Skip to main content Start of content

House Publications

The Debates are the report—transcribed, edited, and corrected—of what is said in the House. The Journals are the official record of the decisions and other transactions of the House. The Order Paper and Notice Paper contains the listing of all items that may be brought forward on a particular sitting day, and notices for upcoming items.

For an advanced search, use Publication Search tool.

If you have any questions or comments regarding the accessibility of this publication, please contact us at accessible@parl.gc.ca.

Previous day publication Next day publication
42nd PARLIAMENT, 1st SESSION

Journals

No. 316

Monday, June 18, 2018

11:00 a.m.



Prayer
Private Members' Business

At 11:00 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 30(6), the House proceeded to the consideration of Private Members' Business.

The Order was read for the third reading of Bill S-210, An Act to amend An Act to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the Civil Marriage Act and the Criminal Code and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.

Mr. Aldag (Cloverdale—Langley City), seconded by Ms. Ludwig (New Brunswick Southwest), moved, — That the Bill be now read a third time and do pass.

Debate arose thereon.

The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to.

Accordingly, the Bill was read the third time and passed.

Interruption

At 11:27 a.m., the sitting was suspended.

At 12:00 p.m., the sitting resumed.

Government Orders

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. Wilson-Raybould (Minister of Justice), seconded by Ms. Hajdu (Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour), — That a message be sent to the Senate to acquaint their Honours that, in relation to Bill C-45, An Act respecting cannabis and to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Criminal Code and other Acts, the House:

agrees with amendments 1, 2, 5, 6, 10, 11(b) and (c), 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17(b), 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 34, 35, 36 and 37 made by the Senate;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 3 because the government has been clear that provinces and territories are able to make additional restrictions on personal cultivation but that it is critically important to permit personal cultivation in order to support the government’s objective of displacing the illegal market;
respectfully disagrees with amendments 4, 11(a) and 38 because they would be contrary to the stated purpose of the Cannabis Act to protect the health of young persons by restricting their access to cannabis;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 7 because the criminal penalties and the immigration consequences aim to prevent young people from accessing cannabis and to deter criminal activity by imposing serious criminal penalties for prohibited activities, including importing and exporting cannabis and using a young person to commit cannabis-related offences;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 8 because the Cannabis Act already includes comprehensive restrictions on promotion;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 9 because the government has already committed to establishing THC limits in regulations, which will provide flexibility to make future adjustments based on new evidence and product innovation;
respectfully disagrees with amendments 17(a) and 25 because other Senate amendments that the House is accepting would provide the Minister with expanded powers to require security clearances, and because amendments 17(a) and 25 would present significant operational challenges and privacy concerns;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 23 because law enforcement has an obligation to maintain evidence unless there is a risk to health and safety, and provisions currently exist in the Cannabis Act to provide compensation should evidence be disposed of and ordered to be returned;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 26 because mechanisms already exist to provide for public scrutiny of federal regulations;
proposes that amendment 31 be amended by replacing the text of section 151.1 with the following text:
“151.1 (1) Three years after this section comes into force, the Minister must cause a review of this Act and its administration and operation to be conducted, including a review of the impact of this Act on public health and, in particular, on the health and consumption habits of young persons in respect of cannabis use, the impact of cannabis on Indigenous persons and communities, and the impact of the cultivation of cannabis plants in a dwelling-house.
(2) No later than 18 months after the day on which the review begins, the Minister must cause a report on the review, including any findings or recommendations resulting from it, to be laid before each House of Parliament.”;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 32 because the Bill already provides for a comprehensive review of the core objectives of the Cannabis Act, including a requirement to table a report in Parliament and because the suggested amendment to amendment 31 provides for a review of the public health impacts of the Cannabis Act;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 33 because Parliament already has broad discretion to initiate studies of specific matters by parliamentary committees, and because the Bill already provides for a comprehensive review of the Cannabis Act, including a requirement to table a report in Parliament.

The debate continued.

The question was put on the motion and, pursuant to Order made Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the recorded division was deferred until later today, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.

Statements By Members

Pursuant to Standing Order 31, Members made statements.

Oral Questions

Pursuant to Standing Order 30(5), the House proceeded to Oral Questions.

