency take to identify the true beneficiaries of licensed producers? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2043.


Q-2045 — Mr. Choquette (Drummond) — With respect to the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages: (a) to which branch of the government does the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages belong, according to the Official Languages Act; (b) before the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages, had the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages ever covered the expenses of the appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages; (c) if the answer to (b) is negative, why did the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages agree to pay the expenses for the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages; (d) who precisely approached the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages to have it sign and pay for a contract with Boyden for the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages; (e) has Parliament ever authorized the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages to pay for expenses incurred by the government; (f) if the answer to (e) is affirmative, what are the authorizations in question; (g) did Parliament have access to the services from Boyden for which the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages paid in relation to the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages; (h) if the answer to (g) is negative, why; (i) how, in detail, did the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages ensure that the money that it spent for the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages was used for the appropriate purposes; (j) does the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages have all the details of how the money that it paid for the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages was spent; (k) has the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages ever authorized Boyden to subcontract services; and (l) what was the total amount that the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages was prepared to pay to cover expenses related to the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2045.


Q-2046 — Mr. Albrecht (Kitchener—Conestoga) — With regard to the Correctional Service of Canada's Prison Needle Exchange Program: (a) what consultations were done with the Union of Canadian Correctional Officers prior to the pilot program launching; (b) on what dates did the consultations in (a) take place; (c) who was in attendance for the consultations in (a); (d) how many inmates are registered for the program; (e) how many needles have been given to inmates in the program; (f) what are the index offences of inmates registered for the program; (g) what plans, if any, exist to begin the program at other penitentiaries; (h) is an inmate's participation in the program noted in their correctional plan; (i) is an inmate's participation in the program disclosed to the Parole Board of Canada; (j) what safety measures, if any, have been put in place to protect correctional officers from needles that are now in circulation; (k) how many cases have been found of inmates not in the program being in possession of needles sourced to the program; (l) how many needles have been returned to administrators of the program; (m) how many needles have gone missing as a result of inmates losing or not returning them; (n) where does the government suspect that the remaining or missing needles are located; (o) how many inmates have been subject to disciplinary measures for either failing to return a prison exchange needle or being in violation of the program's regulations; and (p) what is the rate of inmate assaults on correctional officers since the program began? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2046.


Q-2047 — Mr. Albrecht (Kitchener—Conestoga) — With regard to infrastructure projects approved for funding by Infrastructure Canada since November 4, 2015, in the Waterloo region (defined as the ridings of Kitchener—Conestoga, Kitchener South—Hespeler, Kitchener Center, Waterloo, and Cambridge): what are the details of all such projects, including (i) location, (ii) project title and description, (iii) amount of federal funding commitment, (iv) amount of federal funding delivered to date, (v) amount of provincial funding commitment, (vi) amount of local funding commitment, including name of municipality or local government, (vii) status of project, (viii) start date, (ix) completion date or expected completion date? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2047.


Q-2048 — Mrs. Wong (Richmond Centre) — With regard to funding allocated in the Main Estimates 2018-19 under the Department of Employment and Social Development: (a) what are the details of funding for programs targeted at seniors, including (i) amount of funding allocated per program, (ii) name of program, (iii) summary of program; and (b) what are the details of all organizations which received funding to date through the allocations referenced in (a), including (i) name of organization, (ii) start and end date of funding, (iii) amount, (iv) description of programs or services for which funding is intended, (v) location (i.e. riding name)? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2048.


Q-2049 — Ms. Ramsey (Essex) — With regard to federal spending in the riding of Essex, for each fiscal year since 2015-16, inclusively: what are the details of all grants, contributions and loans to every organization, group, business or municipality, broken down by (i) name of the recipient, (ii) municipality of the recipient, (iii) date on which the funding was received, (iv) amount received, (v) department or agency that provided the funding, (vi) program under which the grant, contribution or loan was made, (vii) nature or purpose of the funding? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2049.


Q-2050 — Ms. Ramsey (Essex) — With respect to the federal agency Invest in Canada and its board of directors: (a) what is, to date, the total amount of expenses of the Chair of the board and the members of the board, broken down by type of expenditure; (b) what are the details of implementing a national strategy to attract foreign direct investment to Canada; (c) how many new partnerships have been created, to date, with the departments or agencies of any government in Canada, the private sector in Canada, or other Canadian stakeholders interested in foreign direct investment; (d) how many activities, events, conferences and programs to promote Canada as a destination for investors have so far been created; (e) how much information has so far been collected, prepared and disseminated to assist foreign investors in supporting their foreign direct investment decisions in Canada; (f) how many services have been provided to foreign investors, to date, in respect of their current or potential investments in Canada; (g) who are the foreign investors that the agency has met, to date; (h) what are the suppliers outside of the federal public administration which the agency has used to date; (i) what, to date, are the providers of legal services outside the federal public administration on which the agency has relied; and (j) what are the filters and anti-conflict-of-interest requirements to which the members of the board are subject? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2050.


Q-2051 — Ms. Ramsey (Essex) — With respect to the appointment process of the Chair and the members of the board of directors of the federal agency Invest in Canada: (a) did the President and any other member of the board disclose to the Deputy Minister any advice that, if adopted and executed by Invest in Canada, would provide them with a personal or professional financial gain, or bring one to a member of their immediate families or to any organization to which they are affiliated; (b) are the Chair or any other member of the board authorized to disclose to the members of other boards of directors (i) documentation, (ii) deliberations, (iii) records, (iv) advice obtained, (v) updates, (vi) commission data; (c) did the President or any other member of the board report an apparent conflict of interest; (d) did the Chair and any other member of the board object to a discussion or formulation of a recommendation that would conflict with their other interests; and (e) to what regulations, laws or policies relating to conflicts of interest and ethics are the President and any other member of the board subject? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2051.


Q-2052 — Ms. Trudel (Jonquière) — With regard to problematic issues related to the Phoenix pay system and the implementation of mixed pay teams in the 13 departments in June 2018: (a) what is the evolution of the cumulative backlog, broken down by department; (b) how many people were underpaid by the Phoenix pay system, in total and broken down by department; (c) how many employees experienced a total pay disruption, broken down by department; (d) of those employees in (c), broken down by department and sex, (i) how many did not receive any pay, (ii) how many had other errors related to pay; (e) what is the average error processing time, broken down by individual complaint; and (f) how many hours of overtime were required to address these issues, broken down by hours of work and costs incurred per pay period? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2052.


Q-2053 — Mr. Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge) — With respect to applications for the disability tax credit (DTC) by persons with type one diabetes which were rejected after the changes in wording to the letter to physicians in 2017 and were reviewed after the same changes in wording were reversed: (a) how many applications were reviewed; (b) how many of the applications in (a) were approved upon review; (c) how many of the applications in (a) were rejected again upon review; (d) how many of the applicants in (b) were notified of the approval; (e) how many of the applicants in (c) were notified of the rejection; (f) how many of the applicants in (c) were not notified of the rejection; (g) how many of the applicants in (c) appealed the rejection; (h) how many of the applicants in (f) were eligible to appeal the rejection; (i) how many of the applicants in (h) passed the due date for appeals without knowing about the rejection of their applications; and (j) had all applicants in (b) successfully appealed the rejection of their applications, how much would the aggregate disability tax credit claims cost on an annual basis? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2053.


