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HOUSE OF COMMONS OF CANADA
42nd PARLIAMENT, 1st SESSION

Journals

No. 353

Monday, November 19, 2018

11:00 a.m.



Prayer
Private Members' Business

At 11:00 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 30(6), the House proceeded to the consideration of Private Members' Business.

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Fonseca (Mississauga East—Cooksville), seconded by Mr. Tabbara (Kitchener South—Hespeler), — That the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities be instructed to undertake a study on the labour shortages of the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, to consider, among other things, (i) the challenges associated with a lack of skilled workers in the construction industry, (ii) possible recommendations on how to increase construction skill development in the region, (iii) analysis of the Atlantic Immigration Pilot initiatives as a model to address the skilled worker need in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area; and that the Committee report its findings to the House within six months of the adoption of this motion. (Private Members' Business M-190)

The debate continued.

The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to.

Business of Supply

The Order was read for the consideration of the Business of Supply.

Mr. Poilievre (Carleton), seconded by Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent), moved, — That the House call on the government to tell Canadians in what year the budget will be balanced, and to do so in this week’s Fall Economic Statement.

Debate arose thereon.

Statements By Members

Pursuant to Standing Order 31, Members made statements.

Oral Questions

Pursuant to Standing Order 30(5), the House proceeded to Oral Questions.

Daily Routine Of Business

Tabling of Documents

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:

— Nos. 421-02670, 421-02705 and 421-02729 concerning the pension system. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-98-09;

— Nos. 421-02693 and 421-02775 concerning land use. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-171-03;

— Nos. 421-02694 and 421-02846 concerning China. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-13-28;

— No. 421-02701 concerning environmental pollution. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-220-02;

— Nos. 421-02704, 421-02740 and 421-02767 concerning health care services. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-31-50;

— No. 421-02715 concerning working conditions. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-102-02;

— No. 421-02717 concerning cannabis. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-93-09;

— No. 421-02719 concerning discrimination. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-32-33;

— No. 421-02720 concerning the tax system. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-1-37;

— No. 421-02721 concerning Canadian citizenship. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-89-06;

— No. 421-02722 concerning navigable waters. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-101-28;

— No. 421-02723 concerning the commercial development of land. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-225-01;

— Nos. 421-02759, 421-02777 and 421-02855 concerning Canadian heritage. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-88-08;

— No. 421-02801 concerning the protection of the environment. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-3-61;

— Nos. 421-02859, 421-02861, 421-02862, 421-02866, 421-02873, 421-02883, 421-02884 and 421-02886 concerning organ transplants. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-138-11.


Presenting Reports from Committees

Mr. May (Cambridge), from the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, presented the 13th Report of the Committee (Bill C-81, An Act to ensure a barrier-free Canada, with amendments). — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-471.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 112, 113, 115 to 119, 123 and 124) was tabled.


Mr. Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot), from the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, presented the 53rd Report of the Committee, "Report 1, Building and Implementing the Phoenix Pay System, of the 2018 Spring Reports of the Auditor General of Canada". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-472.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 105 and 118) was tabled.


Presenting Petitions

Pursuant to Standing Order 36, petitions certified by the Clerk of Petitions were presented as follows:

— by Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-02901);

— by Ms. Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona), two concerning health care services (Nos. 421-02902 and 421-02903);

— by Mr. Aldag (Cloverdale—Langley City), five concerning national historic sites (Nos. 421-02904 to 421-02908);

— by Mrs. Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-02909);

— by Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford), one concerning Old Age Security benefits (No. 421-02910);

— by Mr. Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville), one concerning fibromyalgia (No. 421-02911);

— by Mr. Warawa (Langley—Aldergrove), one concerning the elderly (No. 421-02912) and one concerning the pension system (No. 421-02913);

— by Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe), one concerning the Canada Post Corporation (No. 421-02914) and one concerning the pension system (No. 421-02915);

— by Mr. Kent (Thornhill), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-02916);

— by Ms. Boutin-Sweet (Hochelaga), one concerning the tax system (No. 421-02917);

— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning cruelty to animals (No. 421-02918);

— by Mrs. Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing), one concerning health care services (No. 421-02919).