Deferred Recorded Divisions

Government Orders

Pursuant to Order made Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Ms. Wilson-Raybould (Minister of Justice), seconded by Ms. Hajdu (Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour), — That a message be sent to the Senate to acquaint their Honours that, in relation to Bill C-45, An Act respecting cannabis and to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Criminal Code and other Acts, the House:

agrees with amendments 1, 2, 5, 6, 10, 11(b) and (c), 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17(b), 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 34, 35, 36 and 37 made by the Senate;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 3 because the government has been clear that provinces and territories are able to make additional restrictions on personal cultivation but that it is critically important to permit personal cultivation in order to support the government’s objective of displacing the illegal market;
respectfully disagrees with amendments 4, 11(a) and 38 because they would be contrary to the stated purpose of the Cannabis Act to protect the health of young persons by restricting their access to cannabis;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 7 because the criminal penalties and the immigration consequences aim to prevent young people from accessing cannabis and to deter criminal activity by imposing serious criminal penalties for prohibited activities, including importing and exporting cannabis and using a young person to commit cannabis-related offences;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 8 because the Cannabis Act already includes comprehensive restrictions on promotion;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 9 because the government has already committed to establishing THC limits in regulations, which will provide flexibility to make future adjustments based on new evidence and product innovation;
respectfully disagrees with amendments 17(a) and 25 because other Senate amendments that the House is accepting would provide the Minister with expanded powers to require security clearances, and because amendments 17(a) and 25 would present significant operational challenges and privacy concerns;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 23 because law enforcement has an obligation to maintain evidence unless there is a risk to health and safety, and provisions currently exist in the Cannabis Act to provide compensation should evidence be disposed of and ordered to be returned;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 26 because mechanisms already exist to provide for public scrutiny of federal regulations;
proposes that amendment 31 be amended by replacing the text of section 151.1 with the following text:
“151.1 (1) Three years after this section comes into force, the Minister must cause a review of this Act and its administration and operation to be conducted, including a review of the impact of this Act on public health and, in particular, on the health and consumption habits of young persons in respect of cannabis use, the impact of cannabis on Indigenous persons and communities, and the impact of the cultivation of cannabis plants in a dwelling-house.
(2) No later than 18 months after the day on which the review begins, the Minister must cause a report on the review, including any findings or recommendations resulting from it, to be laid before each House of Parliament.”;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 32 because the Bill already provides for a comprehensive review of the core objectives of the Cannabis Act, including a requirement to table a report in Parliament and because the suggested amendment to amendment 31 provides for a review of the public health impacts of the Cannabis Act;
respectfully disagrees with amendment 33 because Parliament already has broad discretion to initiate studies of specific matters by parliamentary committees, and because the Bill already provides for a comprehensive review of the Cannabis Act, including a requirement to table a report in Parliament.

The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:

(Division No. 868 -- Vote no 868)
YEAS: 205, NAYS: 82

YEAS -- POUR

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Anandasangaree
Arseneault
Arya
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Bains
Baylis
Beech
Bennett
Benson
Bibeau
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Boissonnault
Bossio
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Cannings
Caron
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Choquette
Christopherson
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
Davies
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Donnelly
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg

Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona)
Dusseault
Dzerowicz
Easter
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fergus
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Freeland
Fuhr
Garneau
Garrison
Gerretsen
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Grewal
Hardie
Harvey
Hehr
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Johns
Jolibois
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Kang
Khalid
Khera
Kwan

Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lightbound
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Malcolmson
Maloney
Masse (Windsor West)
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
Mathyssen
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morneau
Morrissey
Nassif
Nault
Ng
O'Connell
Oliphant
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott

Picard
Poissant
Quach
Qualtrough
Rankin
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Sajjan
Samson
Sangha
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schiefke
Schulte
Serré
Sgro
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Sorbara
Spengemann
Stewart
Tabbara
Tan
Tassi
Tootoo
Trudeau
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Weir
Whalen
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 205

NAYS -- CONTRE

Aboultaif
Albas
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Arnold
Barlow
Beaulieu
Benzen
Bernier
Berthold
Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis)
Block
Boucher
Brassard
Carrie
Chong
Clement
Cooper
Deltell
Diotte

Doherty
Dreeshen
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Finley
Fortin
Gallant
Généreux
Genuis
Harder
Hoback
Jeneroux
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kusie
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Leitch
Liepert

Lloyd
Lobb
MacKenzie
Maguire
Marcil
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Motz
Nater
Nicholson
O'Toole
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Plamondon
Poilievre
Reid
Rempel
Richards
Saroya
Scheer
Schmale