Q-2054 — Mr. Eglinski (Yellowhead) — With regard to Canadian National Railway’s (CN) potential discontinuance of a portion of the Foothills Subdivision and Mountain Spur in Alberta: (a) what analysis has the government undertaken of the potential impacts of this discontinuance; (b) what plans does the government have in place to address and mitigate the impacts; (c) what is the government’s position with regard to accepting the line at a cost not higher than the net salvage value of the rail line; (d) what is the government’s estimate of the current net salvage value of this rail line; (e) is the government aware of any other plans by CN to discontinue any other portions of the rail line, and if so, what are these plans; and (f) does the government plan to include funding for the Foothills Subdivision and Mountain Spur and other similar cases in Budget 2019? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2054.


Q-2056 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to federal contracts with SNC-Lavalin: (a) are there any contingency plans in place for the 148 existing contracts in the event that SNC-Lavalin becomes ineligible to receive government contracts; (b) has the government sent tenders, letters of intent, or requests for quotation to SNC-Lavalin since April 27, 2013; (c) if the answer to (b) is affirmative, on what occasions was this done and what were the projects in question; (d) for all contracts awarded to SNC-Lavalin since 2013, what were the successful bid amounts; (e) for all completed contracts awarded to SNC-Lavalin since 2013, what amount of money was actually disbursed for each contract; (f) for any contracts that were amended after being awarded since 2013, (i) what contracts were amended, (ii) for what reason were they amended; (g) in general, what is the process for approving amendments to contracts; (h) which buildings owned by the federal government does SNC-Lavalin currently maintain or manage; and (i) what incidents, broken down by category (e.g. critical, health and safety, security) and date, have occurred in government facilities maintained or operated by SNC-Lavalin, or in SNC-Lavalin facilities occupied by government departments? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2056.


Q-2057 — Mrs. Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke) — With regards to the Statutes of Canada, 2018, Chapter 16 (Cannabis Act), where Part 6, Section 93(2) of the Regulations state that "...cannabis may contain residues of a pest control product, its components or derivatives, if they do not exceed any maximum residue limit, in relation to cannabis, specified for the pest control product, its components or derivatives under section 9 or 10 of the Pest Control Products Act...": (a) has Health Canada defined a maximum residue limit for residual chemicals in recreational cannabis as a commodity; (b) if the answer to (a) is positive (i) what is the maximum residue limit, (ii) have the public databases on maximum residue limits been updated to reflect the maximum residue limit for recreational cannabis; (c) if the answer to (a) is negative, does Health Canada intend to define a maximum residue limit for residual chemicals in recreational cannabis; (d) if the answer to (c) is positive, when does Health Canada intend to publish the maximum residue limit for residual chemicals in recreational cannabis; and (e) if the answer to (c) is negative, will Part 6, Section 93(2) of the Regulations apply to recreational cannabis as a commodity? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2057.


Q-2058 — Mrs. Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke) — With regards to applications for visitor visas since January 1, 2016, broken down by calendar year: (a) what number of people from Pakistan have applied for a visitor visa; (b) for each applicant in (a), what number were identified as Christian on their passports; (c) for each applicant in (b), what number were granted visitor visas; (d) for each applicant in (c), what number of adult applicants had annual incomes of 252,000 Pakistani rupees (PKR), or 3,000 Canadian dollars, or less; (e) for each applicant in (d), what number of people claimed asylum in Canada; (f) for each applicant in (e), what number were granted asylum; and (g) for each response provided in (a) through (f), what is the breakdown by gender? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2058.


Q-2059 — Mr. Généreux (Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup) — With regard to expenditures related to the 2018 G7 Summit in Charlevoix: (a) what is the total cost of all expenditures to date; and (b) what are the details of each expenditure, including (i) vendor, (ii) description of goods or services, (iii) quantity, (iv) amount, (v) file number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2059.


Q-2060 — Mr. Dreeshen (Red Deer—Mountain View) — With regard to the “capability gap” in relation to military aircraft and fighter jets: what are the details of all briefing documents related to the matter since November 4, 2015, including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipient, (iv) title, (v) summary, (vi) file number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2060.


Q-2061 — Mr. Nuttall (Barrie—Springwater—Oro-Medonte) — With regard to Statistics Canada’s plan to harvest data from Canadians’ bank accounts: for each of the next five years, what is the projected revenue that the agency will receive as a result of selling information or statistics obtained as a result of the project? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2061.


Q-2062 — Mr. Duvall (Hamilton Mountain) — With regard to public consultations planned in Budget 2018 concerning retirement income security following the "Sears" case, between February 2018 and November 2, 2018, broken down by month: (a) did the Minister of Seniors conduct public consultations; (b) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, which individuals and organizations did the Minister of Seniors consult; (c) what are the recommendations or conclusions of the persons and organizations consulted, broken down by person and organization consulted; (d) in which municipalities did these meetings take place; (e) in which electoral districts did these meetings take place; and (f) were the Members of Parliament representing the constituencies referred to in (e) invited to these meetings? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2062.


Q-2063 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — With regard to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada's May 14, 2018, decision to suspend the processing of permanent resident visas for adoptive children from Japan: (a) who made the decision; (b) what was the rationale for the decision; (c) what evidence was provided to support the decision; (d) have officials from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada communicated with the State Department of the United States with respect to the decision; (e) have officials from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada communicated with the British Columbia Director of Adoption with respect to the decision; (f) why did Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada approve visas for the Japan-born adoptive children of five families from British Columbia in June 2018 despite the suspension on adoptions from Japan; (g) what are the specific questions on which Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada is seeking clarification from the government of Japan; (h) what were the responses, if any, that the government received from Japan; (i) what concerns, if any, does the government have with the Japan adoption program; and (j) has there been a change in policy with regard to adoption from non-Hague countries? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2063.


Q-2064 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — With regard to the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS), broken down by fiscal year 2016-17 and 2017-18: (a) what was the budget for the FTCS; (b) how much of that budget was spent within the fiscal year; (c) how much was spent on each component of the FTCS, specifically, (i) mass media, (ii) policy and regulatory development, (iii) research, (iv) surveillance, (v) enforcement, (vi) grants and contributions, (vii) programs for Indigenous Canadians; (d) were any other activities not listed in (c) funded by the FTCS and, if so, how much was spent on each of these activities; and (e) was part of the budget reallocated for purposes other than tobacco control and, if so, how much was reallocated? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2064.


Q-2066 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to the federal agency Invest in Canada: (a) what is the remuneration range for its Board of Directors; (b) what are the details of all travel expenses incurred by Invest in Canada since its inception, including for each expenditure the (i) traveller, (ii) purpose, (iii) dates, (iv) air fare, (v) other transportation, (vi) accommodation, (vii) meals and incidentals, (viii) other, (ix) total; (c) what are the details of all hospitality expenses incurred by Invest in Canada, including for each expenditure the (i) individual, (ii) location and vendor, (iii) total, (iv) description, (v) date, (vi) number of attendees, including government employees and guests; (d) will the agency’s travel and hospitality expenditures be subject to proactive disclosure and, if not, why; and (e) since Invest in Canada’s inception, what are the details of the contracts awarded, including (i) date of contract, (ii) value of contract, (iii) vendor name, (iv) file number, (v) description of services provided? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2066.