Questions on the Order Paper

Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the answers to questions Q-1934, Q-1935, Q-1944, Q-1949, Q-1950, Q-1953, Q-1954, Q-1956, Q-1965, and Q-1966 on the Order Paper.


Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into Orders for Return:

Q-1933 — Mr. McColeman (Brantford—Brant) — With regard to the Veterans Affairs Canada service standard of 16 weeks in regards to decisions for disability benefit applicants for the 2017-18 fiscal year, or the last year in which statistics are available: how many and what percentage of applications received a decision within (i) the 16-week standard, (ii) between 16 and 26 weeks, (iii) greater than 26 weeks (6 months), (iv) greater than a year? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1933.


Q-1936 — Mrs. Zahid (Scarborough Centre) — With regard to the National Joint Council’s Relocation Directive, which reimburses federal employees when relocating for work, for the calendar years 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015: (a) how many employees, agents, or contractors of the federal government made claims for relocation funding each year, broken down by government department or agency; (b) how many employees, agents, or contractors of the federal government were provided with reimbursement for relocation each year, broken down by government department or agency; (c) in the instances where relocation funding was provided, how many instances arose from employer-requested relocation in each year; (d) in the instances where relocation funding was provided, how many instances arose from employee-requested relocation in each year; (e) what was the annual aggregate amount in Canadian dollars spent by each government agency or department in remitting relocation funding, broken down by the benefit categories outlined in appendix B of the National Joint Council’s Relocation Directive; (f) which employees, agents, or contractors of the federal government received relocation funding in each year, itemized to include their agency or department, their job title, the amount of relocation funding remitted, broken down by the benefit categories outlined in appendix B of the National Joint Council’s Relocation Directive, and where the individual was relocated from and to; (g) what is the aggregate amount of funding, across all government departments and agencies, remitted in each year under the Relocation Directive’s benefit categories that pertain to real estate commission and realtor fees; (h) what is the aggregate amount of funding, across all government departments and agencies, remitted in each year under the Relocation Directive’s benefit categories that pertain to home equity loss; and (i) what is the aggregate amount of funding, across all government departments and agencies, remitted in each year under the Relocation Directive’s benefit categories that pertain to mortgages, mortgage default insurance, and mortgage paydown penalties? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1936.


Q-1937 — Mr. Saroya (Markham—Unionville) — With regard to the online application system run by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada: (a) how many hours has the online system been down in total since January 1, 2017; and (b) what is the number of hours the online system has been down, broken down by week, since January 1, 2017? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1937.


Q-1938 — Mr. Calkins (Red Deer—Lacombe) — With regard to the comments made by the Prime Minister on September 25, 2018, in relation to the 2015 election that Canada did not have “much direct interference” by Russia: in what specific ways did Russia interfere in the 2015 election? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1938.


Q-1939 — Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — With regard to the Churchill Rail Line: (a) what are the details of all correspondence, including electronic, that the government has sent or received, since November 4, 2015, including (i) sender, (ii) recipient, (iii) date, (iv) title and subject matter, (v) description or summary of contents, (vi) file number; and (b) what are the details of all memorandums about the Churchill Rail Line, including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipient, (iv) title and subject matter, (v) file number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1939.


Q-1940 — Mr. McCauley (Edmonton West) — With regard to the Joint Support Ship (JSS) project: (a) how many extensions have occurred since the project’s inception; (b) what are the costs associated with the extensions to date; (c) how many amendments have occurred since the project’s inception; (d) what are the costs associated with the amendments to date; (e) how many full-time equivalents work on the project; (f) are there any anticipated lay-offs occurring from project extensions and amendments and, if so, how many; and (g) what are the rationales for each instance of an extension and amendment to date? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1940.


Q-1941 — Mr. McCauley (Edmonton West) — With regard to the Public Service Pay Centre in Miramichi, since December 1, 2015, broken down by year: (a) how much has been spent on employee overtime for those working at the Centre; and (b) of the employees in (a), how many hours have been logged, broken down by amount paid out per person and job title? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1941.