Shields
Sorenson
Stanton
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Thériault
Tilson
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vecchio
Viersen
Wagantall
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Wong
Yurdiga

Total: -- 82

PAIRED -- PAIRÉS

Nil--Aucun

Daily Routine Of Business

Tabling of Documents

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:

— Nos. 421-02307 and 421-02311 concerning the Canada Post Corporation. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-36-14;
— No. 421-02308 concerning pornography. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-69-02;
— No. 421-02309 concerning foreign policy. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-87-04;
— No. 421-02310 concerning VIA Rail. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-206-02;
— No. 421-02313 concerning medical devices. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-210-02;
— No. 421-02315 concerning Old Age Security benefits. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-29-05;
— Nos. 421-02317, 421-02320, 421-02321, 421-02323, 421-02325 and 421-02327 concerning discrimination. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-32-22;
— Nos. 421-02318 and 421-02319 concerning the protection of the environment. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-3-54;
— No. 421-02322 concerning marine transportation. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-92-12;
— No. 421-02324 concerning books. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-211-01;
— No. 421-02326 concerning navigable waters. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-101-21;
— No. 421-02328 concerning firearms. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-53-09;
— No. 421-02329 concerning sex selection. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-25-17.

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Ms. Goldsmith-Jones (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade) laid upon the Table, — Document entitled "Office of the Extractive Sector Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Counsellor — 2017 Annual Report to Parliament (June 2016 to May 2017)". — Sessional Paper No. 8525-421-70.

Presenting Reports from Interparliamentary Delegations













Presenting Reports from Committees

Mr. Paradis (Brome—Missisquoi), from the Standing Committee on Official Languages, presented the 11th Report of the Committee, "Media in the Digital Age: Reconciling Federal Responsibilities to Official Language Minority Communities with New Trends". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-428.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 88, 89, 94 to 96, 103 and 105 to 107) was tabled.


Mrs. Schulte (King—Vaughan), from the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, presented the 17th Report of the Committee, "Better Buildings for a Low-Carbon Future". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-429.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 93 to 96, 115, 116, 119 and 120) was tabled.


Mr. Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country), from the Standing Committee on National Defence, presented the Tenth Report of the Committee, "Canada and NATO: An Alliance Forged in Strength and Reliability". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-430.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 55, 60, 67 to 71, 77 to 83, 85, 87 to 89, 95 to 97 and 99 to 102) was tabled.


Mr. McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood), from the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, presented the 22nd Report of the Committee, "Indigenous People in the Federal Correctional System ". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-431.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 81, 83, 85 to 87, 109, 110 and 122) was tabled.


Mr. McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood), from the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, presented the 23rd Report of the Committee (Recommendations in relation to the study of Bill C-71, An Act to amend certain Acts and Regulations in relation to firearms). — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-432.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 112 and 114 to 120) was tabled.


Mr. McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood), from the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, presented the 24th Report of the Committee (Recommendations in relation to the study of Bill C-71, An Act to amend certain Acts and Regulations in relation to firearms). — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-433.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 112 and 114 to 120) was tabled.


Mr. Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville), from the Standing Joint Committee on the Library of Parliament, presented the Second Report of the Committee, "Certificate of Nomination of Heather P. Lank to the Position of Parliamentary Librarian". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-434.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meeting No. 4) was tabled.


Introduction of Private Members' Bills

Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Tilson (Dufferin—Caledon), seconded by Mr. Falk (Provencher), Bill C-409, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (threat to publish intimate images), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola), seconded by Mr. Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend), Bill C-410, An Act to amend the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (property of bankrupt — exclusion), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


Presenting Petitions

Pursuant to Standing Order 36, petitions certified by the Clerk of Petitions were presented as follows:

— by Mrs. Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing), one concerning rail transportation (No. 421-02480);
— by Mr. Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-02481);
— by Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-02482);
— by Mr. Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-02483);
— by Mr. Rankin (Victoria), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-02484);
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-02485) and one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-02486);
— by Ms. Rempel (Calgary Nose Hill), one concerning the tax system (No. 421-02487);
— by Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe), one concerning the Canada Post Corporation (No. 421-02488);
— by Mr. Allison (Niagara West), two concerning discrimination (Nos. 421-02489 and 421-02490);
— by Mr. Virani (Parkdale—High Park), one concerning international development and aid (No. 421-02491);
— by Mr. Stewart (Burnaby South), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-02492) and one concerning health care services (No. 421-02493);
— by Mr. Richards (Banff—Airdrie), one concerning impaired driving (No. 421-02494);
— by Ms. Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona), one concerning health care services (No. 421-02495);
— by Mr. Van Loan (York—Simcoe), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-02496);
— by Mr. Donnelly (Port Moody—Coquitlam), one concerning international development and aid (No. 421-02497) and one concerning China (No. 421-02498);
— by Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock), one concerning nuclear and military exports (No. 421-02499), one concerning abortion (No. 421-02500) and three concerning sexual and violent content in the media (Nos. 421-02501 to 421-02503);
— by Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-02504);
— by Mr. Albrecht (Kitchener—Conestoga), one concerning discrimination (No. 421-02505);
— by Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), one concerning the regulation of food and drugs (No. 421-02506);
— by Ms. Leitch (Simcoe—Grey), one concerning discrimination (No. 421-02507);
— by Ms. Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-02508) and one concerning oil and gas (No. 421-02509);
— by Mr. Tilson (Dufferin—Caledon), one concerning refugees (No. 421-02510);
— by Mr. Eglinski (Yellowhead), one concerning discrimination (No. 421-02511);
— by Mr. Choquette (Drummond), one concerning health care services (No. 421-02512) and one concerning the tax system (No. 421-02513);
— by Mrs. Kusie (Calgary Midnapore), one concerning discrimination (No. 421-02514);
— by Mr. Cooper (St. Albert—Edmonton), one concerning China (No. 421-02515);
— by Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-02516).

Questions on the Order Paper

Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the answers to questions Q-1729, Q-1731, Q-1734, Q-1735, Q-1740, Q-1743, Q-1745, Q-1747 and Q-1749 on the Order Paper.


Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the supplementary return to the following question made into Order for Return:

Q-1685 — Mr. Hoback (Prince Albert) — With regard to reports that Facebook has not been registered as a lobbyist and, thus, its meetings with the government have not been reported on the Lobbying Commissioner’s website: (a) what are the details of all meetings between Facebook and the government, since November 4, 2015, including (i) date, (ii) location, (iii) list of attendees, (iv) purpose of meeting, (v) subject matter; and (b) what are the details of all briefing notes associated with the meetings in (a), including (i) date, (ii) title, (iii) summary, (iv) sender, (v) recipient, (vi) file number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1685-01.

Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into Orders for Return:

Q-1730 — Mr. Nuttall (Barrie—Springwater—Oro-Medonte) — With regard to the trip to India taken by the Prime Minister and other Ministers in February 2018, and excluding any invoices yet to be received: what are the details of all expenditures over $1,000 related to the trip, including (i) vendor, (ii) date, (iii) amount, (iv) description of goods or services provided, including quantity, if known, (v) file number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1730.

Q-1732 — Mr. Van Kesteren (Chatham-Kent—Leamington) — With regard to financial coding systems used by the government and broken down by department, agency, or other government entity: (a) what is the complete list of specific line object codes, ledger numbers, or similar financial tracking codes utilized by the government; (b) for each code in (a), what is the description of the item tracked by each code; and (c) for each code in (a), what is the total amount of revenue or expenditures associated with the code in the 2017-18 fiscal year? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1732.

Q-1733 — Mr. Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland) — With regard to counterfeit goods discovered and seized by the Canada Border Services Agency, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, or other relevant government entity, during the 2017-18 fiscal year: (a) what is the total value of the goods discovered, broken down by month; (b) for each seizure, what is the breakdown of goods by (i) type, (ii) brand, (iii) quantity, (iv) estimated value, (v) location or port of entry where the goods were discovered; (c) what percentage of the estimated total value of counterfeit imported goods are intercepted by the government; and (d) what is the government’s estimate for the value of counterfeit goods which enter Canada annually and avoid seizure by the government? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1733.