Q-2067 — Mr. McCauley (Edmonton West) — With regard to Environment and Climate Change Canada’s YouTube channel since November 4, 2015: (a) how many full-time equivalents manage the channel; (b) what are the titles and corresponding pay scales of the full-time equivalents who manage the channel; (c) how much has been spent on overtime pay for the full-time equivalents who manage the channel; (d) how much has been spent on developing content for the channel, and how much is earmarked to be spent for the remainder of the 2018-19 fiscal year; (e) how much has been spent on promoting content for the channel, and how much is earmarked to be spent for the remainder of the 2018-19 fiscal year; (f) is there a cross-platform promotion plan to share content from the channel to other digital media platforms; (g) are the costs associated with the plan described in (f) included in the YouTube budget, or do they fall within the budget of the other platforms; (h) what are the digital media platforms used to promote or share the Minister’s YouTube content; (i) what is the monthly expenditure on the channel, broken down by month; (j) what is the cost associated with each video on the channel; and (k) what is the annual expenditure on the channel, broken down by year? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2067.


Q-2068 — Mr. McCauley (Edmonton West) — With regard to Government of Canada electric vehicles: (a) how many electric vehicles does the government have in the greater Ottawa area; (b) of the vehicles in (a) what are the makes, models, and years for each of those vehicles; (c) when were these vehicles purchased, broken down by amount purchased per month; (d) how many charging stations does the government have in the Ottawa area; (e) of the charging stations in (d), when were they installed; (f) to date, what is the cost of the installation of charging stations; and (g) what is the kw/h used at the charging stations by month since they have been installed? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2068.


Q-2069 — Mr. McCauley (Edmonton West) — With regard to the government's Mandate Letter Tracker tool: (a) what is the methodology in determining the current status of a commitment; (b) what metrics are used to differentiate between a commitment which has “made progress” and those that have “made progress toward ongoing goal”; (c) what metrics are used to determine if a commitment is “facing challenges”; (d) which department is responsible for the mandate letter tracker; (e) how many full-time equivalents monitor and maintain the mandate letter tracker; and (f) of the FTE’s in (e) what are their employment classifications? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2069.


Q-2073 — Mr. Kmiec (Calgary Shepard) — With regard to the business activities of the Royal Canadian Mint (the Mint) for the fiscal years 2015, 2016, and 2017: (a) what was the total revenue received from the Mint's numismatic business activities for each year; (b) what was the total revenue received from the Mint's bullion products and services function for each year; (c) what were the total profits earned from the Mint's numismatic business activities for each year; (d) what were the total profits earned from the Mint's bullion products and services function for each year; (e) what countries did the Mint provide numismatic products to in each year, broken down by the percentage of business activity in each country; (f) what countries did the Mint provide bullion products to in each year, broken down by percentage of business activity in each country; (g) what was the total value of bullion products sold by the Mint to Canadian customers for each year; (h) what are the names of the Canadian distributors and customers that the Mint sold bullion products to in each year, broken down by the value of bullion products sold to them; (i) what was the total value of numismatic products sold to Canadian distributors and customers for each year; (j) what are the names of the Canadian distributors and customers that the Mint sold numismatic products to in each year, broken down by the value of numismatic products sold to them; (k) what was the total value of bullion products sold by the Mint to American distributors and customers for each year; (l) what are the names of the American distributors and customers that the Mint sold bullion products to in each year, broken down by the value of bullions product sold to them; (m) what was the total value of numismatic products sold to American distributors and customers for each year; (n) what are the names of the American distributors and customers that the Mint sold numismatic products to in each year, broken down by the value of numismatic products sold to them; and (o) what is the alphabetical list of all approved bullion and numismatic distributors and customers that the Mint sells to for each year? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2073.


Q-2074 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — With regard to the Canada Infrastructure Bank, since its creation: (a) what is the number of meetings held with Canadian and foreign investors, broken down by (i) month, (ii) country, (iii) investor class; (b) what is the complete list of investors met with; and (c) what are the details of the contracts awarded by the Canada Infrastructure Bank, including (i) date of contract, (ii) value of contract, (iii) vendor name, (iv) file number, (v) description of services provided? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2074.


Q-2077 — Mr. Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou) — With regard to all Government of Canada communications (meetings, emails, letters, telephone calls, teleconferences, etc.) regarding (i) the emission of red dust in Limoilou and Québec, (ii) all other possible emissions from the Port of Québec’s industrial and port activities, including various dusts and noxious odours in Limoilou and Québec, (iii) public health, (iv) all forms of emissions under the responsibility of the Ministère des Transports du Québec, in particular from nearby highways, (v) all forms of emissions from the Québec incinerator, (vi) all other forms of dust and emissions that may come from other areas, broken down by subject: what are the details of each communication, including (i) the date, (ii) the sender, (iii) the recipient, (iv) the title and subject, (v) the type of communication, (vi) the file number, (vii) the content surrounding each subject since November 4, 2015, between the government and (a) Port of Québec authorities; (b) the office of the Mayor of Québec; (c) the Government of Quebec; (d) the MNA for Jean-Lesage; (e) the MNA for Taschereau; (f) Quebec Stevedoring Company Ltd. (QSL), formerly Arrimage du Saint-Laurent; (g) companies operating on Port of Québec lands? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2077.


Q-2078 — Mrs. Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke) — With regard to government spending and charges laid pertaining to matters of national security: (a) how much has been spent annually since 2015 by each department investigating and prosecuting Vice Admiral Mark Norman, specifically (i) the RCMP, (ii) the Public Prosecution Services, (iii) the Privy Council Office (PCO), (iv) the Department of National Defence (DND), (v) the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), (vi) any other department or agency; (b) how much has been spent by each department investigating the 1,366 incidences of actionable financial intelligence on money laundering identified by the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) in 2017, specifically (i) the RCMP, (ii) the Public Prosecution Service, (iii) PCO, (iv) any other department; (c) how much has been spent by each department investigating and prosecuting the 462 terrorism financing and threats to the security of Canada identified by FINTRAC in 2016 and 2017, specifically (i) the RCMP, (ii) the Public Prosecution Services, (iii) PCO, (iv) DND, (v) the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), (vi) any other department or agency; (d) how much has been spent by each department investigating and prosecuting the 187 actionable financial transactions related to money laundering, terrorism, terrorism financing and threats to the security of Canada identified by FINTRAC in 2016 and 2017, specifically (i) the RCMP, (ii) the Public Prosecution Services, (iii) PCO, (iv) DND, (v) CSIS, (vi) any other department or agency; (e) how many charges related to specific incidences of terrorism financing reported by FINTRAC were laid in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018; and (f) how many of the cases in (e) have resulted in successful prosecutions? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2078.