Q-1942 — Mr. McCauley (Edmonton West) — With regard to the air travellers security surcharge since January 1, 2016: (a) how much is collected from passengers, broken down into averages for (i) day, (ii) month, (iii) year; (b) how much is used to pay for security services; (c) what other programs or services are funded with the security surcharge; and (d) of the programs in (c), how much funding did each program receive? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1942.


Q-1943 — Mr. McCauley (Edmonton West) — With regard to the Senate Advisory Board within the Privy Council Office, since January 1, 2018: (a) what are the full job descriptions as they are written for each job posting within the secretariat to the Senate Advisory Board; (b) what is the pay scale and occupational group and level of the positions being filled in the secretariat to the Senate Advisory Board; (c) what is the budget for the occupational group assigned to the secretariat to the Senate Advisory Board; (d) how much has been spent by the secretariat to the Senate Advisory Board, broken down by (i) accommodation, (ii) travel, (iii) per diems, (iv) incidentals, (v) office renovation, (vi) office set-up; (e) how much has been budgeted for the support group to the Senate selection group; (f) how many openings were posted in this time period, broken down by province; (g) how many resumes were received for each opening; and (h) how many interviews were facilitated for each opening? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1943.


Q-1945 — Mr. Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge) — With regard to the requirement for dissolving corporations to apply for and receive tax clearance certificates from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) before disbursing remaining capital to investors: (a) how many applications for tax clearance certificates are in process at the CRA at this time; (b) what is the CRA’s target for processing tax clearance certificate applications; (c) for each year between 2014 and 2018, what percentage of applications for tax clearance certificates did the CRA process within its target timeline; (d) for each year in (c), what was the average processing time for tax clearance certificate applications; (e) for each year in (c), what was the average value of capital awaiting disbursal while a tax clearance certificate application was in process; (f) for each year in (c), what was the aggregate value of capital awaiting disbursal further to processed tax clearance certificates; (g) what is the aggregate value of capital awaiting disbursal further to applications for tax clearance certificates at this time; and (h) what is the average value of capital awaiting disbursal further to applications for tax clearance certificates at this time? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1945.


Q-1946 — Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — With regard to the Department of Veterans Affairs, what was the total allotments, expenditures and amount and percentage of all “lapsed spending“ for the 2017-18 fiscal year? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1946.


Q-1947 — Mr. Anderson (Cypress Hills—Grasslands) — With regard to the Prime Minister’s trip to the United Nations in September 2018: (a) what is the complete list of world leaders with whom the Prime Minister had official meetings; (b) what topics were discussed at each of the meetings in (a); (c) what was the government’s objective or reason for each meeting in (a); and (d) what was the date of each meeting in (a)? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1947.


Q-1948 — Mr. Anderson (Cypress Hills—Grasslands) — With regard to the Prime Minister’s comments on September 26, 2018, that “Conversations I've had with Cuban leadership over the course of my tenure have always included human rights and a push for better respect for democracy”: (a) what are the details of all such conversations, including (i) date, (ii) with whom the conversation was held, (iii) specific topics raised; and (b) what are the details of any specific commitments which the Prime Minister received from the Cuban leadership related to human rights or democracy, including (i) date of commitment, (ii) who gave the commitment, (iii) summary or contents of commitment? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1948.


Q-1951 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to the Elementary and Secondary Education and the High-Cost Special Education Programs: (a) how much money has been granted, awarded or transferred to Grassy Narrows First Nation and their education authority under the Elementary and Secondary Education Program’s special education services each year for the last ten years, with direct and indirect support reported separately; and (b) how much money has been granted, awarded or transferred to Grassy Narrows First Nation and their education authority under the High-Cost Special Education Program each year for the last ten years? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1951.


Q-1952 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to the Department of Indigenous Services and the Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs: (a) do the departments collect data about incidence and impacts (health, social, etc.) of mold in on-reserve housing; (b) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, (i) which First Nations communities, listed by region, reported incidents of mold in housing, (ii) how many such incidents did they report, (iii) what were the reported or assessed impacts; and (c) if the answer to (a) is negative, why do the departments not collect this information and do they plan to do so in the future? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1952.