Q-1736 — Mr. Sweet (Flamborough—Glanbrook) — With regard to unescorted temporary absences for inmates in Correctional Service of Canada institutions, since November 4, 2015: (a) how many individuals serving an indeterminate sentence have been granted unescorted temporary absences; (b) for those individuals referred to in (a), what are the index offences for each individual who was granted an unescorted temporary absence; (c) for those individuals referred to in (a), what was the purpose and duration of each unescorted temporary absence; (d) for those individuals referred to in (a), how many individuals became unlawfully at large during the period of their unescorted temporary absence; (e) how many individuals serving life sentences have been granted unescorted temporary absences; (f) for those individuals referred to in (e), what are the index offences for each individual who was granted an unescorted temporary absence; (g) for those individuals referred to in (e), what was the purpose and duration of each unescorted temporary absence; (h) for those individuals referred to in (e), how many individuals became unlawfully at large during the period of their unescorted temporary absence; (i) how many individuals serving a sentence of 25 years or more have been granted unescorted temporary absences; (j) for those individuals referred to in (i), what are the index offences for each individual who was granted an unescorted temporary absence; (k) for those individuals referred to in (i), what was the purpose and duration of each unescorted temporary absence; (l) for those individuals referred to in (i), how many individuals became unlawfully at large during the period of their unescorted temporary absence; (m) how many individuals serving a sentence of ten years or more have been granted unescorted temporary absences; (n) for those individuals referred to in (m), what are the index offences for each individual who was granted an unescorted temporary absence; (o) for those individuals referred to in (m), what was the purpose and duration of each unescorted temporary absence; and (p) for those individuals referred to in (m), how many individuals became unlawfully at large during the period of their unescorted temporary absence? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1736.

Q-1737 — Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles) — With regard to illegal border crossings by individuals: (a) does the government believe it is illegal to cross the border at any place other than a port of entry; (b) does the matter of illegal border crossings fall under the jurisdiction of the RCMP or the Canada Border Services Agency; and (c) which agency or police force is responsible for apprehending individuals who have illegally crossed the border, broken down by geographic area? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1737.

Q-1738 — Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles) — With regard to individuals who have illegally crossed the border, since December 1, 2016, and are now seeking asylum: (a) what is the current wait time for receiving an Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) hearing; (b) how many such individuals have failed to appear at their scheduled IRB hearing; (c) how many such individuals have been deported; (d) what is the number of such individuals who have crossed the border, broken down by country of origin; (e) how many such individuals were deported for (i) national security reasons, (ii) terrorism charges, (iii) public safety reasons; (f) what is the breakdown of (e) by (i) individuals deported upon initial screening, (ii) individuals deported at a later date; (g) how many such individuals have been detained or incarcerated; and (h) how many such individuals are currently under a deportation order? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1738.

Q-1739 — Mrs. Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster) — With regard to expenditures at hotels by the Privy Council Office (PCO) and the Office of the Prime Minister (PMO): (a) what is the total of all such expenditures in (i) November 2017, (ii) December 2017, (iii) January 2018; (b) what are the details of all expenditures in (a), including (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) date of contract or invoice, (iv) description of goods or services, (v) file number, (vi) indication if expense was incurred by PCO or PMO, (vii) location; and (c) for any blocks or groups of hotel rooms purchased in regards to (a), what are the details of each such purchase, including (i) name of hotel, (ii) number of room nights purchased, (iii) nightly room rate, including any applicable taxes, (iv) total amount? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1739.

Q-1741 — Mr. McColeman (Brantford—Brant) — With regard to Veterans Affairs Canada offices and the government’s response to Question on the Order Paper number Q-1550: (a) what was the capital cost incurred in relation to the re-opening of the offices mentioned in Q-1550, broken down by office; and (b) what is the net rent cost being paid for each of the office properties? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1741.

Q-1742 — Mr. Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola) — With regard to recent tax changes by the United States of America that impose retroactive taxes on Canadian dual citizens who own Canadian corporations with retained earnings: (a) will the amount withdrawn by such individuals for the purpose of paying the new tax imposed by the US be also subject to Canadian income tax; and (b) what specific measures, if any, is the government implementing to ensure that such Canadians are not subject to double-taxation? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1742.

Q-1744 — Mr. Arnold (North Okanagan—Shuswap) — With regard to projects funded to date under the Atlantic Fisheries Fund: what are the details of all such projects, including (i) project name, (ii) description, (iii) location, (iv) recipient, (v) amount of federal contribution, (vi) riding, (vii) date of announcement? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1744.

Q-1746 — Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington) — With regard to information sharing between the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and the Canada Council for the Arts: is being designated a professional artist by the Canada Council for the Arts sufficient proof in order to prevent the CRA from declaring an individual to be a “hobby artist”? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1746.

