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42nd PARLIAMENT, 1st SESSION

Journals

No. 182

Monday, May 29, 2017

11:00 a.m.



Prayer
Private Members' Business

At 11:00 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 30(6), the House proceeded to the consideration of Private Members' Business.

Mr. Shields (Bow River), seconded by Mr. Sopuck (Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa), moved, — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should recognize that the ongoing contribution of ranchers and farmers as stewards of the land and conservationists is part of our history, proudly shared by all Canadians, and should consider establishing policies which would support and encourage the development of private farm and ranch land conservation and restoration projects. (Private Members' Business M-108)

Debate arose thereon.

Pursuant to Standing Order 93(1), the Order was dropped to the bottom of the order of precedence on the Order Paper.

Government Orders

Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons), seconded by Mr. Hussen (Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship), moved, — That, notwithstanding any Standing Order or usual practice of the House, commencing upon the adoption of this Order and concluding on Friday, June 23, 2017:

(a) on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, the ordinary hour of daily adjournment shall be 12:00 a.m., except that it shall be 10:00 p.m. on a day when a debate, pursuant to Standing Order 52 or 53.1, is to take place;
(b) subject to paragraph (e), when a recorded division is demanded in respect of a debatable motion, including any division arising as a consequence of the application of Standing Order 61(2) or Standing Order 78, but not including any division in relation to the Business of Supply or arising as a consequence of an order made pursuant to Standing Order 57, (i) before 2:00 p.m. on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, it shall stand deferred until the conclusion of oral questions at that day’s sitting, or (ii) after 2:00 p.m. on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, or at any time on a Friday, it shall stand deferred until the conclusion of oral questions at the next sitting day that is not a Friday;
(c) notwithstanding Standing Order 45(6) and paragraph (b) of this Order, no recorded division requested after 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, June 22, 2017, or at any time on Friday, June 23, 2017, shall be deferred, except for any recorded division which, under the Standing Orders, would be deferred to immediately before the time provided for Private Members’ Business on Wednesday, September 20, 2017;
(d) the time provided for Government Orders shall not be extended pursuant to Standing Order 45(7.1) or Standing Order 67.1(2);
(e) when a recorded division, which would have ordinarily been deemed deferred to immediately before the time provided for Private Members’ Business on a Wednesday governed by this Order, is demanded, the said division is deemed to have been deferred until the conclusion of oral questions on the same Wednesday;
(f) any recorded division which, at the time of the adoption of this Order, stands deferred to immediately before the time provided for Private Members’ Business on the Wednesday immediately following the adoption of this Order shall be deemed to stand deferred to the conclusion of oral questions on the same Wednesday;
(g) a recorded division demanded in respect of a motion to concur in a government bill at the report stage pursuant to Standing Order 76.1(9), where the bill has neither been amended nor debated at the report stage, shall be deferred in the manner prescribed by paragraph (b);
(h) for greater certainty, this Order shall not limit the application of Standing Order 45(7);
(i) no dilatory motion may be proposed after 6:30 p.m.;
(j) notwithstanding Standing Orders 81(16)(b) and (c) and 81(18)(c), proceedings on any opposition motion shall conclude no later than 5:30 p.m. on the sitting day that is designated for that purpose, except on a Monday when they shall conclude at 6:30 p.m. or on a Friday when they shall conclude at 1:30 p.m.; and
(k) when debate on a motion for the concurrence in a report from a standing, standing joint or special committee is adjourned or interrupted, the debate shall again be considered on a day designated by the government, after consultation with the House Leaders of the other parties, but in any case not later than the twentieth sitting day after the interruption. (Government Business No. 14)

Debate arose thereon.

Ms. Bergen (Portage—Lisgar), seconded by Mr. Kent (Thornhill), moved the following amendment, — That the motion be amended:

(a) by adding to paragraph (b) the following: “and if a recorded division is demanded in respect of a motion moved pursuant to Standing Order 57 in relation to any motion dealing with amendments to the Standing Orders or changes to the practices of the House, it shall stand deferred to December 5, 2017, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions;”; and
(b) by deleting all the words in paragraph (j).

