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Footnotes

1 F.G. Todd, Report ... to the Ottawa Improvement Commission, p. 1.

2 The accommodation of Canadian legislatures was provisional until 1867. The first sitting of the Parliament of the Province of Canada was held in temporary quarters in Kingston on June 14, 1841. Subsequently, it met in Montreal, Quebec City and Toronto until Queen Victoria selected Ottawa as the permanent seat of the government.

3 Offices for the Prime Minister and the Governor General were located in the Departmental Buildings. The Prime Minister always held another portfolio. His office was located with that department. See R.A.J. Phillips, The East Block of the Parliament Buildings of Canada, p. 46.

4 When the British lost their House of Commons Chamber in the bombing raids of the Second World War, they insisted on a reproduction of the essential features of the mid-19th century space, arguing that 1852 dimensions and appointments had become inseparable from the British political tradition.

5 Manitoba, British Columbia and Prince Edward Island were admitted into Confederation in the 1870s.

6 The Supreme Court was moved to a building (previously used for government workshops) west of the West Block.

7 C.T. Goodsell, "The Architecture of Parliaments: Legislative Houses and Political Culture," British Journal of Political Science 18 (July 1998), p. 288.

8 The new design emphasized a disciplined monumentality and a "correct" use of Gothic motif as opposed to the creative eclecticism that distinguished the original building. The landscape had a more ordered treatment which contrasted with the original picturesque approach.

9 The buildings were erected despite the protests of the architectural community who felt the style was outmoded.

10 Federal Plan Commission, Report of the Federal Plan Commission, p. 90.

11 Edward VI designated St. Stephens Chapel in 1550 as the first permanent meeting space for the House of Commons. The Members sat in facing rows of choir stalls, the Speaker was given a chair on the altar platform, a table was set between the stalls for the Clerk of the House and the antechamber behind the screen became the lobby. Although modelled on the British House, the first Centre Block Chamber had slightly different proportions, with more width than depth. J. Smith and Associates, Architects, House of Commons Chamber, Centre Block, Parliament Hill: Proposed Modifications, 1996.

12 J. Smith and Associates, Architects, House of Commons Chamber, Centre Block, Parliament Hill: Proposed Modifications, 1996.

13 C.T. Goodsell, "The Architecture of Parliaments: Legislative Houses and Political Culture," British Journal of Political Science 18 (July 1998), p. 287.

14 J. Page, Letter, to the Secretary of Public Works, Ottawa, February 20, 1867, National Archives, RG11, B1(a), v.415, Subject 1026.

15 J.D. Livermore, "A History of Parliamentary Accommodation in Canada, 1841–1974," in Canada, Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, Report of the Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, p. 77.

16 H.I. Smith, "A Museum Becomes the Seat of Government," Scientific American Supplement (April 8, 1916).

17 Canada, Department of Public Works, Victoria Museum, Ottawa: Plan of the House of Commons Showing Seating, 1916, National Archives, RG11, v. 2649, f.1551–44.

18 By 2004 there will be 310 Members, by 2014, 316 Members, and by 2024, 322 Members. Calculations are based on sections 51 and 51A of the Constitution Act, 1867. J.-P. Kingsley, Letter, to the Director General of Parliamentary Precinct, PWGSC, November 6, 1998.

19 Two feasible solutions would double the current space: enlarging the Lobby into the adjacent courtyard, or using the space immediately below the Lobby (providing a private staircase).

20 This includes rooms 112-N, 253-D and 356-S (the latter used by the Senate). Other rooms on the fourth floor have been subdivided into offices and room 340-S is now used by the Privy Council.

21 Canada, Department of Public Works, West Block Plans/Plans de l’Immeuble de l’Ouest, second and third floor, 1963.

22 Canada, Parliament, House of Commons, Task Force on the Handling and Transit of Goods and Assets, Room Report — May 1997: The Nightmare before Christmas: Getting a Room on Parliament Hill, p. 3.

23 Canada, Parliament, House of Commons, Standing Committee on Procedure and Organization, Journals, May 28, 1970, p. 892.