Q-2079 — Mr. Dusseault (Sherbrooke) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and the Liechtenstein leaks, the Panama Papers and the Bahamas Leaks: (a) how many Canadian taxpayers were identified in the documents obtained, broken down by information leak and type of taxpayer, that is (i) an individual, (ii) a corporation, (iii) a partnership or trust; (b) how many audits did the CRA launch following the identification of taxpayers in (a), broken down by information leak; (c) of the audits in (b), how many were referred to the CRA’s Criminal Investigations Program, broken down by information leak; (d) how many of the investigations in (c) were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, broken down by information leak; (e) how many of the investigations in (d) resulted in a conviction, broken down by information leak; and (f) what was the sentence imposed for each conviction in (e), broken down by information leak? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2079.


Q-2080 — Mr. Dusseault (Sherbrooke) — With regard to real estate and office space leased by the government from private sector businesses since November 4, 2015, broken down by department or agency: what are the details of all the contracts, including (i) vendor; (ii) amount; (iii) start and end date of the contract? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2080.


Q-2081 — Mrs. Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek) — With regard to Transport Canada’s Community Participation Funding Program: (a) what are the details of all recipients of funding under the program since November 4, 2015, including the (i) recipient, (ii) amount, (iii) start date of the related activity or event, (iv) description and title of the activity or event, (v) purpose of funding; and (b) what are the details of all applicants who were denied funding under the program, including the (i) name, (ii) date of application, (iii) summary or description of the event related to the proposal, (iv) reason why the funding request was denied? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2081.


Q-2082 — Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington) — With regard to the $6 million budget for the Leader’s Debates Commission: what is the breakdown of how the $6 million is projected to be spent by standard object and line item? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2082.


Q-2084 — Mr. Aboultaif (Edmonton Manning) — With regard to government contracts with Cossette Communication Inc., especially the decision to pay $499,800 to come up with a brand, logo, name and website for FinDev Canada: (a) on what date was the FinDev Canada contract signed; (b) on what date was the Minister of International Development or the Minister’s office informed that the contract in (a) existed; (c) who authorized the amount of the contract in (a) to be increased from the original value to $499,800; (d) what was the rationale or justification for increasing the original value of the contract in (a); (e) what are the details of all other contracts any department, agency, Crown corporation or other government entity has entered into with Cossette Communication Inc. since November 4, 2015, including the (i) date and duration (ii) amount, (iii) final contract value, (iv) original contract value, if different than the final, (v) justification for increasing the original contract value, if applicable, (vi) detailed description of goods or services provided, (vii) name of advertising or other campaign relevant to the contract; and (f) what is the total value of contracts entered into with Cossette Communication Inc. since November 4, 2015? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2084.


Q-2086 — Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River) — With regard to Tax-Free Savings Accounts (TFSA) in Canada for the three most recent tax years available: (a) what is the total number of TFSAs, broken down by age groups (i) 15 to 24, (ii) 25 to 34, (iii) 35 to 54, (iv) 55 to 64, (v) 65 and above; (b) what is the total value of TFSAs, broken down by amounts (i) under $100,000, (ii) $100,000 to $250,000, (iii) $250,000 to $500,000, (iv) $500,000 to $1,000,000, (v) over $1,000,000; (c) how many individuals have a TFSA; and (d) how many individuals have multiple TFSAs? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2086.


Q-2087 — Mr. Warkentin (Grande Prairie—Mackenzie) — With regard to the leaking of information from Cabinet meetings or Cabinet committee meetings, since November 4, 2015: (a) of how many instances of leaked information is the government aware; (b) how many individuals have been, or are, under investigation for leaking such information; (c) have any ministers been investigated for leaking such information and, if so, which ones; and (d) have any former ministers been investigated for leaking such information and, if so, which ones? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2087.


Q-2088 — Ms. Raitt (Milton) — With regard to communication sent or received by Statistics Canada since January 1, 2017: (a) what are the details of all communication between Statistics Canada and the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, the Office of the Minister or the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipient, (iv) title, (v) subject matter, (vi) summary of contents, (vii) format (email, letter, teleconference, etc.); (b) what are the details of all communication between Statistics Canada and banks or other financial institutions, including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipient, (iv) title, (v) subject matter, (vi) summary of contents, (vii) format (email, letter, teleconference, etc.); and (c) what are the details of all communication between Statistics Canada and the Office of the Prime Minister or the Privy Council Office, including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipient, (iv) title, (v) subject matter, (vi) summary of contents, (vii) format (email, letter, teleconference, etc.)? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2088.


Q-2089 — Mr. Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry) — With regard to the government’s “price on pollution” or carbon tax: what was the “price on pollution” or carbon tax revenue that the federal government received as a result of the 2018 dump of 162 million litres of raw sewage into the St. Lawrence River in or around Longueuil, Quebec? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2089.


Q-2090 — Mr. Obhrai (Calgary Forest Lawn) — With regard to expenditures related to the Fall Economic Statement in November 2018: (a) what is the total of all expenditures related to the statement; and (b) what are the details of each expenditure, including (i) vendor, (ii) date, (iii) amount, (iv) detailed description of goods or services, (v) location of vendor, (vi) file number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2090.


Q-2091 — Mr. Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan) — With regard to the government’s policies and protocols in relation to spider sightings and sending government employees home: (a) how many employees from Shared Services Canada were sent home as a result of the alleged spider sightings at the building located at 2300 St. Laurent Blvd, Ottawa, in 2018; (b) on what dates were employees sent home; (c) what is the breakdown of how many employees were sent home on each date in (b); (d) were any dangerous spiders discovered as a result of the sightings and, if so, which ones; (e) how much did the government spend on fumigation, investigations or other activities resulting from the sightings and what is the detailed breakdown of such expenditures; and (f) what are the government’s policies and protocols for when spiders are allegedly sighted on government property and when to send employees home? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2091.


Q-2092 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — With regards to the three proposed tax provisions in the 2018 Fall Economic Statement to accelerate business investment and their impact on provincial revenue: (a) has the Department of Finance calculated the forgone revenue estimates for provinces and, if not, why; (b) what are the calculated forgone revenue estimates, broken down for each fiscal year until 2023-24, (i) for each province, (ii) by provision; (c) how many times has this topic been discussed with the government and has the question been raised with the Minister or Deputy Minister and, if so, has the Minister provided a response and, if so, what was it; (d) has there been any briefing with detailed information on the matter and for every briefing document or docket prepared, what is (i) the date, (ii) the title and subject matter, (iii) the department's internal tracking number; (e) were provincial officials notified of the government's intent to change these provisions and their fiscal implication and, if not, why; (f) which provincial officials were contacted; (g) which provinces shared concerns about revenues loss stemming from these provisions; and (h) what was the nature of these concerns? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2092.


Q-2093 — Mr. Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis) — With regard to the August 2018 letter sent by the Minister of Health to the then Quebec Health Minister warning that the government would cut health care transfer payments to the province if it continued to allow patients to pay out of pocket for medical exams: (a) which other provinces or territories have received similar warning letters from the Minister since November 4, 2015; and (b) what are the details of each letter, including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipient, (iv) nature and summary of the warning? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2093.