Debate arose thereon.

Statements By Members

Pursuant to Standing Order 31, Members made statements.

Oral Questions

Pursuant to Standing Order 30(5), the House proceeded to Oral Questions.

Daily Routine Of Business

Tabling of Documents
Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Ms. Wilson-Raybould (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada) laid upon the Table, — Document entitled "Legislative Background: An Act respecting cannabis and to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Criminal Code and other Acts (Bill C-45)". — Sessional Paper No. 8525-421-33.

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:

— Nos. 421-01258 and 421-01259 concerning trucking and truckers. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-151-01;
— No. 421-01262 concerning veterans' affairs. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-111-02;
— No. 421-01263 concerning the Canada Pension Plan. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-152-01;
— Nos. 421-01264 and 421-01285 concerning tobacco. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-153-01;
— Nos. 421-01266, 421-01282, 421-01296, 421-01302 and 421-01371 concerning genetic engineering. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-26-11;
— Nos. 421-01267, 421-01269, 421-01317 and 421-01318 concerning the electoral system. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-11-20;
— No. 421-01268 concerning the pension system. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-98-02;
— Nos. 421-01270 and 421-01304 concerning discrimination. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-32-02;
— No. 421-01271 concerning health care services. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-31-20;
— Nos. 421-01272, 421-01280, 421-01291, 421-01295, 421-01312, 421-01335 and 421-01357 concerning the tax system. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-1-13;
— No. 421-01273 concerning childhood cancer. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-154-01;
— No. 421-01276 concerning navigable waters. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-101-05;
— No. 421-01279 concerning correctional facilities. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-155-01;
— No. 421-01281 concerning assisted suicide. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-9-14;
— No. 421-01292 concerning organ donation. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-134-05;
— No. 421-01293 concerning species at risk. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-50-04;
— Nos. 421-01319 and 421-01369 concerning the protection of the environment. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-3-19;
— No. 421-01349 concerning rail transportation. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-10-14.

Presenting Reports from Interparliamentary Delegations





Presenting Reports from Committees

Mr. Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan), from the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates, presented the Seventh Report of the Committee (Main Estimates 2017-18: Vote 1 under Canada Post Corporation, Vote 1 under Canada School of Public Service, Vote 1 under Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat, Vote 1 under Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board, Votes 1 and 5 under Department of Public Works and Government Services, Vote 1 under Office of the Governor General's Secretary, Vote 1 under Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner, Vote 1 under Privy Council Office, Vote 1 under Public Service Commission, Vote 1 under Senate, Votes 1 and 5 under Shared Services Canada and Votes 1, 5, 10, 20, 25, 30 and 33 under Treasury Board Secretariat). — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-219.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 85, 86 and 88) was tabled.


Mr. Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge), from the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, presented the Fifth Report of the Committee, (Main Estimates 2017-18: Votes 1 and 5 under Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Votes 1 and 5 under Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, Votes 1, 5 and 10 under Canadian Space Agency, Vote 1 under Canadian Tourism Commission, Vote 1 under Copyright Board, Votes 1, 5, 10, L15 and L20 under Department of Industry, Votes 1 and 5 under Department of Western Economic Diversification, Votes 1 and 5 under Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, Votes 1 and 5 under Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario, Votes 1, 5 and 10 under National Research Council of Canada, Votes 1 and 5 under Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Votes 1 and 5 under Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Vote 1 under Standards Council of Canada and Vote 1 under Statistics Canada). — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-220.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 61 and 62) was tabled.


Ms. Mihychuk (Kildonan—St. Paul), from the Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs, presented the Sixth Report of the Committee, "Default Prevention and Management 2017". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-221.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 48 to 53 and 56 to 58) was tabled.