Q-1748 — Ms. Harder (Lethbridge) — With regard to funding from the Department of Justice through the Victims Fund - Child Advocacy Centres: what are the details of all (a) announced grant funding, broken down by (i) name of the recipient, (ii) municipality and address of the recipient, (iii) date on which the funding was awarded, (iv) date on which the funding was received, (v) amount received; (b) unannounced grant funding, broken down by (i) name of the recipient, (ii) municipality of the recipient, (iii) date on which the funding was awarded, (iv) date on which the funding was received, (v) amount received; and (c) the amounts of the remaining unallocated funding? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1748.

Q-1750 — Ms. Harder (Lethbridge) — With regard to the economic empowerment and equality of females, for the years 2000 to 2018, broken down by calendar year, what are the: (a) hourly wages for full-time employment for females (18+); (b) hourly wages for full-time employment for males (18+); (c) comparison between the hourly wages for full-time employment between females and males (18+), expressed as a percentage; (d) hourly wages for part-time employment for females (18+); (e) hourly wages for part-time employment for males (18+); (f) comparison between the hourly wages for part-time employment between females and males (18+), expressed as a percentage; (g) percentage of females in full-time work; (h) percentage of males in full-time work; (i) percentage of females in part-time work; (j) percentage of males in part-time work; (k) percentage of females in self-employed work; (l) percentage of males in self-employed work; (m) percentage of females not participating in the formal workforce; (n) percentage of males not participating in the formal workforce; (o) total average pre-tax income for females in full-time work; (p) total average pre-tax income for males in full-time work; (q) total average after-tax income for females in full-time work; (r) total average after-tax income for males in full-time work; (s) average transfers from the Federal Government to females (18+); (t) average transfers from the government to males (18+); (u) average transfers from other levels of government to females (18+); (v) average transfers from other levels of government to males (18+); (w) percentage of females in poverty (LICO), broken down by (i) percentage of all females in poverty, (ii) percentage of females under the age of 18, (iii) percentage of females between 18 and 64, (iv) percentage of females 65+, (v) percentage of single females with no dependants, (vi) percentage of single females with dependants, (vii) percentage of married females, (viii) percentage of divorced and widowed females, (ix) percentage of females who are a visible minority, (x) percentage of females with a disability; (x) percentage of females in poverty (market-basket-measure), broken down by (i) percentage of all females in poverty, (ii) percentage of females under the age of 18, (iii) percentage of females between 18 and 64, (iv) percentage of females 65+, (v) percentage of single females with no dependants, (vi) percentage of single females with dependants, (vii) percentage of married females, (viii) percentage of divorced and widowed females, (ix) percentage of females who are a visible minority, (x) percentage of females with a disability;
(y) percentage of females in poverty (LIM), broken down by (i) percentage of all females in poverty, (ii) percentage of females under the age of 18, (iii) percentage of females between 18 and 64, (iv) percentage of females 65+, (v) percentage of single females with no dependants, (vi) percentage of single females with dependants, (vii) percentage of married females, (viii) percentage of divorced and widowed females, (ix) percentage of females who are a visible minority, (x) percentage of females with a disability; (z) percentage of businesses owned by females, broken down by (i) total number of businesses owned by females, (ii) total number of small businesses owned by females, (iii) total number of medium-sized businesses owned by females, (iv) total number of large businesses owned by females; (aa) percentage of females on the corporate boards of private businesses (federally and provincially regulated businesses); (bb) percentage of females on boards appointed by the Governor in Council; (cc) representation of females, as a percentage, in the civil service (employed in the civil service), broken down by (i) percentage at the Deputy Minister level, (ii) percentage at the executive level, (iii) percentage at the management level, (iv) percentage at the employee level; (dd) percentage of females in the diplomatic core, (i) percentage of ambassadors and high-commissioners, (ii) percentage of diplomatic postings, (iii) percentage of employees in Canadian embassies and high-commissions abroad? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1750.