Q-2094 — Mr. Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola) — With regard Statistics Canada’s plan to harvest financial transaction data and the claim by the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development that he found out about the plan through the media: (a) on what date did Statistics Canada begin developing the plan; (b) on what date did Statistics Canada notify banks or financial institutions about the plan; (c) on what date did Statistics Canada notify the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development about the plan; and (d) on what date did Statistics Canada notify the Privacy Commissioner about the plan? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2094.


Q-2095 — Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — With regard to expenditures on cellular services by the Privy Council Office (PCO) and the Office of the Prime Minister (PMO): (a) what is the total of all such expenditures since December 1, 2015, broken down by month; (b) what is the total number of devices in use, broken down by month and type of device; (c) what is the average expenditure for cellular services per device, per month; (d) what is the breakdown of (a) and (b) by (i) PCO, excluding exempt staff, (ii) exempt staff in the PMO, (iii) exempt staff in other ministers offices under the PCO (Government House Leader, Minister of Democratic Institutions and Minister of lntergovernmental Affairs); and (e) what is the breakdown of (a) and (b) by vendor or service provider? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2095.


Q-2096 — Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — With regard to the Prime Minister’s trip to France in November 2018: (a) who took part in the trip, broken down by (i) exempt staff of the Office of the Prime Minister, (ii) Members of Parliament, (iii) Senators, (iv) employees of the Privy Council Office, (v) other guests; (b) for each of the participants identified in (a), what were the costs of the trip, broken down by (i) total cost, (ii) accommodation, (iii) travel, (iv) meals, (v) all other expenses; (c) what were the details for all of the hospitality activities and events during the trip, including (i) the dates, (ii) the cities, (iii) the number of attendees, (iv) the total costs; and (d) what agreements or arrangements were signed? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2096.


Q-2097 — Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — With regard to the Minister of Finance’s trip to China in November 2018: (a) who went on the trip, broken down by (i) Minister’s staff, (ii) Members of Parliament, (iii) Senators, (iv) departmental employees, (v) other guests; (b) for each person identified in (a), what were the travel costs, broken down by (i) total cost, (ii) accommodation, (iii) travel, (iv) meals, (v) all other expenses; (c) what are the details of all events and representation activities during the trip, including (i) dates, (ii) cities, (iii) number of participants, (iv) total costs; and (d) what agreements were signed? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2097.


Q-2098 — Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — With regard to the speech made by the Minister of Finance to the Canada China Business Council in November 2018: (a) did the Minister know that journalists had been denied access before making his speech; (b) if the answer in (a) is affirmative, why did the Minister agree to make his speech if journalists were excluded; (c) what are the government’s guidelines regarding journalists’ access to events involving ministers; (d) did the Minister follow the guidelines in (c); and (e) what is the government’s position on the prohibition on journalists during the Minister’s speech? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2098.


Q-2099 — Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — With regard to land owned by the Department of National Defence on the slopes of Mont-Saint-Bruno: (a) what are the department’s plans for this 441-hectare wooded area adjacent to the national park; (b) will it respond favourably to the request by the executive committee of the Communauté métropolitiane de Montréal, Mouvement Ceinture Verte, Fondation du Mont-Saint-Bruno and the Municipality of Saint-Bruno-de-Mantarville to incorporate the area in its entirety into Mont-Saint-Bruno provincial park; and (c) when will the Department of National Defence make a decision on the sale, transfer or retention of the area? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2099.


Q-2100 — Mr. Calkins (Red Deer—Lacombe) — With regard to the consultations and roundtables with stakeholders launched in October 2018 by the Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction in relation to firearms: (a) what are the details of each consultation or roundtable discussion, including (i) date, (ii) location, (iii) stakeholders in attendance, (iv) Ministers or Members of Parliament in attendance; (b) who decided which stakeholders would be invited to the discussions, and what criteria was used; and (c) what is the complete list of stakeholders who were (i) invited, (ii) attended the consultations or roundtables? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2100.


Q-2103 — Mr. Poilievre (Carleton) — With regards to Budget 2016 Growing the Middle Class and the median wage income: (a) what are the details of all documents, including spreadsheets, used to create Chart 1 Real median wage income of Canadians, 1975-2015, in the Budget, broken down by (i) median wage income of women, (ii) median wage income of men, (iii) median wage income; (b) is the data regarding the median wage income of Canadians available for the most recent years after 2015 and, if so, which years; and (c) if the answer to (b) is affirmative, what are the details of all documents, including spreadsheets, regarding the median wage income of Canadians for each of the most recent years available after 2015, broken down annually by (i) median wage income of women, (ii) median wage income of men, (iii) median wage income? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2103.


Q-2104 — Mr. Tilson (Dufferin—Caledon) — With regard to the process for renewing expiring permanent residency cards: (a) what is the average processing time for a card renewal; (b) what is the average time between when an application for renewal is received by the government and when the replacement card is ready; (c) what is the specific process the government undertakes for card renewals; (d) what specific options are available to residents who wish to travel abroad and have submitted their expiring card to the government as part of the renewal application, but who are still waiting for the government to provide them with a replacement card; and (e) what specific changes will the government make in order to make it easier for permanent residents to travel aboard during the renewal period? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2104.


Q-2107 — Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound) — With regard to the Prime Minister’s tweet on December 2, 2018, pledging $50 million to Education Cannot Wait: was this funding approved by the Treasury Board before or after the Prime Minister posted the tweet? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2107.


Q-2108 — Mr. Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola) — With regard to government policies and procedures: what are the government's policies and procedures when a sitting Cabinet minister is being investigated by the RCMP? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2108.


Q-2109 — Mr. Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner) — With regard to the Safe Third Country Agreement: how many individuals have been exempted from the Safe Third Country Agreement due to the presence of a relative in Canada who crossed the border “irregularly” since January 1, 2016? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2109.


Q-2110 — Mr. Maguire (Brandon—Souris) — With regard to the government's prompt payment consultation process, since consultations started: (a) how many meetings have taken place and where did they take place; (b) how many individuals or companies have participated; (c) how many responses have been received; (d) what are the total costs to undertake the consultations; (e) when are the consultations ending; and (f) when will the consultations and information collected be provided to the Minister's office? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2110.


Q-2111 — Mr. Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend) — With regard to the government’s Connect to Innovate Program first announced in the 2016 Budget: (a) what is the total of all expenditures to date under the program; and (b) what are the details of all projects funded to date under the program, including (i) recipient of funding, (ii) name of the project, (iii) location, (iv) project start date, (v) amount of funding pledged, (vi) amount of funding actually provided to date, (vii) description of the project? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2111.


Q-2112 — Ms. Harder (Lethbridge) — With regard to the Prime Minister’s recent comment that “There are impacts when you bring construction workers into a rural area”: to what specific impacts was the Prime Minister referring? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2112.


Q-2113 — Mr. MacKenzie (Oxford) — With regard to expenditures on furniture rentals by the government since January 1, 2016, broken down by department or agency: (a) what is the total of all expenditures; and (b) what are the details of each expenditure, including the (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) date of the contract, (iv) delivery date of the furniture, (v) duration of the rental, (vi) itemized description, including the quantity of rentals, (vii) file number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2113.