Q-1955 — Mr. Anderson (Cypress Hills—Grasslands) — With regard to Correctional Service Canada: (a) how many individuals convicted of first-degree murder are in a minimum-security institution; (b) how many individuals convicted of second-degree murder are in a minimum-security institution; (c) how many individuals convicted of manslaughter are in a minimum-security institution; (d) of those individuals referred to in (a) through (c), how many of these convictions involved a child as a victim; (e) of those individuals referred to in (a) through (c), how many individuals are located in an Aboriginal healing lodge; (f) how many individuals are currently serving time in Aboriginal healing lodges; and (g) of the individuals in (f) how many are non-Aboriginal? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1955.


Q-1957 — Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland) — With regard to crude oil transportation by rail cars in Canada since November 2015: what are the government’s statistics or estimates on how much oil has been transported by rail each month? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1957.


Q-1958 — Mr. Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner) — With regard to inmates in facilities operated by Correctional Service Canada who have escaped custody or have been unlawfully at large: (a) how many individuals were unlawfully at large in (i) 2016, (ii) 2017, (iii) 2018 to date; (b) how many individuals are currently at large, as of the date of this question; and (c) what is the breakdown of (a) by correctional facility and by security classification? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1958.


Q-1959 — Mr. Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman) — With regard to Operation IMPACT, the Canadian Armed Forces’ (CAF) support to the Global Coalition to degrade and defeat Daesh in Iraq and Syria: (a) for what length of time will Operation IMPACT be extended beyond March of 2019; (b) will the total number of soldiers, sailors, airmen, airwomen, and highly-skilled CAF members deployed on Operation IMPACT increase, decrease, or remain the same between September 2018 and March 31, 2019; (c) what are the projected total expenditures related to an extension of Operation IMPACT, broken down by type of expenditure; (d) what amount of funding has been allocated to date in relation to the projected expenditures under (c); and (e) what are the reasons for the shift in nature of Operation IMPACT, announced on June 7, 2018, by the Chief of Defence Staff? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1959.


Q-1960 — Mr. Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman) — With regard to the potential adoption of a new standard camouflage pattern for the Canadian Armed Forces, and the subsequent replacement of the Canadian Disruptive Pattern (CADPAT) military equipment: (a) what is the deficiency being addressed by acquiring the MultiCam camouflage pattern over CADPAT; (b) does Defence Research and Development Canada endorse the deficiency used to justify buying a foreign camouflage pattern; (c) what consultations were done prior to adopting this policy; (d) what evidence is there that the transition to MultiCam over CADPAT will or will not increase survivability for Canadian Armed Forces members; (e) are there environments identified in which this camouflage is believed to be more effective or less effective in terms of concealment and survivability; (f) have there been concerns expressed about Canadian military personnel appearing very similar in the field to Russian, U.S. or other foreign militaries due to this camouflage transition; (g) has the benefit of replacing this perceived deficiency been weighed against the cost of Canadian factories losing business, or going out of business entirely; (h) have factories and manufacturers expressed to the Department of National Defence that they will be forced to go out of business if CADPAT is cancelled; (i) has the potential effects of adopting a U.S. camouflage pattern been considered in terms of effects to national identity and esprit de corps; and (j) has the fact that “1947 LLC” manufactures fabrics for military use in China been considered? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1960.


Q-1961 — Mr. Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman) — With regard to the Canadian weapons originally intended for distribution to the Kurdish Peshmerga: (a) what plans are currently in place or being considered regarding the future of weapons originally intended for the Kurdish Peshmerga; (b) in which locations and storage facilities are these weapons currently being stored, either domestic and international; and (c) what are the specific types, quantities, and commercial values of these weapons? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1961.