24 Canada, Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, chaired by The Honourable D. C. Abbott, Report of the Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, p. 9. [Hereafter referred to as the Abbott Report.]

25 In 1993, the Liaison Committee on Committee Effectiveness reported a steady increase in the number of subcommittees.

26 Since 1984, as a result of the recommendation of the Lefebvre Committee, committees can initiate their own studies.

27 J. Maingot, Parliamentary Privilege in Canada, p. 12.

28 Canada, Parliament, House of Commons, Task Force on the Handling and Transit of Goods and Assets, Room Report — May 1997: The Nightmare before Christmas: Getting a Room on Parliament Hill, pp. 8-9

29 Ibid., pp. 9-10

30 Standing Order 115(2) states that "during periods coinciding with the hours of sittings of the House, priority shall be given to the meetings of committees considering legislation or Estimates over meetings of committees considering other matters."

31 By 2004 there will be 310 Members by 2014, 316 Members and by 2024, 322 Members. Calculations are based on sections 51 and 51A of the Constitution Act, 1867. J.-P. Kingsley, Letter, to the Director General of Parliamentary Precinct, PWGSC, November 6, 1998.

32 Based on current usage of 23 rooms, growing to 24 by the end of the renovation period.

33 Committee rooms are difficult and costly to integrate into heritage buildings that do not have large open rooms without compromising committee requirements or structural integrity and heritage character of existing buildings.

34 Increasingly, arrangements must be made with the Senate or the Privy Council to use rooms under their jurisdiction when there is an acute shortage of House of Commons rooms.

35 Based on direction of the House of Commons Board of Internal Economy (BOIE) and Liaison Committee.

36 The BOIE’s Accommodation Subcommittee advised PWGSC’s officials to locate Members of Parliament on the north side of Wellington Street at a meeting on June 12, 1992.

37 Members of Parliament, witnesses and the visiting public spend a great deal of time in these spaces. The design of spaces must take advantage of views and provide a quality environment in which work and social events can take place.

38 The existing buildings in the Parliamentary Precinct are well defined and established. They sit proudly on a firm base, have rhythmic window openings and are topped with steep roofs.

39 The edge of the escarpment of the Parliamentary Precinct has a natural character.

40 The option of constructing a new building would allow consolidation of rented research office space in commercial buildings to the Wellington Building, resulting in an annual saving of $800,000.

41 Size: small = 75 m2 (800 sq.ft.); medium = 170 m2 (1,800 sq.ft.); large = 205 m2 (2,400 sq.ft.).

42 Size: small = 75 m2 (800 sq.ft.); medium = 170 m2 (1,800 sq.ft.); large = 205 m2 (2,400 sq.ft.).

43 J. Fraser, The House of Commons at Work, p. 25.

44 Canada, Department of Public Works, Parliament Buildings, Ottawa: Plan of Ground Floor, 1910, National Archives, NMC51465.

45 "Some conveniences adjoining the room to the north of the Commons Chamber […] which we have always called the Caucus Room, although it has never been used for that purpose, the Railway Committee room having been utilized instead." J.B. Hunter, Letter, to J. A. Pearson, April 27, 1921, National Archives, RG11, 2658, f.1575-25A9.

46 Abbott Report, p. 21.

47 After the 1997 election, the third party (Bloc Québécois) had 44 MPs, the fourth party (New Democratic Party) had 21 MPs and the fifth party (Progressive Conservative) had 20 MPs. Chief Electoral Officer of Canada.

48 Canada, Parliament, House of Commons, Debates, September 16, 1968, p. 73.

49 E. Spicer, "Research Service to Party Caucuses in the Canadian Federal Parliament," Politics 9,2 (November 1974) pp. 209-12.

50 Abbott Report, p. 20.

51 This schedule has been established to complement the work in the Chamber (which does not meet on Wednesday mornings) and to allow the majority of Members to attend.

52 For the first 20 years after Confederation, the House averaged 62 sitting days per year. For the last 20 years, the average was over 135 days.

