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A Sense of Place and of Purpose:
Canada's House of Commons

PERIOD OF THIS REPORT:

April 1, 2007-March 31, 2008

TOTAL NUMBER OF
SITTING DAYS:

112 days

From the Peace Tower carillon that rings out over the nation's capital, to the scores of ornate stone carvings and gargoyles that keep watch from their berths, Canada's House of Commons is a place deeply rooted in symbols and tradition that express a profound sense of both place and purpose.

Visitors from around the world come to this Canadian landmark and admire how it is a building formed by a union of ideas. They see it in the distinctive architecture: the thin lancet windows and soaring spires; the smooth copper-clad rooftops; and the rough-carved stonemasonry. Even its location holds a special meaning: a meeting place of three rivers, perched on a rocky point overlooking fast-moving water, wooded land and urban landscapes, within sight of sacred meeting grounds that the Algonquin peoples have always called Asinabka, or "Place of Glare Rock."

All are witness to the purpose of this place. Canada's House of Commons is where Canadian values-democracy, justice, peace and integrity-are celebrated and defended. It is a place where national ideas take shape.

OUTREACH PROFILE

Office of the Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel

Each year, the Office of the Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel provides an articling position to a law student graduating in civil law or common law from a Canadian university. The Office of the Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel is also involved in other outreach projects, such as welcoming co-op students from Canadian law schools, and organizing conferences for Members on law and parliamentary-related matters.

It is a place that is a legacy of our nation's founders and one that thrives and flourishes today by virtue of the support of the Canadian people. From all points on the compass, Members of Parliament come to this place and give voice to the hopes, ideas and concerns of the citizens they represent. They engage each other in debate, share ideas and make decisions that can affect the lives of millions. And in doing so, they exercise the democratic traditions that all citizens of this nation hold dear.

This 2008 edition of the House of Commons Report to Canadians showcases the accomplishments of Members of Parliament and the House Administration that supports them. It highlights the Administration's goals for the upcoming fiscal year and provides up-to-date information on membership in the House of Commons and the activities of Members.