Q-1751 — Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — With regard to the costs in legal fees, mediation and compensation for appeals and out of court settlements involving veterans, paid by the government, since 2008: (a) how many legal cases involving veterans were brought to court since 2008, broken down by (i) year, (ii) costs associated with expenses and other fees paid by the government, (iii) number of cases before the courts involving veterans, (iv) types of cases before the courts, (v) length of legal proceedings, in days, months or years; (b) how many legal cases involving veterans were settled out of court since 2008, broken down by (i) year, (ii) number of out of court settlements, (iii) amounts of out of court settlements and agreements, (iv) types of proceedings, (v) other expenses or fees associated with these settlements, (vi) length of talks between parties to reach an agreement in days, months or years; (c) since 2008, how many cases were ruled in favour of the government against veterans, broken down by (i) year, (ii) types of cases won by the government, (iii) total of expenses and legal fees paid, (iv) length of legal proceedings in days, months or year; (d) since 2008, how many cases, ruled in favour of the government against veterans, were appealed, broken down by (i) year, (ii) type of cases, (iii) court decision, (iv) all expenses and fees paid by the government; (e) since 2008, how many cases were ruled in favour of veterans against the government, broken down by (i) year, (ii) types of cases won by veterans, (iii) amounts won and reimbursed to veterans; (f) since 2008, how many cases ruled in favour of veterans against the government were appealed by the government, broken down by (i) year, (ii) types of cases, (iii) court decision, (iv) all expenses and fees paid by the government, (v) length of legal proceedings in days, months or years; (g) what amounts have veterans received in legal aid, since 2008, in legal proceedings involving veterans and the government, broken down by (i) year, (ii) legal aid amounts, (iii) types of cases heard; (h) what fees and expenses were paid by the government, since 2008, for mediation involving veterans or groups of veterans, broken down by (i) year, (ii) number of cases heard by a mediator, (iii) amount of mediation expenses paid by the government, (iv) types of cases heard by a mediator, (v) types of agreements reached between parties, namely the government and the veterans; and (i) since 2008, which law or mediation firms were hired by the government, broken down by (i) year, (ii) name of firms, (iii) amounts paid to each firm? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1751.
Statement by the Speaker

Pursuant to Standing Order 69.1, the Speaker divided the question with respect to the third reading of Bill C-59, An Act respecting national security matters, as follows:

Parts 1 to 5, part 9, clauses 169 to 172, the title and the preamble;

Part 6 and clause 173; and

Parts 7 and 8.

Government Orders

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change), seconded by Mr. Sohi (Minister of Infrastructure and Communities), — That Bill C-69, An Act to enact the Impact Assessment Act and the Canadian Energy Regulator Act, to amend the Navigation Protection Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, be now read a third time and do pass;

And of the motion of Mrs. McCrimmon (Kanata—Carleton), seconded by Mr. Lamoureux (Winnipeg North), — That this question be now put.

The debate continued.

At 4:40 p.m., pursuant to Order made Wednesday, June 6, 2018, under the provisions of Standing Order 78(3), the Speaker interrupted the proceedings.

The question was put on the motion and, pursuant to Order made Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the recorded division was deferred until Tuesday, June 19, 2018, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.


The Order was read for the third reading of Bill C-59, An Act respecting national security matters.

Mr. Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness), seconded by Mr. Champagne (Minister of International Trade), moved, — That the Bill be now read a third time and do pass.

Debate arose thereon.

Pursuant to Standing Order 69.1(1), the question was put on Parts 1 to 5, part 9, clauses 169 to 172, the title and the preamble, and the recorded division was deferred.

Pursuant to Standing Order 69.1(1), the question was put on Part 6 and clause 173, and the recorded division was deferred.

Pursuant to Standing Order 69.1(1), the question was put on Parts 7 and 8, and the recorded division was deferred.

Pursuant to Order made Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the recorded divisions were further deferred until Tuesday, June 19, 2018, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.


The Order was read for the consideration at report stage of Bill C-71, An Act to amend certain Acts and Regulations in relation to firearms, as reported by the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security with amendments.

Pursuant to Standing Order 76.1(5), the Speaker selected and grouped for debate the following motions:

Group No. 1 — Motions Nos. 1 to 28.

Group No. 1

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 1, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 1.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 2, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 3.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 3, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 4.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 4, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 5.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 5, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 6.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 6, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 7.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 7, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 8.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 8, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 9.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 9, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 10.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 10, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 11.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 11, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 12.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 12, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 13.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 13, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 14.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 14, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 15.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 15, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 16.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 16, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 17.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 17, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 18.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 18, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 19.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 19, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 20.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 20, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 21.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 21, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 23.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 22, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 24.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 23, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 25.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 24, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 26.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 25, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 27.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 26, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 28.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 27, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 29.

Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles), seconded by Mr. Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound), moved Motion No. 28, — That Bill C-71 be amended by deleting Clause 30.

Debate arose on the motions in Group No. 1.

Notices of Motions

Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) gave notice of the intention to move a motion at the next sitting of the House, pursuant to Standing Order 78(3), for the purpose of allotting a specified number of days or hours for the consideration and disposal of the report stage and third reading stage of Bill C-71, An Act to amend certain Acts and Regulations in relation to firearms.