Q-1962 — Ms. Gladu (Sarnia—Lambton) — With regard to reports that Health Canada is considering shutting down or cutting funding to certain organizations, and that a gag order has been issued to the affected organizations not to discuss the matter, namely Mental Health Commission of Canada, Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction, Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health, Canadian Institute for Health Information, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement, Canada Health Infoway, Canadian Patient Safety Institute, Canadian Partnership Against Cancer: (a) why is the government reviewing the funding that these organizations receive; (b) why have each of the organizations been given a gag order; (c) was the Minister of Health’s office made aware of the gag order and, if so, on what date; (d) was the Office of the Prime Minister informed that a gag order was being issued and if so, on what date; (e) what is the complete list of organizations which were subject to the External Review of the Federally Funded Pan-Canadian Health Organizations; (f) has anyone from Health Canada, the Minister of Health’s office, or Deloitte instructed or advised any of the organizations subject to the review not to publicly discuss the review; (g) if the answer to (f) is affirmative, what are the details of any such non-disclosure clause or gag order including (i) who issued the order, (ii) date of the order, (iii) scope of the gag order; (h) have any of the organizations in (e) been told that they will lose their funding, in whole or in part, and if so, which organizations have been notified of this decision; and (i) for each organization whose funding is being eliminated or reduced, what is the rationale being used by the Minister of Health for the funding reduction? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1962.


Q-1963 — Mr. MacKenzie (Oxford) — With regard to the transfer of Terri-Lynne McClintic from the Grand Valley Institution for Women to the Okimaw Ohci Healing Lodge: (a) on what date did the transfer occur; (b) on what date did the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness become aware of the transfer; (c) did the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness approve the transfer; (d) on what date did the Office of the Prime Minister become aware of the transfer; and (e) did the Prime Minister or anyone in his office approve the transfer? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1963.


Q-1964 — Mr. Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill) — With regard to the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, since January 1, 2016: (a) how many Canadian businesses are investing in projects in the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank broken down by year; (b) how much Canadian money is spent on projects in the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank broken down by year; and (c) of the projects listed in (a), how many of these businesses are operating through, either directly or indirectly, the Canadian Government? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1964.


Q-1967 — Ms. Bergen (Portage—Lisgar) — With regard to government procedures in relation to accusations of harassment or misconduct: (a) what is the procedure when there is an accusation against the Prime Minister, including (i) who decides if a complaint has merit and warrants an investigation, (ii) who conducts the investigation, (iii) does the individual conducting the investigation have the ability to recommend sanctions, (iv) are the recommended sanctions binding, (v) what is the policy regarding whether or not the reports and findings are released to the public, (vi) what mechanism, if any, exists for the temporary suspension of certain duties of the Prime Minister pending the outcome of an investigation; and (b) does the procedure in (a) apply to incidents which occurred prior to the individual becoming Prime Minister? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1967.


Q-1968 — Ms. Bergen (Portage—Lisgar) — With regard to government procedures in relation to accusations of harassment or misconduct: (a) what is the procedure when there is an accusation against a cabinet minister, including (i) who decides if a complaint has merit and warrants an investigation, (ii) who conducts the investigation, (iii) does the individual conducting the investigation have the ability to recommend sanctions, (iv) are the recommended sanctions binding, (v) what is the policy regarding whether or not the reports and findings are released to the public, (vi) what is the criteria for deciding if a Member is to be removed from Cabinet pending the outcome of an investigation; and (b) does the procedure in (a) apply to incidents which occurred prior to the individual becoming a cabinet minister? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1968.


Q-1969 — Mr. Diotte (Edmonton Griesbach) — With regard to International Mobility Program work permit holders under the Canada-International Agreements section, and broken down by each of the four rows (NAFTA, FTA, GATS and non-trade): for each of the past ten years, what is the number of permit holders for each row who came from (i) the United States, (ii) Mexico? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1969.


Q-1970 — Mrs. Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster) — With regard to all government contracts awarded for public relations services, since November 4, 2015, and broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation, or other government entity: what are the details of these contracts including (i) date of contract, (ii) value of contract, (iii) vendor name, (iv) file number, (v) description of services provided, (vi) title of public relations campaign related to contract (vii) start and end dates of services provided? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1970.


Q-1971 — Mrs. Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster) — With regard to the new round of consultations announced on October 3, 2018, in relation to the Trans Mountain Pipeline by the government: what is the complete list of individuals, First Nations and organizations which the government is planning on consulting? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1971.