Q-2114 — Mr. Shipley (Lambton—Kent—Middlesex) — With regard to projects funded since May 1, 2018, under the Atlantic Fisheries Fund: what are the details of all such projects, including (i) project name, (ii) description, (iii) location, (iv) recipient, (v) amount of federal contribution, (vi) date of announcement? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2114.


Q-2116 — Mr. Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland) — With regard to flights taken on chartered or government aircraft by the Minister of Environment and Climate Change since November 4, 2015: (a) what are the details of all flights, including (i) date, (ii) origin, (iii) destination, (iv) number of passengers; and (b) what are the details of any contract related to the flights in (a), including (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) date and duration of contract, (iv) description of goods or services? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2116.


Q-2118 — Mr. Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman) — With regard to Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake and the revelation at the Standing Committee on Public Accounts on December 3, 2018, that certain programs at the base were either being moved to Ottawa or are under consideration to be moved to Ottawa: (a) what is the complete list of programs which are either being moved or are under consideration for being moved out of Cold Lake, and to where are each of those programs possibly being moved; and (b) what are the government’s projections regarding the number of individuals subject to transfer away from Cold Lake as a result of each move in (a), broken down by program? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2118.


Q-2119 — Ms. Trudel (Jonquière) — With regard to the Minister of International Trade’s trip to China in November 2018: (a) who went on the trip, broken down by (i) Minister’s staff, (ii) Members of Parliament, (iii) Senators, (iv) departmental employees, (v) other guests; (b) for each person identified in (a), what were the travel costs, broken down by (i) total cost, (ii) accommodation, (iii) travel, (iv) meals, (v) all other expenses; (c) what are the details of all events and representation activities during the trip, including (i) dates, (ii) cities, (iii) number of participants, (iv) total costs; and (d) what agreements were signed? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2119.


Q-2120 — Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — With regard to ministerial permits: (a) how many Temporary Resident Visas issued under ministerial permit have been granted, broken down by month between November 2015 and December 2018; and (b) how many Temporary Resident Permits issued under ministerial permit have been granted, broken down by month between November 2015 and December 2018? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2120.


Q-2121 — Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — With regard to requests from Members of Parliament for Temporary Resident Visas: (a) what is the number of requests received from Members since January 1, 2016, broken down by year; (b) what is the number of requests received, broken down by individual Member; and (c) what is the number of requests granted, broken down by individual Member? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2121.


Q-2122 — Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — With regard to requests from Members of Parliament for Temporary Resident Permits: (a) what is the number of requests received from Members since January 1, 2016, broken down by year; (b) what is the number of requests received, broken down by individual Member; and (c) what is the number of requests granted, broken down by individual Member? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2122.


Q-2123 — Mr. Warawa (Langley—Aldergrove) — With regard to the Canadian delegation to the 24th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP24) in Katowice, Poland: (a) what is the total number of members of the delegation, including any accompanying staff, broken down by organization; (b) what is the title of each member of the delegation, broken down by organization; (c) what is the total allocated budget for the delegation; and (d) what is projected or estimated travel and hospitality expenses for the delegation, broken down by type of expense? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2123.


Q-2124 — Mr. Eglinski (Yellowhead) — With regard to the lack of enforcement actions by the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA): (a) what is the budget of the CTA for the calendar years (i) 2013, (ii) 2014, (iii) 2015, (iv) 2016, (v) 2017, (vi) 2018; (b) what is the number of complaints received by the CTA between 2013 and 2018, broken down by year; (c) what is the number of cases where the CTA representatives turned away any complaints by passengers between 2013 and 2018, broken down by year; (d) what is the number of enforcement actions taken between 2013 and 2018, broken down by year; (e) why has the number of complaints received by the CTA quadrupled between 2013 and 2017, while enforcement actions have seen a near four-fold decrease during the same period; (f) for what reason has the CTA taken no enforcement action against Air Canada for defying Decision No. 12-C-A-2018; (g) why did the Minister of Transport not investigate the allegations of fabrication and fraud levelled against CTA staff who turned away valid complaints by passengers; and (h) what steps has the Minister of Transport taken against the airlines and crew involved in defrauding consumers and authorities in what was referred to as the "Mexican Game", where airlines misled aviation authorities and its passengers about unscheduled stops on flights from Mexico? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2124.


Q-2125 — Mr. Lobb (Huron—Bruce) — With regard to government expenditures on Canada Goose products since November 4, 2015: what are the details of all expenditures, including (i) date, (ii) amount, (iii) description of the product, including the volume, (iv) rationale for the purchase, (v) file number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2125.


Q-2126 — Mr. Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan) — With regard to expenditures on hospitality by Environment and Climate Change Canada from December 2, 2018, through December 6, 2018: what are the details of each such expenditure, including (i) date, (ii) amount, (iii) location, (iv) vendor name, (v) number of individuals in attendance, (vi) description of the event, if applicable? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2126.


Q-2127 — Mr. Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly) — With regard to applications for grants and contributions to the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, the Canada Economic Development Agency for the Regions of Quebec, the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario, the Northern Ontario Economic Development Initiative and Western Economic Diversification Canada, since November 2015: (a) what applications were first approved by officials within the agencies and organizations listed above, but then rejected by the Office of the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, broken down by agency and organization; and (b) what applications were first refused by officials within the agencies and organizations listed above, but then approved by the Office of the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, broken down by agency and organization? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2127.


Q-2128 — Mr. Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly) — With regard to the pensions of Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) of federal agencies or other federal organizations, since November 2015: (a) how many CEOs are deemed not to be part of the public service for the purposes of the Public Service Superannuation Act; (b) how many times did a minister or any other public office holder order that a CEO be deemed to be part of the public service for the purposes of the Public Service Superannuation Act, broken down by (i) name of CEO, (ii) federal organization, (iii) minister or public office holder responsible for the order, (vi) the rationale behind the order; and (c) what is the estimated total pension income, broken down for each case where a CEO has been deemed part of the public service for the purposes of the Public Service Superannuation Act further to an order? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2128.


Q-2129 — Mr. Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly) — With regard to Health Canada’s re-evaluation decisions, including RVD2017-01, Glyphosate, and the “Monsanto Papers”: (a) how many and which studies are currently being re-evaluated by Health Canada; (b) for each of the studies in (a), when did Health Canada make the decision to re-evaluate it; (c) has Health Canada verified the independence of the studies in (a); (d) if the answer to (c) is affirmative, what was the detailed process for verifying the independence of the studies; and (e) does Health Canada have information that approved independent studies were written by Monsanto and, if so, since what date, broken down by study? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2129.


Q-2130 — Mr. Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly) — With regard to the taxation of businesses, since November 2015: (a) how many Canadian businesses have not paid tax for each of the following fiscal years (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018; and (b) how much tax was deferred by the businesses in (a) in fiscal years (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2130.


Q-2131 — Mr. Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan) — With regard to reports of a $355,950 sole-sourced contract to pay Torstar Corporation, which was cancelled following a complaint to the Procurement Ombudsman: (a) what was the original purpose of the contract; (b) which minister initially approved the contract; (c) does the government have enough employees to monitor parliamentary committees without hiring the Toronto Star; and (d) what is the total number of government employees whose job involved, in whole or in part, monitoring parliamentary committees? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2131.


