Interventions in Committee
 
 
 
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View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
Good afternoon, everybody.
Ms. Bhandari, my first question is for you since you're in the United States.
I have a very hard time understanding this, because you're talking about something in the United States right now such that there is this very heightened sense of national security. On the one hand, you have an executive order, which is not going to protect the privacy of non-U.S. citizens. You have one major privacy shield between the European Union, which is 28 countries, and the United States; and you have a similar understanding with Canada and probably other countries in the world. Is it not sort of ironic that the United States is demanding that the privacy of U.S. citizens should be equal to or as important as that of non-U.S. citizens to make sure there is reciprocity with the rest of the world? What is the feeling there? I do not understand. Can you provide some commentary as to why they are doing this? To me, it seems as though they're lessening their national security, because they're exposing to risk their own citizens, because in some cases, other countries may not be as prudent about protecting their privacy rights. Could you just kind of highlight why this is happening?
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
The second question I have is open to everybody.
I'm sure you're aware that the United States Congress recently rolled back regulations put in by the Obama administration for regulating ISPs. The online advertising market is worth $83 billion, and now there is a recusal of ISP providers from having to follow the same protocols with regard to someone's browsing history, usage of apps, and location. All of that is now exposed and it's all held in the United States, so for people travelling back and forth, is there a worry about the exposure?
I'm specifically talking about Canadians and other people visiting the United States.
Anyone can start.
Ms. McPhail.
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
Is there anyone else?
Ms. Bhandari, I hate to pick on you, but since you're in the United States, do you know of any privacy...? If you look at what's happening with the FTC, especially with its concept of net neutrality, it can go either way. Do you see anything or foresee anything? Do you see the situation getting worse or getting better, or is there any kind of outcry in the United States, or any kind of push-back to correct that executive order, or at least try to sort out the friction between the FTC and the FCC, especially with regard to net neutrality?
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much.
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
Good morning to you both.
Mr. Quigley, I'm the member of Parliament for Kitchener Centre, so I had the opportunity to visit the MEDA offices last year. One of the things I took away from that visit was the long-term nature of the investment that MEDA had. There was one particular project that you were involved in, and I'm sorry if I don't remember the country correctly. I think it was a dairy plant in Guatemala, which I believe was a 15- to 19-year investment.
Because you are practising investments in areas that require that, can you give us an idea how you decide what the project parameters will be and how you determine the length of the commitment to that project?
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
Ms. Greene, you talked about sectoral or geographic forms of investment.
The question I have is with regard to when you're making investments. Let's take banking for an example. I know this has happened in India where there's a lack of banking in rural areas. What they've done is to try to give everybody an Interac card to make it easier. The problem is that certain infrastructure is still required on the ground before those services can be utilized.
What is the interplay between ODA and DFI? How do you balance that? There are certain things that official development assistance will have to do prior.... There has to be an infrastructure system there prior to certain services being brought in. How do you balance the two?
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Quigley, do you have any comments?
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
Good evening, Mr. Buttarelli, and how are you enjoying Rome? We could have come to see you.
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much for your opening comments.
My questions are a bit specific. I want to start off with article 25 of the GDPR, when we talk about adequacy.
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
Especially with the focus on CETA having recently been signed, now that you have the GDPR and you are going to judge other countries' regimes against your own, what kind of test will you apply? What will that test look like? What kind of process will it be? Will it be checklists? Just give us an idea of how you will measure other countries' privacy regulations against your own so that we have an understanding.
View Raj Saini Profile
Lib. (ON)
You've also come up with the police directive, which has not been discussed. Is there a checklist or some sort of adequacy test for that also? I know that's a very important fundamental part of the privacy regulations right now in the European Union.
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