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Mace

Object name: Mace
Artist/Maker: Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Company (Great Britain)
Date: 1917
Material: Silver, gilded
Dimensions: 148.6 x 22.9 cm
Catalogue no.: O-2872

The general design of the mace is very similar to the one used by the British House of Commons. The vase-shaped head is divided into four panels by female figures with acanthus leaf terminals. These panels display the Arms of Canada, the rose of England, the harp of Ireland and the thistle of Scotland. Above each emblem is the Tudor Crown, with the initials "E R" (Elizabeth Regina) placed on either side. In the space above the figures is shown the beaver executed in bold relief. The head of the mace is supported by four ornamental brackets, and is surmounted with the Royal Crown. Inside the circlet of the crown, the Royal Arms of the United Kingdom appear in relief. The staff, divided by gadrooned rings and terminated by a knob, is richly chased with the rose, shamrock, thistle, fleur-de-lis and the maple leaf.

Inscription: THE MACE, REPLACING THE ORIGINAL MACE OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS OF THE DOMINION OF CANADA DESTROYED BY FIRE ON FEBRUARY 3RD 1916, WAS PRESENTED BY COLONEL THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR CHARLES CHEERS WAKEFIELD, LORD MAYOR OF LONDON, AND BY THE SHERIFFS OF LONDON, GEORGE ALEXANDER TOUCHE, ESQ., M.P. AND SAMUEL GEORGE SHEAD, ESQ.

The new mace was presented to Prime Minister Robert L. Borden at The Guildhall, London, on March 28, 1917.

The original intention was to incorporate a piece of metal thought to be the remains of the original mace, which had been salvaged from the 1916 fire. However, an analysis performed by the Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Company revealed that the piece of metal could not be part of the old mace; for that reason, it was not included in the new mace.

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