53 Of the 235 elected Members, those with special roles (20 House Officials and Ministers) and some 82 other Members obtained private offices, while the remaining 133 Members shared semi-private offices. H.W. Bowie, Sergeant-at-Arms, Statement showing the number of rooms occupied by two or more members […], January 21, 1921, NA RG11 v.2658, f.1575-25 A9.

54 J.D. Livermore, "A History of Parliamentary Accommodation in Canada, 1841–1974," in Canada, Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, Report of the Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, p. 106.

55 A. Fraser, Draft letter for Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau, to Arthur Laing, 1969.

56 Canada, Advisory Committee on Parliamentary Salaries and Expenses, Report, p. 29.

57 J. Bosley, Research paper for the Commission to Review Salaries of Members of Parliament, to James McGrath, p. 8.

58 The Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, chaired by The Honourable Douglas C. Abbott, P.C., Q.C., was established by Order in Council on April 25, 1974.

59 Expropriated by Public Works to "provide the land for an appropriate expansion of Parliamentary facilities and other government requirements." Abbott Report, p. 1.

60 On June 12, 1992 the Accommodation Subcommittee of the BOIE advised Public Works and Government Services Canada’s officials to locate Members of Parliament on the north side of Wellington Street.

61 J. Bosley, Research paper for the Commission to Review Salaries of Members of Parliament, to James McGrath, p. 15.

62 Canada, Parliament, House of Commons, Special Committee on Reform of the House of Commons, chaired by J. A. McGrath, P.C., M.P., Report of the Special Committee on Reform of the House of Commons, p. 122. [Hereafter referred to as the McGrath Report.]

63 McGrath Report, p. 122.

64 Policy approved by the BOIE in April 1997.

65 The original standard from the Abbott Report was modified to create a new standard office design. Modifications included scaling down the number of features, making better use of limited floor area and adapting the layout to ensure structural and architectural compatibility with the existing buildings of the Parliamentary Precinct.

66 House Officials include the Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Minister, Leaders of the Opposition parties, Speaker, Deputy Speaker, House Leaders and Whips.

67 House Official will receive a grouping of standard office units.

68 Room 231, West Block, was renovated into a mock-up office unit.

69 The flexible design in office units in the Justice Building allows for the accommodation of up to 84 Members and one Minister, or 74 Members and six Ministers.

70 Office sizes for Members range from 37 m2 (399 sq.ft.) to 191 m2 (2,056 sq.ft.). The average size of a Member’s office is 78 m2 (845 sq.ft.).

71 The average size of an office unit will be 83.5 m2 (900 sq.ft.) once the renovations are completed.

72 Total office units assigned are for both official role and constituency work.

73 Provides flexibility to respond to variations (e.g., election outcomes and Cabinet membership).

74 J. Bureau, Handbook to the Parliamentary and Departmental Buildings, Canada […], 1968.

75 J.D. Livermore, "A History of Parliamentary Accommodation in Canada, 1841-1974," in Canada, Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, Report of the Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, p. 97.

76 J.D. Livermore, "A History of Parliamentary Accommodation in Canada, 1841-1974," in Canada, Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, Report of the Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, p. 102.

77 Translation services were moved to the Trafalgar Building at the corner of Bank and Queen streets. G.G. Rogers, Memo re Accommodation — Translators, House of Commons — Ottawa, to Chief Architect, Department of Public Works, Leases and Accommodation, February 4, 1930.

78 A. Beauchesne, Memorandum for His Honour The Speaker re Congested Quarters Occupied by the Staff of the House of Commons, to Rodolphe Lemieux, Speaker of the House of Commons, January 16, 1930.

79 The facility on Belfast Road serves as the main freight area for screening and processing incoming merchandise and mail before distribution on Parliament Hill. It also houses the main printing plant, photomechanical and materiel management operations.

80 The Space and Furniture Allocation Policy approved by the BOIE in April 1997 includes space standards for the administration of the House of Commons.