First Reading of Senate Public Bills

Pursuant to Standing Order 69(2), on motion of Mr. Levitt (York Centre), seconded by Mr. Kent (Thornhill), Bill S-232, An Act respecting Canadian Jewish Heritage Month, was read the first time and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


Presenting Petitions

Pursuant to Standing Order 36, petitions certified by the Clerk of Petitions were presented as follows:

— by Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan), one concerning the tax system (No. 421-01378);
— by Mr. Paradis (Brome—Missisquoi), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-01379);
— by Mr. Stewart (Burnaby South), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-01380);
— by Mr. Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville), five concerning road transportation (Nos. 421-01381 to 421-01385);
— by Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe), one concerning health care services (No. 421-01386);
— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning genetic engineering (No. 421-01387) and one concerning China (No. 421-01388);
— by Mr. Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman), one concerning international sanctions (No. 421-01389).

Questions on the Order Paper

Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the revised answer to question Q-954 and answers to questions Q-958 to Q-960, Q-966 to Q-971, Q-973 to Q-976, Q-980, Q-982 and Q-985 on the Order Paper.


Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into Orders for Return:

Q-961 — Mr. Saroya (Markham—Unionville) — With regard to the choice of July 1, 2018, as the target date for the legalization of marijuana in Canada: (a) why was that specific date chosen; and (b) does the government have any plans in place to ensure that the Canada Day celebrations on Parliament Hill on July 1, 2018, are not impacted as a result of the legalization of marijuana and, if so, what are the details of any such plan? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-961.

Q-962 — Mr. Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly) — With regard to the high-risk immigration-related detention by Canada Border Services Agency in provincial jails: (a) how many high-risk immigration-related detainees are currently detained in each province; (b) of the total number of detainees in (a), (i) what is the gender ratio, (ii) how many are under 21 years old, (iii) how many are over 65 years old; (c) how many high-risk immigration-related detentions have been prolonged, since October 2015, in the past (i) six months, (ii) one year, (iii) one year and six months; (d) what has the government done with respect to outsourcing of housing for high-risk immigration detainees to provincial jails, since 2000, and related to (i) annual cost, (ii) cost by provinces; and (e) what is the percentage premium, on top of the per-capita costs associated with housing those detainees, paid to each province? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-962.

Q-963 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to the FedNor, for each fiscal year from 2009-10 to 2017-18: (a) what is the organization’s total approved budget; (b) with respect to the budget in (a), how much was actually spent; (c) with respect to the budget in (a), how much lapsed funding was eligible to be carried over to future years; (d) how much was allocated to the Northern Ontario Development Program; (e) how much was actually spent on the Northern Ontario Development Program; (f) how much was allocated to the Community Futures Program; (g) how much was actually spent on the Community Futures Program; and (h) what were the Full Time Equivalent staffing levels of the organization? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-963.