Government Orders

The House resumed consideration at report stage of Bill C-71, An Act to amend certain Acts and Regulations in relation to firearms, as reported by the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security with amendments;

And of the motions in Group No. 1 (Motions Nos. 1 to 28).

The debate continued on the motions in Group No. 1.

Messages from the Senate

A message was received from the Senate as follows:

— ORDERED: That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that House that the Senate has passed Bill C-65, An Act to amend the Canada Labour Code (harassment and violence), the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act and the Budget Implementation Act, 2017, No. 1, with the following amendments:
1. Clause 0.1, page 1: Replace line 7 with the following:
“harassment and violence includes any action, conduct or”.
2. Clause 1, page 1: Replace lines 15 to 19 with the following:
“122.1 The purpose of this Part is to
(a) prevent accidents, occurrences of harassment and violence and physical or psychological injuries and illnesses arising out of, linked with or occurring in the course of employment to which this part applies;
(b) recognize that every employee has the right to employment that is free from harassment and violence; and
(c) advance gender equality, address issues of racism and ensure that the rights of women workers, including those who face intersectional forms of discrimination, are respected, protected and fulfilled.”.
3. New clause 2.1, page 2: Add the following after line 6:
“2.1 The Act is amended by adding the following after section 123:
123.1 For greater certainty, nothing in this Part shall be construed so as to abrogate or derogate from the rights provided for under the Canadian Human Rights Act.”.
4. Clause 3, page 3: Add the following after line 8:
“(z.163) ensure that the work place is free from harassment and violence;
(z.164) ensure that the person designated by the employer to receive complaints relating to occurrences of harassment and violence has knowledge, training and experience in issues relating to harassment and violence and has knowledge of relevant legislation;”.
5. Clause 5, pages 4 and 5:
(a) On page 4, add the following after line 25:
“(2.1) Subsection 127.1(4) of the Act is replaced by the following:
(4) The persons who investigate the complaint shall inform the employee and the employer in writing, in the form and manner prescribed if any is prescribed, of the results of the investigation and provide them with a copy of the investigation report.”; and
(b) on page 5, replace line 11 with the following:
“(b) the matter is otherwise an abuse of process.”.
6. Clause 11.1, pages 7 and 8:
(a) On page 7, replace line 37 with the following:
“139.1 (1) The Minister shall prepare and publish an annual”; and
(b) on page 8, add the following after line 5:
“(2) The statistical data contained in the report shall include information that is categorized according to prohibited grounds of discrimination under the Canadian Human Rights Act.”.
7. Clause 21, pages 13 and 16:
(a) On page 13, add the following after line 35:
“(3) For greater certainty, subject to section 2, nothing in this Part shall be construed so as to abrogate or derogate from the rights provided for under the Canadian Human Rights Act.”; and
(b) on page 16,
(i) replace line 1 with the following:
“88.7 (1) The Board shall, as soon as possible after the end of”, and
(ii) add the following after line 10:
“(2) The report must contain statistical data relating to harassment and violence in work places to which this Part applies, including information that is categorized according to prohibited grounds of discrimination under the Canadian Human Rights Act. The report shall not contain any information that is likely to reveal the identity of a person who was involved in an occurrence of harassment and violence.”.
Returns and Reports Deposited with the Clerk of the House

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(1), papers deposited with the Clerk of the House were laid upon the Table as follows:

— by the Speaker — Minutes of Proceedings of the Board of Internal Economy of the House of Commons for May 24, 2018, pursuant to Standing Order 148(1). — Sessional Paper No. 8527-421-38.
— by Mr. Brison (President of the Treasury Board) — Report of the President of the Treasury Board on Official Languages in federal institutions for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2017, pursuant to the Official Languages Act, R.S. 1985, c. 31 (4th Supp.), s. 48. — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-570-03. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Official Languages)
— by Mr. Hussen (Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship) — Proposed Regulations Amending the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations, pursuant to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, S.C. 2001, c. 27, sbs. 5(2). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-790-13. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration)
Midnight
Adjournment Proceedings

At midnight, pursuant to Standing Order 38(1), the question “That this House do now adjourn” was deemed to have been proposed.

After debate, the question was deemed to have been adopted.

Accordingly, at 12:09 a.m., the Speaker adjourned the House until later today, at 10:00 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 24(1).