81 Based on approved standards for offices, and on functional requirements for other working spaces.

82 Includes Library of Parliament reading rooms, health facility, day care and translators offices.

83 J. Page, "Report on the Public Buildings at Ottawa," in General Report of the Commissioner of Public Works […] 30th June 1866, Sessional Paper, No. 8, pp. 232–234.

84 Canada, National Committee for the Celebration of the Diamond Jubilee of Confederation, Report of the Executive Committee: National Diamond Jubilee of Confederation, pp. 8-9.

85 Canadian Press, "Commons Sports New Lighting System," Journal, February 17, 1965.

86 Canada, Parliament, House of Commons, Special Committee on TV and Radio Broadcasting of Proceedings of the House and its Committees, Minutes of Proceedings and Evidence, June 15, 1978.

87 Canada, Office of the Auditor General, House of Commons: Comprehensive Audit Report, April 29, 1980, p. 100.

88 Canada, Office of the Auditor General, Report to the Senate and the House of Commons on Matters of Joint Interest, December 1992.

89 Abbott Report, p. 122.

90 Abbott Report, pp. 14-16.

91 Canada Office of the Auditor General, Report of the Audit of the House of Commons Administration, November 1991. Also in Canada, Office of the Auditor General, Report to the Senate and House of Commons on Matters of Joint Interest, December 1992.

92 Canada, Parliament, House of Commons, Information Systems, Recent Technology Innovations, 1999.

93 Canada, Parliament, House of Commons, Parliamentary Precinct: Technology Infrastructure Principles, 1998.

94 This is based on 19th century military practice as developed by the Royal Engineers.

95 In 1973, when MPs moved to the Confederation Building, Public Works proposed a project (not implemented) to extend the Wellington Wall westward to include the Confederation Building as part of the Parliamentary Precinct. C. Cowan, "MPs to Be Fenced in," Journal, February 10, 1973.

96 J. Taylor, Ottawa, An Illustrated History, pp. 94-97.

97 For information on the early parkway development, see F. Todd, Report to the Ottawa Improvement Commission, 1903; see also Canada, Ottawa Improvement Commission, The Capital of Canada: Parks and Driveways, 1925.

98 For a more detailed review of this evolution, see J. Smith, Competing Identities: Parliament Hill and the Evolution of the Downtown Core, 1999.

99 J.D. Livermore, "A History of Parliamentary Accommodation in Canada, 1841–1974," in Canada, Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, Report of the Advisory Commission on Parliamentary Accommodation, p. 72.

100 Canada, Department of Public Works, Parliament Buildings, Ottawa: Plan of Ground Floor, 1910, National Archives, NMC51465.

101 C.K. Seymour-Ure, An Inquiry into the Position and Workings of the Parliamentary Press Gallery in Ottawa, p. 49.

102 Ibid. See also J. Callwood, "The Truth About Parliament," Macleans’ Magazine (April 17, 1965).

103 The Press Gallery currently has 450 members.

104 J. Smith and Associates, Architects, House of Commons Chamber, Centre Block, Parliament Hill: Proposed Modifications, 1996.

105 Canada, National Capital Commission, Canadians on the Hill: A Continuing Tradition, 1999.

106 Ibid.

107 For current patterns of public use and public programming, see P. Farevaag Smallenberg, Parliament Hill Landscape Plan, Appendix B.

108 Canada, Office of the Auditor General, Report of the Auditor General of Canada on the Parliamentary Precinct Renovations, 1998, ch. 29, par. 29.57.

109 Canada, Office of the Auditor General, Report of the Auditor General of Canada on the Parliamentary Precinct Renovations, 1998, ch. 29, par. 29.61.

110 The BOIE approved that the Centre Block be designated a multi-purpose building. Canada, Parliament, House of Commons, Extract from the Minutes of a Meeting of the Board of Internal Economy, April 13, 1988.

111 Includes Chamber, galleries, lobbies and antechamber.

112 Includes all rooms used for committees, caucus and meetings.

113 Research spaces only, caucus rooms are covered under committees.

114 Includes all 322 elected Members.

115 Includes Library of Parliament reading rooms, health facilities, day care and translators offices.

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