Q-1972 — Mrs. Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster) — With regard to all expenditures on hospitality since June 11, 2018, broken down by department or agency: what are the details of all expenditures, including (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) date of expenditure, (iv) start and end date of contract, (v) description of goods or services provided, (vi) file number, (vii) number of government employees in attendance, (viii) number of other attendees, (ix) location? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1972.


Q-1973 — Mr. Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend) — With regard to the Champlain Bridge project: (a) what are the details of all expenditures since November 4, 2015, related to the project, including (i) vendor, (ii) date, (iii) amount, (iv) description of goods or services; (b) what is the total of all expenditures in (a); (c) what is the total projected cost of the project, including a breakdown by type of expense; and (d) what are the details of any projected costs not yet incurred, broken down by type of expense? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1973.


Q-1974 — Mr. Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola) — With regard to the bike and walking trail that connects Tofino and Ucluelet in the Pacific Rim National Park: (a) what was the original projected cost of completing the trail; (b) what is the current estimated cost of completing the trail; (c) how was the current route chosen and what was the rationale for choosing the route; (d) what are the details of any environmental impact studies completed related to the construction of the trail, including (i) findings, (ii) who conducted the studies, (iii) date the studies were completed, (iv) website address where the findings can be found, if applicable; (e) what are the details of all consultations conducted in relation to the trail with (i) local governments, (ii) local residents, (iii) other organizations or individuals; and (f) what are the details of all work completed to date, including how much of the trail is currently completed? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1974.

Business of Supply

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Poilievre (Carleton), seconded by Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent), in relation to the Business of Supply.

The debate continued.

At 6:15 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 81(16), the Speaker interrupted the proceedings.

The question was put on the motion and, pursuant to Standing Order 45, the recorded division was deferred until Tuesday, November 20, 2018, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.

Notices of Motions

Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) gave notice of the intention to move a motion at the next sitting of the House, pursuant to Standing Order 78(3), for the purpose of allotting a specified number of days or hours for the consideration and disposal of the report stage and third reading stage of Bill C-75, An Act to amend the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other Acts and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.

Private Members' Business

At 6:17 p.m., by unanimous consent and pursuant to Standing Order 30(7), the House proceeded to the consideration of Private Members' Business.

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville), seconded by Mr. Longfield (Guelph), — That the House: (a) reiterate its commitment to facilitate collaboration on an organ and tissue donation and transplantation system that gives Canadians timely and effective access to care, since every year more than 250 people, out of the 4,500 on waiting lists, die without receiving a transplant; and (b) urge the government to support national efforts with provincial and territorial authorities and stakeholders to increase organ and tissue donation rates in Canada through public education and awareness campaigns, ongoing communication and the exchange of information, including best practices. (Private Members' Business M-189)

The debate continued.

The question was put on the motion and, pursuant to Standing Order 93(1), the recorded division was deferred until Wednesday, November 21, 2018, immediately before the time provided for Private Members' Business.

Returns and Reports Deposited with the Clerk of the House

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(1), papers deposited with the Clerk of the House were laid upon the Table as follows:

— by Ms. Joly (Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie) — Report on Official Languages for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2017, pursuant to the Official Languages Act, R.S. 1985, c. 31 (4th Supp.), s. 44. — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-565-03. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Joint Committee on Official Languages)

— by Ms. McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change) — Amendments to the Management Plan for the Gwaii Haanas Gina ‘Waadluxan KilGulGa Land-Sea-People, pursuant to the Canada National Parks Act, S.C. 2000, c. 32, sbs. 11(2) and to the Parks Canada Agency Act, S.C. 1998, c. 31, sbs. 32(2). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-566-14. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development)

Petitions Filed with the Clerk of the House

Pursuant to Standing Order 36, petitions certified by the Clerk of Petitions were filed as follows:

— by Mr. McCauley (Edmonton West), one concerning China (No. 421-02920);

— by Mr. Warawa (Langley—Aldergrove), one concerning euthanasia (No. 421-02921).

Adjournment Proceedings

At 7:12 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 38(1), the question “That this House do now adjourn” was deemed to have been proposed.

After debate, the question was deemed to have been adopted.

Accordingly, at 7:30 p.m., the Speaker adjourned the House until tomorrow at 10:00 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 24(1).