Q-2132 — Mr. MacKenzie (Oxford) — With regard to classified and protected documents, since January 1, 2017, broken down by department or agency: (a) how many instances have occurred where it was discovered that classified or protected documents were left or stored in a manner which did not meet the requirements of the security level of the documents; (b) how many of the infractions in (a) occurred in the offices of ministerial exempt staff, including the staff of the Prime Minister, broken down by ministerial office; and (c) how many employees have lost their security clearance as a result of such infractions? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2132.


Q-2133 — Mr. MacKenzie (Oxford) — With regard to funding on infrastructure and the Prime Minister’s comment that “there are impacts when you bring construction workers into a rural area”: (a) does the Prime Minister’s comment represent the position of the government; (b) how many cities, towns, villages and rural municipalities have declined funding for infrastructure projects because such projects would involve bringing in construction workers; and (c) have any mayors or elected officials of rural towns or cities requested that the government not provide infrastructure funding for projects which would lead to more construction workers and, if so, which ones and what towns or cities do they represent? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2133.


Q-2134 — Mrs. McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo) — With regard to the MV Polar Prince and the Canada C3 expedition: (a) since the ship was certified to carry an aggregate of 60 individuals, including passengers, crew and special expedition personnel, why was the vessel over capacity for 6 of the 15 legs of the journey; (b) since the ship was certified to carry 12 passengers, why were more passengers onboard for all 15 legs of the journey; (c) was the Minister of Transport aware that the ship was carrying more individuals, and passengers in particular, than that for which it was certified; (d) if the answer to (c) is affirmative, when was the Minister made aware; and (e) did the Minister approve the vessel to be over capacity and, if so, why? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2134.


Q-2135 — Mrs. McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo) — With regard to the Department of Indigenous and Northern Affairs: what are the details of all lawsuits settled by the Department between January 2016 and December 2018, including (i) title of case, (ii) reason for lawsuit, (iii) litigants, (iv) legal fees, (v) fiscal total of the settlement? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2135.


Q-2136 — Mrs. McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo) — With regard to the government’s response to Q-1982 regarding the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada office located at 365 Hargrave Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba: (a) why was the government’s rationale for no longer allowing access to the general public without an appointment not provided in the response to Q-1982; (b) what is the government’s rationale for not allowing access to the general public without an appointment; (c) how many clients were served at this location between January 2015 and September 2018, broken down by month; and (d) what is the breakdown of (c) by purpose of visit (Employment Insurance, obtaining a status card, etc.)? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2136.


Q-2137 — Mr. Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George) — With regard to the government’s response to Q-2006 that the Global Affairs Summit Management Office did not incur any expenses for yoga teachers for the Prime Minister during the 2018 G7 Summit in Charlevoix: (a) did any other departments or agencies incur yoga-related expenses during the G7 Summit in Charlevoix and, if so, what are the details of such expenses, including amounts; and (b) who paid for the Prime Minister’s yoga instructor in Charlevoix during the time of the G7 Summit? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2137.


Q-2138 — Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington) — With regard to government and Canadian Armed Forces policies for the Vimy Officers’ Mess in Kingston, Ontario: (a) on what date was the booking accepted by the Department of National Defence or the Canadian Armed Forces for the December 19, 2018, Liberal Party fundraising event with the Prime Minister, which was subsequently cancelled; (b) what is the title of the individual who initially accepted the booking; (c) did the Privy Council Office advise the Office of the Prime Minister that attending a partisan event on Canadian Armed Forces property violated government policy and, if so, when was such advice given; and (d) why did the Prime Minister initially agree to attend an event which was in violation of government policy? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2138.


Q-2139 — Mr. Calkins (Red Deer—Lacombe) — With regard to Hillside Cottage (1915), the oldest structure in Banff National Park: (a) what measures are being undertaken to preserve and restore the structure; (b) what measures are in place to prevent the decay, vandalism or incidental destruction of the structure; and (c) what is being done to promote and recognize the history and significance of the structure? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2139.


Q-2140 — Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland) — With regard to the proposed Eagle Spirit Energy Corridor project for a pipeline between Fort McMurray, Alberta, and Grassy Point, British Columbia: (a) has the government conducted an analysis of the impact of Bill C-48, the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act, on the proposed project and, if so, what are the details of such an analysis, including the findings; and (b) will the government exempt vessels transporting oil in relation to the project from the moratorium proposed in Bill C-48? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2140.


Q-2141 — Mr. Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis) — With regard to the number of RCMP officers: (a) what is the total number of active RCMP officers as of (i) January 1, 2016, (ii) January 1, 2017, (iii) January 1, 2018, (iv) December 1, 2018; (b) what are the names and locations of each RCMP detachment; and (c) what is the breakdown of the number of RCMP officers assigned to each detachment as of (i) January 1, 2016, (ii) January 1, 2017, (iii) January 1, 2018, (iv) December 1, 2018? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2141.


Q-2142 — Mr. Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis) — With regard to government resources used to handle the situation involving illegal or irregular border crossers and asylum seekers, since January 1, 2016: what is the number of RCMP and CBSA personnel whose duties were, in whole or in part, assigned to handle the illegal or irregular border crossers, broken down by (i) province, (ii) month? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2142.

Q-2143 — Ms. Quach (Salaberry—Suroît) — With regard to the Minister of Youth, the Prime Minister’s Youth Council, the Youth Secretariat and the Youth Policy for Canada: (a) what is the decision-making flow chart for the Prime Minister’s Youth Council; (b) what is the total amount spent and the total budget for the Youth Council since it was established, broken down by year; (c) what amounts in the Youth Council budget are allocated for salaries, broken down by (i) year, (ii) position, (iii) per diem or any other reimbursement or expense (telecommunications, transportation, office supplies, furniture, etc.) offered or attributed to each of the positions mentioned in (c)(ii); (d) what are the dates, locations and number of participants for each of the meetings held by the Youth Council since June 2017, broken down by (i) in-person meetings, (ii) virtual meetings; (e) how much did the government spend to hold each of the Youth Council meetings mentioned in (d), broken down by (i) costs associated with renting a room, (ii) costs associated with food and drinks, (iii) costs associated with security, (iv) costs associated with transportation and the nature of this transportation, (v) costs associated with telecommunications; (f) what is the decision-making flow chart for the Youth Secreteriat of the Privy Council Office, including each of the positions associated with the Youth Secretariat; (g) what is the total amount spent and the total budget of the Youth Secretariat since it was established, broken down by year; (h) what amounts in the Youth Secretariat budget are allocated for salaries, broken down by (i) year, (ii) position, (iii) per diem or any other reimbursement or expense (telecommunications, transportation, office supplies, furniture, etc.) offered or attributed to each of the positions mentioned in (h)(ii); (i) what is the official mandate of the Youth Secretariat; ( j) what is the relationship between the Prime Minister’s Youth Council and the Youth Secretariat (organizational ties, financial ties, logistical support, etc.); (k) is the Youth Secretariat responsible for youth bursaries, services or programs; (l) if the answer to (k) is affirmative, what amounts were allocated to these bursaries, services or programs since they were established, broken down by (i) the nature of the bursary, service or program funded, (ii) the location of the program, (iii) the start and end date of the bursary, service or program; (m) who are all the people who are working or have worked on the Youth Policy for Canada as part of the Office of the Prime Minister or the Office of the Minister of Youth, broken down by role and by start and end date; (n) what consultations were carried out in connection with the youth policy, and what are the dates, locations and number of participants for each consultation held, as well as a description of the topics discussed, broken down by (i) in-person meetings, (ii) virtual meetings; and (o) how much did the government spend to hold each of the consultations mentioned in (n), broken down by (i) costs associated with renting a room, (ii) costs associated with food and drinks, (iii) costs associated with security, (iv) costs associated with transportation and the nature of this transportation, (v) costs associated with telecommunications? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2143.