Q-964 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) and the Independent Assessment Process (IAP): (a) following Justice Perrell’s ruling in January 2014 requiring the government to disclose additional documentation that includes police investigations, transcripts of criminal proceedings, and transcripts of civil proceedings (i) what is the number and full list of Narratives that were modified, (ii) what is the number and full list of person of interest reports that were modified, (iii) what is the number of IAP claims, broken down by school, that had been adjudicated under the previous unmodified narratives and person of interest reports, (iv) what is the number of cases, broken down by school, that were re-adjudicated since the narratives and person of interest reports were modified, (v) what steps were taken by federal officials, for each Indian Residential Schools (IRS) where the narrative and Persons of Interest (POI) reports changed, to determine if individual IAP claims had been denied that might otherwise be supported on this new evidence, (vi) what is the number of survivors or his/her claimant counsel who were contacted or notified of the modifications to the narratives or person of interest reports; (b) regarding civil actions related to Indian Residential Schools predating the IRSSA (i) what is the number of civil cases the government is aware of, (ii) what is the number of civil cases the government was involved in, (iii) what is the number of civil cases the government has court transcripts or documentation of, (iv) what is the number of civil cases that were settled, (v) what is the number of civil cases the government has placed any kind of privilege over the documents (civil pleadings and transcripts of examinations for discovery) related to the case, (vi) what is the number of civil cases the government has not provided the documentation (civil pleadings and transcripts of examinations for discovery) to the IAP or to the National Center for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR), (vii) what is the full list of reasons the government has failed to provide this documentation, (viii) were there any terms under which any plaintiff in those civil actions were not allowed to provide his/her civil pleading and/or the transcript of his/her examination for discovery to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, (ix) if the settlement agreement was signed before the IRSSA, what steps have been taken by federal officials to permit each plaintiff to file his/her civil pleadings and transcripts of examinations for discovery with the NCTR, (x) if no steps have been taken, what steps are currently being taken, (xi) if steps are not being taken, is direction from the court being sought by the Attorney General, (xii) which federal officials have possession of the transcripts of examinations for discovery, (xiii) what is going to be done with those transcripts when the IRSSA is completed if directions have not been sought from the Court, (xiv) will the Government fund the plaintiff lawyers to communicate with each plaintiff or his/her Estate on this question of the transcripts being filed with the NCTR, (xv) are the Churches in any way constraining the Attorney General of Canada from ensuring that the stories of IRS survivors who were plaintiffs in civil actions, are allowed to be filed with the NCTR; (c) regarding conversation, consultations, or discussions between defendants in the IRSSA such as the government and any church (i) have any conversations, consultations, or discussions occurred over any individual cases in the IAP, (ii) if they occur how common are they, (iii) if they occur what are the matters that are discussed, (iv) if they occur, does this happen when allegations are raised about any current or previous members of either defendant during the IAP hearings; (d) regarding documentation of the IAP (i) what is the number of IAP decisions that have been redacted, (ii) what is the number of IAP transcripts that have been created, (iii) what is the number of IAP transcripts that have been redacted to remove the names of alleged perpetrators; and (e) regarding the IRSSA database (i) what is the number of school narratives in this database, (ii) what is the number of school narratives in this database that have been redacted to remove personal information? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-964.

Q-965 — Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — With regard to crime statistics for the possession of marijuana since October 20, 2015: (a) how many adults over the age of 25 were (i) arrested, (ii) charged, (iii) convicted for possession of marijuana; and (b) how many youth under the age of 25 were (i) arrested, (ii) charged, (iii) convicted for possession of marijuana? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-965.

Q-972 — Mr. Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola) — With regard to counterfeit goods discovered by the Canada Border Services Agency, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, or other relevant government entity, since December, 2015: (a) what is the value of the goods discovered, broken down by month; and (b) what is the breakdown of goods by (i) type, (ii) brand, (iii) country of origin, (iv) location or port of entry where the goods were discovered? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-972.

Q-977 — Mr. Anderson (Cypress Hills—Grasslands) — With regard to materials prepared for ministers since December 6, 2016: for every briefing document, memorandum or docket prepared, what is the (i) date, (ii) title or subject matter, (iii) department's internal tracking number, (iv) recipient? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-977.

Q-978 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to Indigenous Affairs and First Nations Inuit Health Branch: (a) with respect to First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada and Assembly of First Nations v. Attorney General of Canada (representing the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada), Canadian Human Rights Tribunal File No. T134017008, what are the total legal costs incurred by the government in this matter since January 25, 2016; (b) with respect to Budget 2017, (i) how much of the 50 million dollars announced for the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy program is new funding, how much of it is reallocations, and where are the reallocations coming from, (ii) how much of the money to reduce employment barriers for First Nations youth is from unspent funding in this program area, (iii) how much of the money allocated to Indigenous tourism is new money or just a reallocation from the broader spending on attracting international tourists, (iv) what percentage of the backlog of post-secondary students will be addressed by the additional funding in Post-Secondary Support Program and how many students will still remain on the backlog, (v) what are the details of the 4 billion dollar investment for infrastructure, broken down by year for the last ten years, and by program type, (vi) what is the number of homes that will be built with the 300 million dollars for Northern housing broken down by year, as well as by new homes, lots, and renovations, (vii) what are the details of the funding for each individual area, broken down by year, by chronic and infectious diseases, by maternal and child health, by primary care, by mental wellness, by home and palliative care, by non-insured health benefits, and by drug strategy; (c) if the department cannot provide the information requested in (b)(v), (i) is it because there is currently no identified plan for these investments and where they will flow, (ii) then how was this investment figure calculated; and (d) with respect to the First Nations Inuit Health Branch program, what is the most current rate of denials for each level of appeals, broken down by type? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-978.

Q-979 — Mr. MacKenzie (Oxford) — With regard to the ongoing renovations at 24 Sussex Drive: (a) what is the current status of the renovations; (b) what is the expected completion date; (c) what are the expected costs between 2016 and the completion date; and (d) what are the details of any contracts issued since January 1, 2016, related to the renovations including the (i) vendor name, (ii) date, (iii) amount, (iv) description of goods or services provided, (v) file number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-979.

Q-981 — Mr. Stewart (Burnaby South) — With regard to the Canada Summer Jobs Program in 2016 and 2017: (a) how many jobs were approved in each riding for each of the aforementioned years; and (b) how much money was awarded to each riding to support the jobs in (a), for each of the aforementioned years? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-981.

Q-983 — Mr. Van Kesteren (Chatham-Kent—Leamington) — With regard to amounts paid by the government to the Aga Khan in relation to the trip taken to the Bahamas by the Prime Minister in December 2016 and January 2017: (a) what was the total amount paid out to the Aga Khan in (i) per diems, (ii) other payments; (b) how many employees per diems were paid to the Aga Khan; (c) did the Aga Khan submit invoices to the government in relation to the trip; and (d) if the answer in (c) is affirmative, what are the details, including the (i) date of invoice, (ii) amount of invoice, (iii) amount paid by the government, (iv) date of payment, (v) description of goods or service provided? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-983.

Q-984 — Mr. Allison (Niagara West) — With regard to the Prime Ministerial delegation to Vimy, France, in April 2017: (a) who were the members of the delegation; and (b) how were the delegation members chosen? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-984.
Government Orders

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. Wilson-Raybould (Minister of Justice), seconded by Mr. Sohi (Minister of Infrastructure and Communities), — That Bill C-46, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (offences relating to conveyances) and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

The debate continued.

Notices of Motions

Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) gave notice of intention to move at the next sitting of the House, pursuant to Standing Order 57, that, in relation to the consideration of Government Business No. 14, the debate not be further adjourned.

Government Orders

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. Wilson-Raybould (Minister of Justice), seconded by Mr. Sohi (Minister of Infrastructure and Communities), — That Bill C-46, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (offences relating to conveyances) and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

The debate continued.

Returns and Reports Deposited with the Acting Clerk of the House

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(1), a paper deposited with the Acting Clerk of the House was laid upon the Table as follows:

— by Mr. Garneau (Minister of Transport) — Interim Order No. 6 Respecting the Use of Model Aircraft (81100-3-64-6), dated May 19, 2017, pursuant to the Aeronautics Act, R.S. 1985, c. A-2, sbs. 6.41(5) and (6). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-926-08. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities)
Adjournment Proceedings

At 6:30 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 38(1), the question “That this House do now adjourn” was deemed to have been proposed.

After debate, pursuant to Standing Order 81(4)(a), the question was deemed to have been withdrawn.

Government Orders

Business of Supply

At 6:51 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 81(4)(a), the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole for the consideration of all Votes under Department of National Defence in the Main Estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2018.

At 10:51 p.m., the Committee rose.

Pursuant to Standing Order 81(4)(a), the considered Votes were deemed reported.

Adjournment

Accordingly, at 10:53 p.m., the Speaker adjourned the House until tomorrow at 10:00 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 24(1).