Q-2145 — Mr. Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot) — With regard to the $19,682,232.17 spent by Environment and Climate Change Canada on payments to other international organizations (object code 2319) during the 2017-2018 fiscal year: what are the details of each expenditure, including (i) recipient, (ii) location of the recipient, (iii) purpose, (iv) date of the expenditure, (v) amount? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2145.


Q-2146 — Ms. Quach (Salaberry—Suroît) — With regard to the pipelines passing through the region of Vaudreuil-Soulanges: (a) since 2008, how many hydrostatic tests and any other safety tests (integrity, corrosion, etc.) have been conducted on all the pipelines over their entire length from Ontario to Quebec, broken down by (i) pipeline, (ii) type of test, (iii) date, (iv) federal entity or contractor, (v) test location and province, (vi) test result; (b) when requesting flow reversal for the 9B and Trans-Northern pipelines, did the government or any other entity calculate the greenhouse gas emissions upstream and downstream of the project; (c) if the answer in (b) is affirmative, what are the upstream and downstream emissions for each of the projects; (d) since 2008, how many leaks have there been on all the pipelines, in either Ontario or Quebec, broken down by (i) pipeline, (ii) location and province; (e) for each of the leaks in (d), what is (i) the quantity of the spill in litres, (ii) the company responsible for the pipeline, (iii) the direct or indirect cost to the federal government, (iv) the date of the spill, (v) the date on which the government or one of its regulatory agencies became aware of the spill; (f) since 2008, have the official emergency response plans been sent to the municipal public safety authorities and the regional county municipality for each of these pipelines; (g) if the answer in (f) is affirmative, for each plan sent, what is (i) the date it was sent, (ii) the date of confirmation of receipt, (iii) the names of the sender and the recipient; (h) since 2008, what are the details of all the cases of non-compliance, deficiencies and violations of federal laws and regulations found by the National Energy Board with respect to the pipelines, including (i) the date, (ii) a description of the deficiency found and the corrective action requested, (iii) the location of the deficiency, (iv) the pipeline and the name of the company that owns the pipeline, (v) the amount of the fine paid; (i) for each case of non-compliance, deficiency or violation in (h), on what exact date did the National Energy Board or a federal government department follow up with the respective companies and verify that the corrective action had been carried out; (j) for each follow-up in (i), what actions were taken; (k) since 2008, how many detection system failures have been identified by the National Energy Board on the pipelines and what are the details of each failure, including (i) the date, (ii) the pipeline, (iii) the location, (iv) the reason for the failure; (l) for each pipeline, in the event of a spill in the Soulanges area, what is the expected time (i) to detect it, (ii) to stop the flow of oil, (iii) for emergency services to arrive on site; and (m) where are the companies that have been hired to respond to a spill in the Soulanges area and how long will it take them to arrive on site? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2146.


Q-2147 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — With respect to the Energy Services Acquisition Program and the modernization plan for the five heating and cooling plants and the associated infrastructure, including pipes and tunnels, in the National Capital Region: (a) has the government conducted any studies or evaluations of the plan, including but not limited to (i) a cost-benefit analysis of proceeding with the plan as a public-private partnership as opposed to a fully public implementation, (ii) an estimate of the plan’s impact on the heating and cooling plants’ greenhouse gas emissions; (b) for each study in (a), what are the details, including (i) dates, (ii) titles, (iii) file numbers, (iv) value for money analysis, (v) metrics developed to assess the benefits of using the public private contract; (c) what are the consequences of this privatization with respect to (i) the number of public service jobs required for the maintenance and operation of the heating and cooling plants, (ii) the reliability of the heating and cooling plants, in particular, during extended power outages and when emergency repairs are required, (iii) site security and the security impact for any buildings served by the heating and cooling plants; (d) in what way were the relevant public sector unions informed of the plan, including (i) dates, (ii) process for consultation, (iii) timeline for participation; (e) in what ways was the input from the relevant public sector unions considered in the decision to move forward with the plan; (f) in what ways were the associated public unions informed of the ultimate decision; and (g) what are the projected impacts and planned changes on (i) the municipal infrastructure, (ii) the rest of the system outside of the heating and cooling plants themselves? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2147.


Q-2148 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — With respect to the document “Allocations from Treasury Board Central Votes for Supplementary Estimates (A), 2018-19”, published online: (a) for each allocation from “Vote 25 – Operating Budget Carry Forward” and “Vote 35 – Capital Budget Carry Forward” to a given “Organization”, what is the corresponding “Authority”; and (b) why are authorities listed proactively for each allocation under “Vote 5 – Government Contingencies” and “Vote 40 – Budget Implementation”, but not those under “Vote 25 – Operating Budget Carry Forward” and “Vote 35 – Capital Budget Carry Forward”? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2148.

Government Orders

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change), seconded by Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons), — That a Message be sent to the Senate to acquaint Their Honours that, in relation to Bill C-57, An Act to amend the Federal Sustainable Development Act, the House:

agrees with amendments 1 and 3 made by the Senate;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 2 because the amendment seeks to legislate employment matters which are beyond the policy intent of the bill, whose purpose is to make decision-making related to sustainable development more transparent and accountable to Parliament.

The debate continued.

The question was put on the motion and, pursuant to Standing Order 45, the recorded division was deferred until Tuesday, January 29, 2019, at the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders.

Returns and Reports Deposited with the Clerk of the House

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(1), papers deposited with the Clerk of the House were laid upon the Table as follows:

— by Mr. Champagne (Minister of Infrastructure and Communities) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the 51st Report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, "Report 4, Replacing Montréal’s Champlain Bridge—Infrastructure Canada, of the 2018 Spring Reports of the Auditor General of Canada" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-453), presented to the House on Thursday, October 4, 2018. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-421-453.

— by Mr. Hussen (Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the 20th Report of the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration, "Responding to Public Complaints: A Review of the Appointment, Training and Complaint Processes of the Immigration and Refugee Board" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-446), presented to the House on Monday, September 17, 2018. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-421-446.

Adjournment Proceedings

At 6:29 p.m., by unanimous consent, the question “That this House do now adjourn” was deemed to have been proposed.

After debate, the question was deemed to have been adopted.

Accordingly, at 6:58 p.m., the Speaker adjourned the House until tomorrow at 10:00 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 24(1).